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Download The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi eBook

by Arthur Lennig

Download The Immortal Count: The Life and Films of Bela Lugosi eBook
ISBN:
081312302X
Author:
Arthur Lennig
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
The University Press of Kentucky (June 27, 2003)
EPUB book:
1938 kb
FB2 book:
1668 kb
DJVU:
1892 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
755


Bela Lugosi won immediate fame for his portrayal of the immortal count in the 1931 film Dracula Mostly interested in the films and the making of some of the classics, but also find fascinating the life of Bela Lugosi.

Bela Lugosi won immediate fame for his portrayal of the immortal count in the 1931 film Dracula. After a decade of trying vainly to broaden his range and secure parts to challenge his acting abilities. Mostly interested in the films and the making of some of the classics, but also find fascinating the life of Bela Lugosi. The way his career nearly disappeared after his greatest role has been used as a warning to other actors that being perfect for the part can also lead to stereotyping and limited roles in the future.

University Press of Kentucky. John D. Imboden is an important but often overlooked figure in Civil War history. Spencer C. Tucker fully examines the life of this Confederate cavalry commander, including analysis of ImbodenÕs own post-war writing, and explores overlooked facets of his life, such as his involvement in the Confederate prison system, his later efforts to restore the economic life of his home state of Virginia by developing its natural resources, and his founding of the city of Damascus, which he hoped to make into a new iron and steel center.

The Immortal Count book. They chatted and Lugosi actually visited Lennig's home after a summer stock performance of "Arsenic and Old Lace" in Sea Cliff, New York. This brief section of the book, complete with the author's snapshots of the meeting are worth checking out. "At home Lugosi was ushered in by the beaming boy, who regretted that none of his friends happened to come by at this moment of supreme bliss. After a decade of trying vainly to broaden his range and secure parts to challenge his acting abilities, Lugosi resigned himself to a career as the world's most recognizable vampire. His last years were spent as a forgotten and rather tragic figure.

Book Description: Bela Lugosi won immediate fame for his portrayal of the immortal count in the 1931 film Dracula. The future career of Bela Lugosi depended not solely on his own decisions-often not wise ones-but also on a number of complex factors.

Published by: University Press of Kentucky. Book Description: Bela Lugosi won immediate fame for his portrayal of the immortal count in the 1931 film Dracula.

In 1974, devoted Lugosi fan Arthur Lennig published a highly regarded biography of the unsung actor. More than twice the length of the original and completely rewritten, The Immortal Count provides deeper insights into Lugosi's films and personality.

Lennig, Arthur; Rouben Mamoulian Collection (Library of Congress) DLC. Publication date. Lugosi, Bela, 1882-1956, Motion picture actors and actresses, Dracula, Count (Fictitious character), Dracula films. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Bela The early years Broadway to Hollywood The fateful decision Dracula, the film Fame The peak The comeback The war years The decline The final years.

Publication, Distribution, et. Lexington Bela The early years Broadway to Hollywood The fateful decision Dracula, the film Fame The peak The comeback The war years The decline The final years. Personal Name: Lugosi, Bela, 1882-1956.

This book is an odd coupling of fanzine and scholarship. Star-struck since childhood by Lugosi as Dracula (and armed with photos to prove a zero degree of separation), Lennig is also professor emeritus of film studies at SUNY Albany.

" A special leatherbound, signed and numbered edition! Bela Lugosi won immediate fame for his portrayal of the immortal count in the 1931 film Dracula. After a decade of trying vainly to broaden his range and secure parts to challenge his acting abilities, Lugosi resigned himself to a career as the world's most recognizable vampire. His last years were spent as a forgotten and rather tragic figure. When he died in 1956, Lugosi could not have known that vindication of his talent would come -- his face would adorn theaters, his image would appear on greeting cards and postage stamps, his film memorabilia would sell for more than he earned in his entire career, and his Hungarian accent would be instantly recognized by millions of people. Martin Landau's Oscar-winning role as Lugosi in the 1994 film Ed Wood added an ironic twist to a career that had ended in oblivion. In 1974, devoted Lugosi fan Arthur Lennig published a highly regarded biography of the unsung actor. More than twice the length of the original and completely rewritten, The Immortal Count provides deeper insights into Lugosi's films and personality. Drawing upon personal interviews, studio memos, shooting scripts, research in Romania and Hungary, and his own recollections, Lennig has written the definitive account of Lugosi's tragic life.

  • Zeleence
There are often times biographies may omit certain areas of life of their subject. This can be out of either lack or research or personal bias. "The Immortal Count" is not one of those. Arthur Lennig is a true fan but also shows Lugosi "warts and all" in a complete look at his life, his loves, and his work in film and stage. Lennig gives to many of us fans a more complete picture of a legend in the genre of horror films. He gives us his early years in Europe and then follows the highs and the lows of Bela's ups and downs from "Dracula" to "Bride of the Atom". The book moves at a good pace but at the same time gives a complete break down of Bela's movies, what they were about, some of the trials of making the cheap Monogram pics , and interesting stories related to the movies. He relates, for instance, of what actually took place on the filming of "Frankenstein meets the Wolfman" and why his acting is so ridiculed but which Lennig shows that it was a result of Universal Studios to edit the movie after it was made and so chopped the movie up that Lugosi's efforts appear so weak. He also shows the sad and lonely Lugosi as his later years found him cut off from working and falling deeper into alcohol and drug abuse. I was literally heartbroke as I read of his last years and of how such a great actor was used by so many and helped by so few. I enjoyed the book immensely and recommended to any fan of the horror films but especially to Lugosi fans.
  • Sorryyy
Since watching the original Dracula starring Lugosi I've been a big fan. As a youngster I was terrified an slept with the light on for the early part of the fifties. The book reveals the sad life of a great movie star. Literally cursed with his role as the count and his lack of respect from his peers, and the studio that he saved from bankruptcy brings a tear to the reader. The man never missed a rehearsal and even given low billing and awlful parts was a trooper. It's a shame that Mr. Lugosi died before respect was finally shown to him.
  • Kekinos
Mostly interested in the films and the making of some of the classics, but also find fascinating the life of Bela Lugosi. The way his career nearly disappeared after his greatest role has been used as a warning to other actors that being perfect for the part can also lead to stereotyping and limited roles in the future.

The book tends to be very kind to Lugosi in many respects, even crediting his performances with genius that even fans like me don't see. Still, it is a well researched and makes for compelling reading for anyone interested in Lugosi and 1930-1950 film making.
  • Alsanadar
A classic book of early scholarship on Bela. More recent biographies have filled in the gaps but this is a great resource.
  • Rrd
In a word, Lennig's book is too long by half at least. Endless synopses of ancient and ridiculous movies when Bela's life at the time of production is what would be interesting. I found myself skimming through page after page of movie plot, searching for a crumb of what was going on in Lugosi's life at the time. The beginning chapters are fine: Hungary at the time of Lugosi's birth, his childhood, etc. But enough with the movie plots. As I said, way too much synopses of films and plays, too little of the Immortal Count.
  • Ichalote
In 1974 Prof. Arthur Lennig wrote a biography of Bela Lugosi called "The Count". Long out-of-print, I've seen used copies selling on Amazon-internet for as much as $600. In 2000, Lennig penned "Stroheim", a cerebral study, challenging the myths of Stroheim's life. "Stroheim" is now considered the ultimate biography of Erich von Stroheim. In 2003, Lennig released "The Immortal Count", an expanded, re-written analysis of the life and films of Lugosi. Using all new records and actual Hungarian data, Lennig shatters accepted legends; he re-explores this great actor's legacy. Lugosi himself recalled for the press his early starring role in "Hamlet" at Hungary's Royal National Theater. But it never happened. He played only a small supporting role as Rosencrantz. In 1955, at the end of his life, Lugosi voluntarily submitted himself to Los Angeles authorities for drug rehabilitation. "I've been an addict for 20 years!" he proclaimed. It never happened. His fourth wife Lillian(who lived with him for 23 years) testified that he began taking pain-killing medications in 1943. Blessed with grace and talent as a young man, Lugosi acted in plays and films in Hungary and Germany; enticing young women and attracting married ones as well. Appearing on a Los Angeles stage in "Dracula" in 1928, he began a torrid affair with the famous 23-year-old siren Clara Bow. He was 46. After starring in Universal's 1931 "Dracula", and being offered the lead in "Frankenstein", Lugosi enjoyed a few years of glittering Hollywood success. But poor fiscal decisions, bad business managers, five marriages, and horror-film typecasting ushered Lugosi into years of low-paying roles in minor B-Pictures. And no money. From legal records and other information, Lugosi was virtually penniless in 1921, 1924, 1932, 1937-1938, and from 1953 on to his death. So much for the Hollywood dream. Once a proud, old-world European, he now faced hardship and embarrassment. Battling depression and alcoholism, Bela Lugosi died ignored and forgotten in Hollywood on August 16, 1956. His entire estate was valued at less than $1900. "The Immortal Count" bravely dissects the ironic life and amazing legend of one of the 20th Century's greatest performers. In 1931, the horror film industry was born: Universal Pictures' "Dracula". The star, Bela Lugosi, was paid just $3500. Last year, I saw an old Bela Lugosi poster(50 years old) selling on EBAY for $5,000. Sadly, Lugosi would never know the world's true calculation of his unique talents. "The way you walked was thorny, through no fault of your own. But as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea, so tears run to their predestined end. Your suffering is over, Bela my son. Now you will find peace."