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Download Eugene Onegin: A Novel in Verse (Oxford World's Classics) eBook

by Alexander Pushkin,James E. Falen

Download Eugene Onegin: A Novel in Verse (Oxford World's Classics) eBook
ISBN:
0199538646
Author:
Alexander Pushkin,James E. Falen
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; Reissue edition (March 25, 2009)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1562 kb
FB2 book:
1667 kb
DJVU:
1139 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
242


Pushkin's masterpiece Eugene Onegin: A Novel in Verse tells the intersecting stories of three men and three women in the Russia of the 1820s, showcasing its author's wit and intelligence throughout his engaging and suspenseful narrative.

Pushkin's masterpiece Eugene Onegin: A Novel in Verse tells the intersecting stories of three men and three women in the Russia of the 1820s, showcasing its author's wit and intelligence throughout his engaging and suspenseful narrative. James E. Falen is Professor of Russian at the University of Tennessee. Series: Oxford World's Classics.

James E. Falen is a professor emeritus of Russian at the University of Tennessee

James E. Falen is a professor emeritus of Russian at the University of Tennessee. He published a translation of Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin in 1990 which was also influenced by Nabokov's translation, but preserved the Onegin stanzas (. ISBN 0809316307). This translation is considered to be the most faithful one to Pushkin's spirit according to Russian critics and translators.

OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS EUGENE ONEGIN ALEXANDER SERGEEVICH PUSHKIN was born in Moscow in 1799 into an old aristocratic family. As a schoolboy he demonstrated a precocious talent for verse and was recognized as a poetic prodigy by prominent older writers. His narrative poem, Ruslan and Lyudmila (publ. 1820), brought him widespread fame and secured his place as the leading figure in Russian poetry.

Oxford world's classics. A Novel in Verse A Chronology of Alexander Pushkin. Translated with an Introduction and Notes by JAMES E. FALEN. James . alen 1990, 1995. ISBN-13: 978-0-19-283899-5. A Chronology of Alexander Pushkin. EUGENE ONEGIN 1. Appendix: Excerpts from Onegin's Journey. 213. Explanatory Notes. Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837) is the poet and writer whom Russians regard as both the source and the summit of their literature.

Eugene Onegin was Pushkin's own favourite work, and it shows him .

Eugene Onegin was Pushkin's own favourite work, and it shows him attempting to transform himself from a romantic poet into a realistic novelist. Set in 1820s imperial Russia, Pushkin's novel in verse follows the emotions and destiny of three men - Onegin the bored fop, Lensky the minor elegiast, and a stylized Pushkin himself - and the fates and affections of three women - Tatyana the provincial beauty, her sister Olga, and Pushkin's mercurial Muse.

By Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin, James E. Falen (Translator). MY HERO recommends this book to readers of all age groups. Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in 1820s Russia, Pushkin's verse novel follows the fates of three men and three women

James E. Falen's translation of Eugene Onegin conveys with accuracy and utmost fidelity the effervescent depths and heady verve of Pushkin's sparkling and profound masterpiece. The notes are invaluable for students. -Sonia Ketchian, Massachusetts Institute of Technology "A lively and readable translation.

On 4 November 1823 Pushkin wrote to a friend, Prince Vyazemsky, from Odessa: ‘I am writing now not a novel, but a novel in verse – the devil of a difference.

Translated with an Introduction and Notes by. Stanley mitchell. Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. On 4 November 1823 Pushkin wrote to a friend, Prince Vyazemsky, from Odessa: ‘I am writing now not a novel, but a novel in verse – the devil of a difference. Som. ething like Don Juan – there’s no point in thinking about publication; I’m writing whatever comes into my head. 2 Odessa was Pushkin’s second place of exile after Kishinev, in Bessarabia.

I'm very glad to get this famous novel in a brilliant translation by James . alen. It is a special pleasure for a Russian to read it in English written so pleasant and perfect. I'm very glad to get this famous novel in a brilliant translation by James . So what can I say more, I just want to read it again!

This novel in verse permeates all aspects of Russian culture, lauded both in the tsarist Russia and the USSR.

Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard. Pasha Uhin James E. Falen's version is the best in my opinion (I'm Russian), it keeps the flow and rhythm of the original which reads very quickly and easily. This novel in verse permeates all aspects of Russian culture, lauded both in the tsarist Russia and the USSR.

Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in 1820s Russia, Pushkin's verse novel follows the fates of three men and three women. Engaging, full of suspense, and varied in tone, it also portrays a large cast of other characters and offers the reader many literary, philosophical, and autobiographical digressions, often in a highly satirical vein. Eugene Onegin was Pushkin's own favorite work, and this new translation conveys the literal sense and the poetic music of the original.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
  • Mr_NiCkNaMe
As a native Russian speaker, I can say that this is far and away the most true-to-the-original translation of Pushkin's great masterpiece – in every sense. It is gloriously fluent, idiomatic, and, miraculously, manages to convey the joyous, playful, seemingly effortless, Mozartian rhythm of the original while neither sacrificing precision of register nor contorting the English language to serve the needs of meter, prosody, or rhyme.

James Falen was born to translate Eugene Onegin into English, and deserves the highest praise for this towering achievement.
  • Wymefw
I went through a phase in my early 20s where I read most of Dostoevsky that was in translation, and that led me to Gogol and Tolstoy and Turgenev – all the Russian greats that were part of the cultural canon but were not taught to me as an English major. If there is a blind spot in how we arranged the curriculum for English majors about 20 years ago, it was good that the English language canon had been opened, but bad in that it kept out anything that was only available in translation.

Anyway, those greats of prose all mentioned Pushkin as the master poet of the Russian language, but somehow, I hadn’t read his work. Overall, Onegin is one of those comedy of manners that are sort of alien to the reader so you have to go to notes to get references, It’s not bad, but it does ask more of the reader to keep track of the culture and time and then all the characters than a more contemporary work grounded in the current time and place do. It is worth reading, but to me it was more worthwhile as a historical and cultural touchstone than the enjoyment of the thing itself.
  • Ffan
Sparkling translation with a brief but illuminating introduction. I compared a few translations and decided to go with the one that sounded more like American English, and I was not disappointed, it flowed and danced with great charm and wit. I don't read Russian so have no basis to really judge, but comparing it to the Nabokov translation, which is supposed to be very literal (and doesn't rhyme), I got the sense that this one is as faithful to the original as one could hope. I wish there were more notes -- they were not extensive, and I couldn't figure out why some foreign/obscure terms deserved a note and not others. But a joy to read in any case.
  • blac wolf
I really loved reading this translation of Eugene Onegin. Many lines were so well articulated that I had to speak them aloud, just to see if they sounded as good not in my head (they did). Beautiful stuff.

I'd recommend this version for a first time reader. I tried reading two other versions before this one, and this one is blows them out of the water. It's a lot more fun than other translations, and the copious footnotes help one stay clear on the poem.
  • Marilace
Reviewers seem to think that Falen's is the best translation and, at least in comparison to a few others that I was able to look at, I have to agree. He maintains Pushkin's unusual rhyme scheme and still keeps the text quite readable. I recommend it to anyone interested in trying this important Russian novel.
  • Vonalij
Coming to this, I was already familiar with Pushkin -- both from his short story "Queen of Spades" (and Tchaikovsky's operatic version), and from other allusions to him in later Russian writers. Pushkin has for Russians the same sort of significance that Shakespeare has for English speakers. Everyone, from Gogol and Dostoevsky, to Pasternak and Solzhenitsyn, has riffed on him. And although the "Queen of Spades" hinted at why he holds place of pride in Russian letters, "Onegin" only offers additional proof of his genius.

Without giving away too much, the story itself has a nice, circular design to it. One of Pushkin's chief virtues must be his voice itself -- which, as I am not a Russian speaker, I guess to be a sort of cheeky, and Byronic, one,(nb: Pushkin is obviously familiar with, and indebted to, Byron, particularly in this work). This James Falen translation is particularly meritorious -- it preserves Pushkin's "Onegin octave" verse form, and iambic tetrameter. Falen's translation is gorgeous, musical, and in remarkably clear, grammatically sound English.

Aside from its story, "Onegin" may be thought of as commenting on, and narrating the death of the long poem as a viable literary form, and the rise of the novel. For instance, consider that the death of Lensky coincides with the narrator's own growing dissatisfaction with verse, and preference for prose. Pushkin's own dissatisfaction proved to be prophetic -- after "Onegin", epic verse has practically vanished, as a form. The longest poem (that I am aware of) which is of more recent vintage than "Onegin" is by another Russian, but in English: Nabokov's "Pale Fire."

Ultimately, we witness the passing of an entire world in "Onegin," that of late-eighteenth century (and early nineteenth) Russia -- with its duels, its music, its ballrooms, its manners. It is about to be supplanted by the grittier, dimmer psychological world of Dostoevsky, or the bright, hard-edged realism of Tolstoy.
  • Prinna
I loved the opera based on this novel in verse. Wasn't sure how I'd like this form of literature especially since it is a translation into English. After reading a few pages I was enthralled by its style. I can't believe what a brilliant job the translator did in maintaining Pushkin's poetic magic. It was a delight to read and appreciate the rhythmic flow of the words across the pages.