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Download The Reasonableness of Christianity As Delivered in the Scriptures (Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke) eBook

by John C. Higgins-Biddle,John Locke

Download The Reasonableness of Christianity As Delivered in the Scriptures (Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke) eBook
ISBN:
0198245254
Author:
John C. Higgins-Biddle,John Locke
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Clarendon Press (March 23, 2000)
Pages:
408 pages
EPUB book:
1864 kb
FB2 book:
1736 kb
DJVU:
1983 kb
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
256


In his 89-page introduction, John Higgins-Biddle places the work in the context of Locke's philosophy and political theory and evaluates the . Later in the book, Locke takes up the issue of the destiny of the unevangelized, a very thorny issue in most doctrinal systems

In his 89-page introduction, John Higgins-Biddle places the work in the context of Locke's philosophy and political theory and evaluates the opinions of those who have interpreted Locke as a Diest, as a Socinian or a Unitarian, or as a Hobbist. Later in the book, Locke takes up the issue of the destiny of the unevangelized, a very thorny issue in most doctrinal systems. Using the natural law thinking for which Locke is famous, he reasons that even a person raised with no contact with the Judeo-Christian tradition can see that the ability to show mercy and forgiveness is evidence of a good character.

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Start by marking The Reasonableness of Christianity as Delivered in the Scriptures (Works of John Locke) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It is an old book, t John Locke was the Father of British Empiricist Philosophy - the philosophy of down-to-earth, ordinary, everyday simple observation and experiment. And THIS is his powerfully inspiring and innovative vision of what Christianity really means to him in SIMPLE, CLEAR terms.

Locke, John, 1632-1704.

Locke maintains that the essentials of the faith, few and simple, can be found by anyone for themselves in the Scripture, and that this provides a basis for tolerant agreement among Christians. An authoritative text is accompanied by abundant information conducive to an understanding of Locke's religious thought.

THE Reasonableness of Christianity as delivered in the Scriptures - ..

This volume contains three pieces by Locke on the reasonableness of Christian belief.

Locke maintains that the essentials of the faith, few and.

John locke by leslie stephen. Please visit ww. elphiclassics The Works of John Locke, in Ten Volumes - Vol. IX: Volume 9. John Locke. elphiclassics. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. The Works of John Locke, in Ten Volumes - Vol. From the American and French revolutions to modern theories of consciousness to contemporary entertainment (the hit TV series Lost features a character named John Locke who espouses Lockeian concepts), the influence of English philosopher JOHN LOCKE (16321704) falls wide and deep over Western culture.

Pp. cxxxix+261 incl. frontispiece and 2 plates. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1999. 55. 0 19 824525 4. Alan P. F. Sell (a1).

John Locke examined the significance of the Fall and its relation to the teachings of Christ . The Complete Works of John Locke (Inline Footnotes).

John Locke examined the significance of the Fall and its relation to the teachings of Christ in the New Testament. This is a must-read book for readers who are interested in deepest thoughts about the religion and Christianity by John Locke, one of the greatest tinkers on the planet. Books related to The Reasonableness of Christianity, As Delivered in the Scriptures (Illustrated).

This is the first major critical edition of Locke's 1695 enquiry into the foundations of Christianity. Locke maintains that the essentials of the faith, few and simple, can be found by anyone for themselves in the Scripture, and that this provides a basis for tolerant agreement among Christians. An authoritative text is accompanied by abundant information conducive to an understanding of Locke's religious thought.
  • breakingthesystem
The text in this edition is so small as to make the book almost unreadable. I have wanted a copy of this work for some time, but I won't ruin my eyesight to read it. Very disappointed. This has only happened once before, with a copy of Richard Baxter's collected works that I purchased (by a different publisher).
  • Brariel
This is "The Book" that amplifies the major concepts in the Bible and creates the best arguments for Protestantism. These ideas and thoughts had circulated among the Protestant faith for nearly a century or more. To the Catholic mind it was a series of thesies that could never be accepted by Mother Church. John Locke pulled all the material together and using his fantastic intellect solidified many Protestant ideas you always wondered where hey came from Buy the Book quick. If you are a Christian; you want to know and come up on your understanding like a believing scholar.
  • Akelevar
(I am reposting this review, because the email address was wrong and it did not show up on my review page.)
The puritan physician John Locke (1632-1704) is one of the greatest philosophers, and certainly the one who was the most influential on the American civilization. Locke's life and the context in which he wrote this book are presented in Ewing's introduction, however without serious philosophical considerations. Ewing still mentions Locke's willingness to defend Christianity against the intellectual attacks lead by the deists, and how much opposition Locke's The Reasonableness of Christianity received, in particular from the revivalist clergyman Jonathan Edwards, who accused him of atheism. Since Locke's book did not have any divisions nor chapters, Ewing has numbered the paragraphes and compiled an outline.
Locke first deals with the need for salvation and the content of the gospel preached by the apostles and Jesus. He then proceeds to a very lengthy analysis of the gospels (as someone said: "Locke has no mercy on the patience of his readers.") Locke defends the Christian truth with the miracles and the resurrection of Jesus, His indirect declarations of Messiahship and His fulfilment of the messianic prophecies. I was surprised to learn much from Locke's sharp analysis of the gospels, for example why Jesus did not reveal His identity directly during most of His ministry. Locke then answers some general objections (about the salvation of the unevangelized, etc.) In the last part of the book Locke points at some insufficiencies in the general divine revelation in nature (although Locke believed in the truth of such a revelation) and argues for the necessity of special revelation.
Locke's arguments may have been convincing in his time. But Locke wrote before the attacks of Hume against miracles or before the attacks of the liberal theologians based on the historical-critical method. Locke's argumentation would be incomplete for modern readers. These would be more helped by modern apologetics books. However, those interested in an analysis of Jesus' ministry may benefit from Locke's book, provided they are motivated enough to endure his lengthy style. Those interested in Locke's philosophy may benefit more from the edition by I. T. Ramsey (John Locke. The Reasonableness of Christianity. With a Discourse on Miracles and Part of A Third Letter Concerning Toleration. Introduced and edited by I. T. Ramsey. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1958.) Ramsey has brilliantly introduced and outlined the book, has abridged the text, and also introduced and edited some of Locke's arguments about miracles.
  • Vichredag
Locke is not easy to read because of the vernacular of that era, but it is well worth sticking with it until the end. His political philosophy had a profound impact on our Founders and the great Constitution they wrote, in spite of some of its flaws. Any student of history should read this book and Locke's Second Treatise of Government.
  • Grillador
I have 20/20 vision and the print is so small it is unreadable without magnification.
  • Shakar
If you've absorbed our culture's view that all Enlightenment thinkers were either deists or atheists, you need to read this.

If you already knew the falsity of that assertion, you still need to read this.

In the first part of the book, Locke lays out a case that the essential content of the preaching of John the baptizer, Jesus, and Jesus' apostles was this: Jesus is the Messiah. Locke makes a convincing case that the phrase, "the kingdom of God is at hand," means essentially the same thing. The density of Scripture quotations is higher than any other book I've read.

Later in the book, Locke takes up the issue of the destiny of the unevangelized, a very thorny issue in most doctrinal systems. Using the natural law thinking for which Locke is famous, he reasons that even a person raised with no contact with the Judeo-Christian tradition can see that the ability to show mercy and forgiveness is evidence of a good character. Therefore, God must also be like that--indeed, even more so. Using Jesus dictum that "to whom much is given much will be demanded" and the converse, that to whom less is given, less will be demanded, Locke concludes that God's mercy will extend to those who respond positively to the light of the "law written on their hearts."

Locke's Two Treatises on Government should be understood with Locke's Christian convictions in mind. So much of Locke's political ideas are foundational to our Declaration of Independence, it might not be too far-fetched to think that without Locke we might all still be singing "God Save the Queen."
  • Hǻrley Quinn
Outstanding!
The editor felt that "it seemed wise to abridge the text at various points," hence not a copy for close study.