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Download The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy: You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series) eBook

by William Irwin,Jason T. Eberl

Download The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy: You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series) eBook
ISBN:
1119038065
Author:
William Irwin,Jason T. Eberl
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (October 12, 2015)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1313 kb
FB2 book:
1662 kb
DJVU:
1785 kb
Other formats
rtf mbr docx doc
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
515


Jason T. Eberl is the Semler Endowed Chair for Medical Ethics and Professor of Philosophy at Marian University in Indianapolis, where he. .

Jason T. Eberl is the Semler Endowed Chair for Medical Ethics and Professor of Philosophy at Marian University in Indianapolis, where he teaches bioethics, ethics, and medieval philosophy. Kevin S. Decker is Professor of Philosophy at Eastern Washington University, where he teaches ethics, American and Continental Philosophy, and philosophy of popular culture. Series: The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series (Book 1).

Presents the most far-reaching examination of the philosophy behind Star Wars – includes coverage of the entire film catalogue to date as well as the Expanded Universe of novels, comics, television series, games and toys.

Start by marking The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy: You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy: You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series).

Series: The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series. File: PDF, . 8 MB. Читать онлайн. Provides serious explorations into the deeper meaning of George Lucas’s philosophically rich creation. Series: The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series.

The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy: You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned. Superman and Philosophy: What Would the Man of Steel Do? Supernatural and Philosophy: Metaphysics and Monster. or Idjits. Terminator and Philosophy: I’ll Be Back, Therefore I Am. True Detective and Philosophy: A Deeper Kind of Darkness. Twilight and Philosophy: Vampires, Vegetarians, and the Pursuit of Immortality. Veronica Mars and Philosophy: Investigating the Mysteries of Life (Which is a Bitch Until You.

Presents the most far-reaching examination of the philosophy behind Star Wars - includes coverage of the entire film catalogue to date as well as the Expanded Universe of novels, comics, television series, games and toys.

In a philosophy-themed book series pandering to a general audience and including pop cultural phenomena ranging .

In a philosophy-themed book series pandering to a general audience and including pop cultural phenomena ranging from Harry Potter and Twilight to House. Analogous to the seven episodes of the saga released by the time of its publishing, the book has seven parts, each containing three to five chapters which are grouped conceptually (morals, metaphysics, the non-human, et.

In a philosophy-themed book series pandering to a general audience and including pop cultural phenomena ranging from Harry Potter and Twilight to House and Game of Thrones (all relatively recent bestsellers, blockbusters, and hit TV series), Star Wars takes an honorary place, with.

In a philosophy-themed book series pandering to a general audience and including pop cultural phenomena ranging from Harry Potter and Twilight to House and Game of Thrones (all relatively recent bestsellers, blockbusters, and hit TV series), Star Wars takes an honorary place, with its die-hard fan base spanning generations.

Does it take faith to be a Jedi? Are droids capable of thought? Should Jar Jar Binks be held responsible for the rise of the Empire? Presenting entirely new essays, no aspect of the myth and magic of George Lucas’s creation is left philosophically unexamined in The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy.

The editors of the original Star Wars and Philosophy strike back in this Ultimate volume that encompasses the complete Star Wars universePresents the most far-reaching examination of the philosophy behind Star Wars – includes coverage of the entire film catalogue to date as well as the Expanded Universe of novels, comics, television series, games and toysProvides serious explorations into the deeper meaning of George Lucas’s philosophically rich creationTopics explored include the moral code of bounty-hunter favourite Boba Fett, Stoicism and the Jedi Order, the nature of the Dark Side, Anakin and Achilles in a nihilism face-off, feminism and being chained to a giant slug, cloning, de-extinction, fatherhood, Wookiees, loyalty, betrayal, guardians, republics, tyrants, terrorism, civic duty, friendship, family, and more!Publishing in time for the global release of Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens on December 18, 2015 – hotly anticipated to become the first film to top $3 billion in worldwide box office sales
  • Lianeni
This is an eye opener. Going back to where the origins of the philosophies of the jedi, religion and ancient history, George Lucas really did some research when writing the series. Who knew all of this was so deeply imbedded in the series? Now I understand why it is so universally loved and respected. A great read! Not one to read straight through, but to read a bit and then ponder, discuss.
  • Quynaus
Far more consistent than many "... and Philosophy" readers. Highly recommended for the Star Wars loving philosopher, or philosophy loving Star Wars fan in your life!
  • Roram
This book would be interesting if you've watched more than just the movies. For much of it to make sense, you have to have watched the cartoons and even read some of the books that are out there. Much of the time, I found myself wondering what the author was talking about. As a philosophy text, it isn't bad but it's not terribly exciting either.
  • Throw her heart
Great read. Intelligent discussions involving many aspects of the Star Wars universe. In the first SW and Philosophy book I was disappointed in the focus on the movies while ignoring the majority of the SW universe and while reading this I enjoyed the fact that this book didn't follow Disney's example in abandoning the EU.
  • digytal soul
great
  • Silly Dog
Great Book.
  • Pedora
I purchased this book for my husband as he is a big fan. He is liking this book so far. He says it is interesting to look at the book from different points of views. It is a good book for any fan. This makes a great birthday or holiday gift.
Like so many collected volumes, this one is a mixed bag. The value of a book about Star Wars and philosophy, I think, is in what philosophy can contribute to our thinking about Star Wars or what Star Wars can contribute to our philosophical thinking. Nothing in here really accomplishes the latter, and I didn't really expect them to. If you mostly want to learn about philosophy, you're better off with a book that focuses just on philosophy.

However, there are a few interesting papers in here that manage to contribute valuable philosophical ideas to the discussion about Star Wars:

-William A. Lindemuth's article suggests that Luke Skywalker is a Kierkegaardian Knight of Faith. The exposition isn't amazing, but the idea is one of the most interesting in the volume.
-Adam Barkman and Kyle Alkema fruitfully compare the Jedi order to what Plato says in The Republic, and Terrance MacMullan compares that to what Nietzsche has to say.
-Cole Bowman gives one of the most insightful (if too brief) feminist perspectives on Star Wars in print.
-Marek McGann illuminates the notions of the Force and Jedi training with ideas from Merleau-Ponty.

What makes these essays good is that they use philosophical theory to offer interpretations of what's going on in the movies. The problem with some of the other essays in the volume is that they seem more like they're using the movies as an excuse to talk about a philosophical topic that has only marginal relevance to the Star Wars. That way of doing things doesn't add anything to our understanding of Star Wars, and it's not the ideal way to discuss philosophy either, since Star Wars is often more a distraction from philosophical issues than a means of illuminating them.

The explanations of philosophical concepts and the positions of historical philosophers are not always accurate and seldom thorough enough for my taste, but I suppose that's all we can expect of a book in popular philosophy. The biggest problem with this volume, however, is that each essay is about 10 pages long, and very little of interest can accomplished in 10 pages when 20% of your text is fan-service references to Star Wars.

If you're really interested in thinking about Star Wars, this book is worth a look, but if you're mostly interested in reading really good philosophy, look elsewhere.

Finally, if you're curious whether to buy this book or Star Wars and Philosophy: More Powerful than You Can Possibly Imagine, I'd tentatively recommend More Powerful than You Can Possibly Imagine. The books are comparable in style and quality overall, but the four best essays in More Powerful than You Can Possibly Imagine are better than the four best essays in this volume, and while this volume is longer and gives you more material, More Powerful than You Can Possibly Imagine has about as much good material.