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Download Aristotle on Moral Responsibility: Character and Cause eBook

by Susan Sauve Meyer

Download Aristotle on Moral Responsibility: Character and Cause eBook
ISBN:
0199697426
Author:
Susan Sauve Meyer
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (February 20, 2012)
Pages:
216 pages
EPUB book:
1402 kb
FB2 book:
1350 kb
DJVU:
1752 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
487


Susan Sauve Meyer is Professor and Chair of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. After T. Irwin's work on Aristotle, Dr. Meyer's text is perhaps the best title on the subject of Moral Responsibility in Aristotle's writings that I have read.

Susan Sauve Meyer is Professor and Chair of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of Ancient Ethics and numerous articles on Greek and Roman philosophy. Also, her recent survey text on Ancient Philosophy is a service to every student of Philosophy and a must have reference piece - Ironically, I feel that it fits perfectly alongside Irwin's Classical Thought (Oxford Press, 12/28/88) as far as lucidity and structure.

Aristotle On Moral Responsibility book. Start by marking Aristotle On Moral Responsibility: Character And Cause as Want to Read

Aristotle On Moral Responsibility book. Start by marking Aristotle On Moral Responsibility: Character And Cause as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

On this and other fronts Aristotle's is a view to be taken seriously by theorists of moral responsibility.

It makes the case that these constitute a theory of moral responsibility - albeit one with important differences from modern theories. On this and other fronts Aristotle's is a view to be taken seriously by theorists of moral responsibility. Keywords: Eudemian, Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle, responsible agency, causality, moral responsibility. Bibliographic Information. Print publication date: 2011.

Professor of Philosophy and Undergraduate Chair. Aristotle on Moral Responsibility: Character and Cause. Blackwell 1993; reissued Oxford UP 2011). Selected Publications.

Aristotle on Moral Responsibility. She makes the case that these constitute a theory of moral t one with important differences from modern theories.

Susan Sauvé Meyer," Ethics 106, no. 2 (Ja. 1996): 455-457. Moral Realism, Aesthetic Realism, and the Asymmetry Claim.

Aristotle on Moral Responsibility: Character and Cause. Susan Sauvé Meyer," Ethics 106, no. Discounting, Climate Change, and the Ecological Fallacy. Getting Real on al Science, Nudging, and Public Policy. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

Like most work on moral responsibility, this entry will tend to focus on the negative side . 2. Some Approaches to Moral Responsibility.

Like most work on moral responsibility, this entry will tend to focus on the negative side of the phenomenon; for more, see the entry on blame. Young children, for example, can cause outcomes while failing to fulfill the requirements for general moral responsibility, in which case it will not be appropriate to judge them morally responsible for, or to hold them morally responsible for, the outcomes for which they may be causally responsible.

What makes an agent subject to moral expectations and evaluations, and what makes such an agent subject to moral evaluation for particular things he or she does? . by Susan Sauve Meyer.

What makes an agent subject to moral expectations and evaluations, and what makes such an agent subject to moral evaluation for particular things he or she does? I. .

When people attribute moral responsibility, they usually attribute it to individual moral agents. Meyer, Susan Sauvé, Chappell, . Aristotle on Moral Responsibility'. However, Joel Feinberg, among others, has argued that corporations and other groups of people can have what is called ‘collective moral responsibility’ for a state of affairs. For example, when South Africa had an apartheid regime, the country's government might have been said to have had collective. Klein, Martha (1995).

This is a reissue, with new introduction, of Susan Sauve Meyer's 1993 book, in which she presents a comprehensive examination of Aristotle's accounts of voluntariness in the Eudemian and Nicomachean Ethics. She makes the case that these constitute a theory of moral responsibility--albeit one with important differences from modern theories. Highlights of the discussion include a reconstruction of the dialectical argument in the Eudemian Ethics II 6-9, and a demonstration that the definitions of 'voluntary' and 'involuntary' in Nicomachean Ethics III 1 are the culmination of that argument. By identifying the paradigms of voluntariness and involuntariness that Aristotle begins with and the opponents (most notably Plato) he addresses, Meyer explains notoriously puzzling features of the Nicomachean account--such as Aristotle's requirement that involuntary agents experience pain or regret. Other familiar features of Aristotle's account are cast in a new light. That we are responsible for the characters we develop turns out not to be a necessary condition of responsible agency. That voluntary action has its "origin" in the agent and that our actions are "up to us to do and not to do"--often interpreted as implying a libertarian conception of agency--turn out to be perfectly compatible with causal determinism, a point Meyer makes by locating these locutions in the context of Aristotle's general understanding of causality. While Aristotle does not himself face or address worries that determinism is incompatible with responsibility, his causal repertoire provides the resources for a powerful response to incompatibilist arguments. On this and other fronts Aristotle's is a view to be taken seriously by theorists of moral responsibility.