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Download Posterior Analytics (Clarendon Aristotle Series) eBook

by Aristotle

Download Posterior Analytics (Clarendon Aristotle Series) eBook
ISBN:
0198240899
Author:
Aristotle
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Clarendon Press; 2 edition (March 24, 1994)
Pages:
328 pages
EPUB book:
1935 kb
FB2 book:
1560 kb
DJVU:
1493 kb
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
570


Aristotle sets out the conditions under which scientific arguments will provide true knowledge; where true conclusions are deduced from first principles and basic principles are used to explain more complex ones.

Oxford: Blackwell, 1901). Aristotle sets out the conditions under which scientific arguments will provide true knowledge; where true conclusions are deduced from first principles and basic principles are used to explain more complex ones.

The Posterior Analytics is a rather dull and uninspired work even by Aristotelian standards. Aristotle's trademarked method of pointless classification is here running at high gear at its pointless best.

Posterior analytics, . series terminates and there are primary premisses, yet these are unknowable because incapable of demonstration, which according to them is the only form of knowledge. POSTERIOR ANALYTICS, . And since thus one cannot know the primary premisses, knowledge of the conclusions which follow from them is not pure scientific knowledge nor properly knowing at all, but rests on the mere supposition that the premisses are true.

The Posterior Analytics contains some of Aristotle's most influential thoughts in logic, epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of science

The Posterior Analytics contains some of Aristotle's most influential thoughts in logic, epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of science. The first book expounds and develops the notions of a demonstrative argument and of a formal, axiomatized science; the second discusses a clusterof problems raised by the axioms or principles of such a science, and investigates in particular the theory of definition.

Start by marking Aristotle: Posterior Analytics. Clarendon Aristotle Series. as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Jonathan Barnes.

The Posterior Analytics is a text from Aristotle's Organon that deals with demonstration, definition, and scientific knowledge. The demonstration is distinguished as a syllogism productive of scientific knowledge, while the definition marked as the statement of a thing's nature,. a statement of the meaning of the name, or of an equivalent nominal formula.

Aristotle Physics: Books I and II (Clarendon Aristotle Series) Prior Analytics translated by Robin Smith ARISTOTLE Prior Analytics tran slated, with introduction, notes, and c. .

Aristotle Physics: Books I and II (Clarendon Aristotle Series). Metaphysics: Books M and N (Clarendon Aristotle Series). Aristotle: Posterior Analytics. Topica Categories and De Interpretatione (Clarendon Aristotle Series).

Posterior Analytics (two books), presenting Aristotle’s theory of scientific demonstration in his special sense. Topics (eight books), an early work, which contains a study of nondemonstrative reasoning. In history of logic: The properties of terms and discussions of fallacies.

The Posterior Analytics contains some of Aristotle's most influential thoughts in logic, epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of science. The first book expounds and develops the notions of a demonstrative argument and of a formal, axiomatized science; the second discusses a cluster of problems raised by the axioms or principles of such a science, and investigates in particular the theory of definition. This volume is intended to serve the needs of readers of Aristotle without a knowledge of Greek; for this second edition the translation has been completely rewritten, with the aims of greater elegance and greater fidelity to the Greek. The commentary elucidates and assesses Aristotle's arguments from a philosophical point of view; it has been extensively revised to take account of the scholarship of the last twenty years.
  • Thomeena
I have studied three editions of this work in an effort to understand how the translations vary in their interpretation of Aristotle's meaning. This edition is very well crafted prose but almost deceptive as it encourages you to read easily, without appreciating how well the clause structure strives to be true to something very original in this foundation of science, being the word for "knowing" at the time.
  • Binthars
Thank you!
  • Gri
What a text!
  • Goktilar
THE CLARENDON SERIES IS A GREAT ADDITION WITH THE BASIC WORKS OF ARISTOTLE BY PROFESSOR
RICHARD MCKEON A MUST!
GO BEARS
  • ALAN
The Posterior Analytics is a rather dull and uninspired work even by Aristotelian standards. Aristotle's trademarked method of pointless classification is here running at high gear at its pointless best. Although the relation between Aristotle and mathematicians such as Euclid is never made explicit in the historical record, it seems clear to me that the mathematicians owe nothing to Aristotle, and that the Posterior Analytics is an awkward attempt at saying something about the geometrical method by an outsider who is not really attuned to it. To understand the essence of the geometrical method one will be better off reading philosophers with a natural affinity with mathematics, such as Plato and Descartes. Aristotle puts it well when he says that "you should not argue about geometry among non-geometers---for those who argue poorly will escape detection" (77b). Unfortunately, generations of geometrically ignorant readers have ignored this sound advice and ended up greatly overestimating this rather trifling treatise.

Be that as it may, the essence Aristotle's view of the axiomatic-deductive method is summed up in the following sentence: "Demonstrative understanding ... must proceed from items which are true and primitive and immediate and more familiar than and prior to and explanatory of the conclusions." (71b)

Three notable consequences of this thesis are:

The axiomatic-deductive method is much more than mere logic. "There can be a deduction even if these conditions are not met, but there cannot be a demonstration---for it will not bring about understanding." (71b)

There is a fundamental distinction between "demonstrations which are said to demonstrate and those which lead to the impossible" (85a), i.e., proofs by contradiction, which must be seen as intrinsically inferior (87a).

Axioms stem from perception. "I call prior and more familiar in relation to us items which are nearer perception" (72a), so immediate perception must be the ultimate foundations of "demonstrative understanding." "We must get to know the primitives [i.e., axioms] by induction; for this is the way in which perception instills universals." (100b) However, "for the principles [i.e., axioms] a geometer as geometer should not supply arguments" (77b). Note the two coextensive words for "axiom"---indeed, "I call the same things principles and primitives" (72a), since immediately given truths and logical starting points of a deductive system should be the same thing.