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Download The Hellenistic Age: A Short History (Modern Library Chronicles) eBook

by Peter Green

Download The Hellenistic Age: A Short History (Modern Library Chronicles) eBook
ISBN:
067964279X
Author:
Peter Green
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Modern Library; 1st. Ed edition (April 3, 2007)
Pages:
240 pages
EPUB book:
1719 kb
FB2 book:
1167 kb
DJVU:
1472 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
740


Peter Green is the James R. Dougherty, J. Centennial Professor of Classics Emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin.

Peter Green is the James R. He is the author of several books, including Alexander of Macedon and The Greco-Persian Wars.

The Modern Library Chronicles are a series of short books published by the American publisher, Modern Library. Most of the books are under 150 pages in length and intended to introduce readers to a period of history. A partial list includes: The Renaissance, by Paul Johnson. Islam: A Short History, by Karen Armstrong. The Balkans, by Mark Mazower. The German Empire: 1870-1918, by Michael Stürmer. Peoples and Empires, by Anthony Pagden. Communism, by Richard Pipes.

The Hellenistic Age book .

The Hellenistic Age chronicles the years 336 to 30 BCE, a period .

The Hellenistic Age chronicles the years 336 to 30 BCE, a period that witnessed the overlap of two of antiquity’s great civilizations, the Greek and the Roman. Peter Green’s remarkably far-ranging study covers the prevalent themes and events of those centuries: the Hellenization, by Alexander’s conquests, of an immense swath of the known world; the lengthy and chaotic partition of this empire by rival Macedonian bands; the decline of the city-state as the predominant political institution; and, finally, Rome’s moment of transition from republican to. imperial rule.

The Hellenistic Age chronicles the years 336 to 30 BCE, a period that . Book in the Modern Library Chronicles Series)

The Hellenistic Age chronicles the years 336 to 30 BCE, a period that witnessed the overlap of two of antiquity’s great civilizations, the Greek and the Roman. Book in the Modern Library Chronicles Series).

Put in other terms, The Hellenistic Age traces the unfolding of Hellenistic civilization in a linear fashion, while at the same time drawing connections between successive alterations in the political, economic and social landscape of the Hellenistic East and the appearance of new cultural and intellectual perspectives.

The Modern Library Chronicles are a series of short books, most under 150 pages, intended to introduce readers to a period of history. The Hellenistic Age: A Short History, by Peter Green. A partial list includes:. A Short History of Medicine, by F. Gonzalez-Crussi. The Christian World, by Martin Marty. Prehistory, by Colin Renfrew.

Alexander and the hellenistic city. A short history of suburbia. Modern Library Chronicles. Alexandria: the first great cosmopolis. Unraveling of alexander’s vision. Onions fifty to a rope. California, Inc. (with Paul Grabowicz). Other author's books: The City: A Global History (Modern Library Chronicles Series Book 21). The City: A Global History (Modern Library Chronicles Series Book 21). Menu.

Covering three centuries of history, from the age of Alexander the Great to the rise of Rome, an engaging study of the Hellenistic period traces the influence of Greek culture on the ancient world with the establishment of Alexander's empire, the development of new political dynasties in the wake.

Covering three centuries of history, from the age of Alexander the Great to the rise of Rome, an engaging study of the Hellenistic period traces the influence of Greek culture on the ancient world with the establishment of Alexander's empire, the development of new political dynasties in the wake of his death, and the cultural, social, philosophical, and intellectual contributions of the. era. Reprint. The Hellenistic Age: A Short History (Modern Library Chronicles).

The Hellenistic era witnessed the overlap of antiquity’s two great Western civilizations, the Greek and the Roman. This was the epoch of Alexander’s vast expansion of the Greco-Macedonian world, the rise and fall of his successors’ major dynasties in Egypt and Asia, and, ultimately, the establishment of Rome as the first Mediterranean superpower.The Hellenistic Age chronicles the years 336 to 30 BCE, from the days of Philip and Alexander of Macedon to the death of Cleopatra and the final triumph of Caesar’s heir, the young Augustus. Peter Green’s remarkably far-ranging study covers the prevalent themes and events of those centuries: the Hellenization of an immense swath of the known world–from Egypt to India–by Alexander’s conquests; the lengthy and chaotic partition of this empire by rival Macedonian marshals after Alexander’s death; the decline of thepolis (city state) as the predominant political institution; and, finally, Rome’s moment of transition from republican to imperial rule.Predictably, this is a story of war and power-politics, and of the developing fortunes of art, science, and statecraft in the areas where Alexander’s coming disseminated Hellenic culture. It is a rich narrative tapestry of warlords, libertines, philosophers, courtesans and courtiers, dramatists, historians, scientists, merchants, mercenaries, and provocateurs of every stripe, spun by an accomplished classicist with an uncanny knack for infusing life into the distant past, and applying fresh insights that make ancient history seem alarmingly relevant to our own times.To consider the three centuries prior to the dawn of the common era in a single short volume demands a scholar with a great command of both subject and narrative line. The Hellenistic Age is that rare book that manages to coalesce a broad spectrum of events, persons, and themes into one brief, indispensable, and amazingly accessible survey.
  • Androlhala
This is a good, concise overview of the period from the death of Alexander in 323 BCE to the final collapse of the Ptolemaic kingdom after the Battle of Actium in 30 BCE. It is a great follow-on to read after Peter Green's excellent "Alexander of Macedon" which is an outstanding history of Alexander and his conquests. It is very readable and moves quickly through the period. The presentation is an overview, rather than a detailed history. For a more detailed history, one might try Peter Green's "From Alexander to Actium" that is about 970 pages and much more expensive.
  • Fecage
Having just read and struggled with Peter Green's much larger 1992 book on the same subject, "Alexander to Actium", I decided to read this book. I have to report that the most negative criticism about his larger book, a bothersome use of exotic foreign language phrases and rambling discussions, was much improved. His larger book focused on 25 or so topics chronologically, but this book sticks more closely to a chronologic storyline. Keep in mind that Green is considered one of the experts on the subject matter, so even though a lot of information is covered, it is high quality. The Hellenistic Era is a hot topic of research at the moment. It's a tough era to study, but clearly much important history happened during it, it ties the Greek and Roman eras together, and that is why I believe historians are giving the era another look. If you have a favorite book on the era, let me know and why. Thanks.
  • რฉςh
Great starter book for the reader who wants to discover the history of the Hellenistic Age
  • Iesha
The author attempted something quite difficult: to cover several millennia of important history told for a lay reader. Considering this I congratulate him for keep my interest throughout.
  • Samowar
Many years ago the author wrote a massive scholarly history of this era. I was always interested in the subject but too intimidated by the size of that book to start reading it. The new version is brief but not at all dumbed down. Political and military events are treated diachronically with causes and effects made apparent. A bit rushed at times, but otherwise wonderfully clear. The searchable kindle version also makes a great reference text,
  • elegant stranger
Everything Peter Green writes is worth a read.
Alexander to Actium is a magnum opus.
  • IWantYou
I thought this was supposed to be a survey for those of us not expert on the topic, so why is he dragging in 19th-Century Greek poets, and using terms nonexperts won't know? And what's with the love of foreign terms? De haut en bas, indeed! (Yes, I know what it means. But there are some terms I don't know and couldn't find, including untranslated Greek. I had Greek decades ago in college. Most readers probably never had it.) Substantively, I'd have liked more on the Seleucids. He refers to the Parthians eventually taking over while the Seleucids were having their dynastic quarrels, but doesn't go any farther on that topic. He seems much more interested in the parts taken over by Rome: Greece, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Also, the grammar is awful. Doesn't anyone copy edit anymore?
This is a deep and comprenhensive account the Hellenistic períod. A book worth reading.