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Download Racial Castration: Managing Masculinity in Asian America (Perverse Modernities: A Series Edited by Jack Halberstam and Lisa Lowe) eBook

by David L. Eng

Download Racial Castration: Managing Masculinity in Asian America (Perverse Modernities: A Series Edited by Jack Halberstam and Lisa Lowe) eBook
ISBN:
0822326361
Author:
David L. Eng
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Duke University Press Books (March 20, 2001)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1458 kb
FB2 book:
1890 kb
DJVU:
1968 kb
Other formats
mobi docx lrf lit
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
274


Racial Castration, the first book to bring together the fields of Asian American studies and psychoanalytic theory. With consummate lucidity and analytical skill, David Eng demonstrates how intimately related are Asian American identity and generic .

Racial Castration, the first book to bring together the fields of Asian American studies and psychoanalytic theory. nationality-and how central to both are the contestations of masculine subjectivity. A powerful contribution to Americanist and transnational studies, Racial Castration more generally demonstrates the potential of psychoanalytic theory as an element in rigorous social critique. Phillip Brian Harper, New York University.

Racial Castration, the first book to bring together the fields of Asian American studies . Eng's seminal study should not be ghettoized as merely a landmark text in Asian American studies, though it is that.

Racial Castration, the first book to bring together the fields of Asian American studies and psychoanalytic theory, explores the role of sexuality in racial formation and the place of race in sexual identity. David L. Eng examines images-literary, visual, and filmic-that configure past as well as contemporary perceptions of Asian American men as emasculated, homosexualized, or queer.

David L. Eng. Racial Castration, the first book to bring together the fields of Asian American studies and psychoanalytic theory, explores the role of sexuality in racial formation and the place of race in sexual identity. Eng examines images-literary, visual, and filmic-that configure past as well as contemporary perceptions of Asian American men as emasculated, homosexualized, or queer

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We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. Eng examines images-literary, visual, and filmic-that configure past as well as contemporary perceptions of Asian American men as emasculated, homosexualized, or queer

Racial Castration : Managing Masculinity in Asian America.

Racial Castration : Managing Masculinity in Asian America.

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In his recently published Racial Castration: Managing Masculinity in Asian America, David L. Eng sets himself to this task with significant results

In his recently published Racial Castration: Managing Masculinity in Asian America, David L. Eng sets himself to this task with significant results In his first chapter, Eng pairs readings of novels by Maxine Hong Kingston and Frank Chin to consider how both authors participate in a rewriting of the photographic history of American modernity-a history that has left at its specular margins the male Chinese laborers who participated in this modernization (the chapter's primary example is the construction of the transcontinental railroad).

Racial Castration, the first book to bring together the fields of Asian American studies and psychoanalytic theory, explores the role of sexuality in racial formation and the place of race in sexual identity. David L. Eng examines images—literary, visual, and filmic—that configure past as well as contemporary perceptions of Asian American men as emasculated, homosexualized, or queer.Eng juxtaposes theortical discussions of Freud, Lacan, and Fanon with critical readings of works by Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Lonny Kaneko, David Henry Hwang, Louie Chu, David Wong Louie, Ang Lee, and R. Zamora Linmark. While situating these literary and cultural productions in relation to both psychoanalytic theory and historical events of particular significance for Asian Americans, Eng presents a sustained analysis of dreamwork and photography, the mirror stage and the primal scene, and fetishism and hysteria. In the process, he offers startlingly new interpretations of Asian American masculinity in its connections to immigration exclusion, the building of the transcontinental railroad, the wartime internment of Japanese Americans, multiculturalism, and the model minority myth. After demonstrating the many ways in which Asian American males are haunted and constrained by enduring domestic norms of sexuality and race, Eng analyzes the relationship between Asian American male subjectivity and the larger transnational Asian diaspora. Challenging more conventional understandings of diaspora as organized by race, he instead reconceptualizes it in terms of sexuality and queerness.
  • Taulkree
Eng's book is a must have for anyone working in the fields of race and sexuality.
  • Mr.Twister
I agree largely and almost wholly with the previous and first independent reviewer of this book: Eng's 'Racial Castration' is at times, hyperacademic and perhaps even overly into the realm of philosophy and not social studies. Still, it is a unique, overdue work on the perception of-- and the creation of the perception of-- asian american males in mainstream American society.
I believe that Eng brings up some extremely insightful and heretofore overlooked aspects that are central to 'Asian-american male masculinity' in America. First and foremost is the concept that, as 'queerness' or the 'feminization' of the asian american male is a direct result of the white-male-as-heterosexual-masculine-hegemony. Too often, asian american masculinity and the perception of asian american men in this country deems the denunciation of homosexuality-- 'queerness'-- as essential to acceptance as part of masculine America as a whole. I don't think that any authors to this point have pointed out the inherently intimate relation and intertwining of sexuality and race in this case. To throw out acceptance of gay Asian-America as masculine merely to seek acceptance of "masculine Asian-America" as a whole is a big mistake.
I think that Eng has rightfully pointed out how 'queer' Asian-American males are often left holding the bag as their own Asian-American culture, blind to how 'American culture' as emasculated their own heterosexual men, turns around and rejects the masculinity of their own 'queer' men. And I believe that it is true: Asian American men, queer or straight, face largely the same problems of how their masculinity is perceived in America, and both groups are basically in the same boat in this regard.
Eng's deep delving-- almost reaching?-- into areas that would seemingly be a stretch to relate to his topic (mainly deep psychoanalytical and philosophical theories of the perception/acceptance/rejection of self) are somewhat difficult to grasp, but I believe that they are germane because they do largely reinforce the elusive depth at which stereotypes of asian-american masculinity are adopted, inculcated, and reinforced from outside.
I believe that Eng has quite aptly addressed his stated mission of exploring the 'Racial Castration' of Asian American men in America, and I laud 'Racial Castration' as a theoretically seminal work. It is also aptly named. The only shame is that it will almost certainly be marginalized as 'academia', as it is written to be almost completely inaccesible to the general public, i.e., the average American. And while it does attack the theoretical/philosophical problems of the perception of asian-american masculinity in America, it probably won't do very much in the way of practically addressing what IS inherently an everyday, concrete social and political issue. *Real* social change won't occur in the ivory towers of academia, but with average Americans! Still, if it raises the awareness of even a few individuals who read it, it will have gratifyingly served its purpose.
It has raised mine; and for this reason, this book is a keeper in my collection!
  • Lli
Although in some ways provocative, this book poses a question it never adequately grapples with--namely, can the "materiality" of race be properly characterized or understood as a "discursive limit" to ideological constructions of ethnicity without being understood as existing outside of discourse? It seems to me that Eng fails to address the question of whether such constructions may be regarded as either a pre- or extra-discursive "hard kernel of the Real," one the one hand, or simply another aspect of discourse, on the other hand. His work would benefit from a more thorough engagement with, and analysis of, the "objet petit a" in the work of Zizek and Lacan. Perhaps "race" in general ought to be regarded a primordial psychic "hole," an "absence" or pure negativity where a "grounding" for discourse ought to be but proves to be lacking. Unfortunately that is a proposition that Eng hints at but does not explore.
  • terostr
This book by all mean is not intended for lay-man audience. This book delve deep into psychology and the work of Freud which make it hard to follow by lay-man readers.

My advice is, do not pickup this book unless you're a college professor or have a degree in social psychology.
  • HelloBoB:D
As a student of cultural studies who is interested in limning the taxonomic and theoretical relations among the "queer," the "Asian," and the "American," I must say that I found this book rather disappointing. Eng seems to have an unerring eye for the trivial, the irrelevant, and the beside-the-point. He also seems to be unfamiliar with current scholarship that highlights the errors underlying the view of the performative subject as a figure whose agency can, in any proper sense, be seen as "entailed" by virtue of its positionality vis-a-vis the rights-bearing subject. Eng would also have benefited from consulting recent legal scholarship on the "intersectionality" of the queer Asian male (or female), as well as the "co-synthesis" produced by juxtaposing various marginalized identities.