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Download Henderson the Rain King eBook

by Saul Bellow

Download Henderson the Rain King eBook
ISBN:
0670001708
Author:
Saul Bellow
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Viking Press (January 19, 1965)
Pages:
341 pages
EPUB book:
1266 kb
FB2 book:
1632 kb
DJVU:
1498 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
227


Henderson the rain king. Saul Bellow (1915–2005) is the only novelist to receive three National book awards, for The Adventures of Augie March, Herzog, and Mr Sammler’s Planet.

Henderson the rain king. In 1975, he won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel Humboldt’s Gift. The Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to him in 1976 ‘for the human understanding and subtle analysis of contemporary culture that are combined in his work. In 1990, Mr Bellow was presented with the National Book Award Foundation Medal for distinguished contribution to American letters. He has also received the National Medal of Arts.

Henderson the Rain King (Penguin Classics).

Henderson the Rain King is a 1959 novel by Saul Bellow. The book's blend of philosophical discourse and comic adventure has helped make it one of his most enduringly popular works.

Henderson the Rain King, Saul Bellow (1915 - 2005) Bellow's glorious, spirited story of an eccentric American millionaire who finds a home of sorts in deepest Africa. Eugene Henderson is a troubled middle-aged man. Despite his riches, high social status, and physical prowess, he feels restless and unfulfilled, and harbors a spiritual void that manifests itself as an inner voice crying out I want, I want, I want. Hoping to discover what the voice wants, Henderson goes to Africa. But privately when things got very bad I often looked into books to see whether I could find some helpful words, and one day I read, The forgiveness of sins is perpetual and righteousness first is not required

Henderson the Rain King. But privately when things got very bad I often looked into books to see whether I could find some helpful words, and one day I read, The forgiveness of sins is perpetual and righteousness first is not required. This impressed me so deeply that I went around saying it to myself. But then I forgot which book it was. It was one of thousands left by my father, who had also written a number of them.

Saul Bellow in Life & Letters with Joyce Carol Oates and Benjamin Taylor - Продолжительность: 1:07:09 Arts & Ideas . Clearing Out My Bedside Books - Продолжительность: 8:21 Mayberry Bookclub Recommended for you. 8:21. Зубаревич вызвала шок у Матвиенко.

Clearing Out My Bedside Books - Продолжительность: 8:21 Mayberry Bookclub Recommended for you.

Henderson the Rain King is an effort by Saul Bellow to identify the meaning of life. In that effort he fails. The story centers around Gene Henderson, a 55 year old American millionaire who is married (for the second time) and has five children

Henderson the Rain King is an effort by Saul Bellow to identify the meaning of life. The story centers around Gene Henderson, a 55 year old American millionaire who is married (for the second time) and has five children. Still he is not satisfied and keeps saying, "I need, I need" To find the answer he leaves his wife and family and goes to Africa where he has a lot of adventures that are improbable and show Bellow's bigotry toward Africa. In the end he does not find what he apparently needs and goes home.

Aggrieved, worn-out, all but defeated he longs to set things straight. Following the promptings of his unforgettable inner voice- I want, I want, I want -our hero finds himself in Africa. Henderson makes his way into a mythic sun-baked interior, where among exotic tribes he finds fellow seekers, teachers and soulmates.

His lips stretched far forward and the muscles jumped under his skin while his moaning voice rose from the greatest depths. That's right, Romilayu," I said, "pray. Pour it on. Pray like anything. Pray like anything ve it everything you've got. Come on, Romilayu, pray, I tell yo. He didn't seem to me to be putting enough into it, and I flabbergasted him altogether by getting out of bed in the green silk drawers and kneeling beside him on the floor to join him in prayer

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Bellow's glorious, spirited story of an eccentric American millionaire who finds a home of sorts in deepest Africa.
  • Berkohi
I've read the negative reviews on here, and I can't really wrap my mind around them. This book is intensely quotable, intimately relatable, and - at points - hilarious. Henderson (narrator / main character) is both hyper-aware of himself and utterly oblivious to the connection between his actions and their results. He seems a creature of the now as much as anything. He seems to come to, at 50+ years of age, to realize that he is a stranger to life, stranger to himself, asleep in his spirit, and it becomes monumentally important to him to "burst the spirit's sleep" before he submits to decay and death.

This book does not have our modern sensibilities vis a vis race, colonialism, classism, etc. Saul Bellow was a creature of his time, too. So, for the modern reader it is likely to grate and gnaw at those sensibilities. But still, if you read it, you may also find an apt exploration of the forces that drive us through life, of how we confront aging and death, how we create ourselves in real time based on the models we have around us, how we come to face the cumulative ledger of our decisions years after we've made them. I loved this book and highly recommend it to anyone who has lived a certain amount of life - who has confronted loss, confronted death, confronted disappointment. You may find some mirror here.
  • Ueledavi
If you are looking to have some fun reading the work of a Nobel Laureate, look no further. The book is wacky,wild and wonderfully written. Henderson is a John Wayne big man, a brave soldier, an accidental heir to a fortune, an inept husband, father and pig farmer and a bit of a schnook. But he is also a brave adventurer and most importantly a searcher. He is seeking something that will lift him out of the banality of his life and his feelings of fecklessness. He decides that a trip to deepest Africa is just the thing. Once he goes, it's Indiana Jones meets Alice meets Heart of (not so) Darkness. There is plenty to think about here, as you would expect, and there is plenty to smile about too. An interested reader needs nothing else.
  • Early Waffle
So I was annoyed and didn't really like the protagonist which is how I think you're supposed to feel. I've traveled a lot and come across this type of character before - Bellow describes him perfectly. It's that guy who talks without thinking, who is sentimental and dumb and foolish (not book dumb but life dumb), and you're just so annoyed if you're on the same bus with him going across a country. Which was why I wanted to quit reading the book because the character annoyed me so much (and that is testimony in and of itself of a good book), but I persevered and am glad I did. The questions the protagonists raises and the way Bellow slowly reveals without directly stating anything is amazing. Ravelstein was quiet and Henderson is so loud it's quite hard to hear anything else, but if you listen closely you hear the real meaning and get what Bellow is trying to tell you and Henderson, if only you'd and Henderson stop shouting so loudly asking for an answer and an explanation and keep quiet long enough to hear it.
  • Jonide
Gene Henderson, a 50-something millionaire living in 1950s America, decides to take a trip to Africa to try to quiet the voice inside him that keeps saying, "I want, I want." Since Henderson already has everything material he could want, he can't find any way to satisfy that voice, and as he has already tried several other things prior to his African trip, he doesn't hold out much hope. But it becomes a very strange trip - for only in a very strange place could he find what he actually needs.
I can't read Bellow's mind, of course, but as I read his book, Henderson represents America - huge, crude, often well-meaning but sometimes causing unintentional destruction. Bellow's imaginary Africa would then be the entire developing world - or even the whole world outside America. It's hard to like Henderson at first; even his own first-person narration casts him in a bad light despite his high opinion of himself. As his attempts to help the people in the first tribe he meets end in catastrophe, he definitely seems to represent the American ignorance and arrogance that led to so many disastrous overseas projects in the 1950s and 1960s. Subdued by his first failure, Henderson allows himself to learn from the second tribe, and although he ultimately barely escapes with his life, he comes away with the inner peace he had sought, with a new wisdom, and with a determination to become a healer. The message seems pretty obvious - a call for a wiser America dedicating itself to higher goals.
An alternative way to read it makes Henderson representative of anyone who no longer has to work for a living and who searches for something to give life meaning. This should resonate with any young dot com millionaire as much as with any healthy retired person. In that interpretation, Henderson learns that just because you don't have to work doesn't mean that you shouldn't work and that to be ennobling, work must be helpful to someone else - not all activity suffices - and not meant to glorify yourself either.
Either way, the book reads smoothly and moves along briskly. Read it long enough to get past your initial dislike of Henderson, and it will reward your efforts.