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Download African History: A Very Short Introduction eBook

by Richard Rathbone,John Parker

Download African History: A Very Short Introduction eBook
ISBN:
0192802488
Author:
Richard Rathbone,John Parker
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (May 1, 2007)
Pages:
144 pages
EPUB book:
1170 kb
FB2 book:
1409 kb
DJVU:
1239 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
634


John Parker teaches African history at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Like many of the OUP "Very Short Introduction" series, you can't really tell what the book is about from the title

John Parker teaches African history at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Like many of the OUP "Very Short Introduction" series, you can't really tell what the book is about from the title. This is not a survey of African history, but rather a survey of how historians, political leaders and others have interpreted African history.

This Very Short Introduction looks at Africa's past and reflects on the changing ways it has been imagined and represented, both in Africa and beyond

This Very Short Introduction looks at Africa's past and reflects on the changing ways it has been imagined and represented, both in Africa and beyond. The author illustrates important aspects of Africa's history with a range of fascinating historical examples, drawn from over 5 millennia across this vast continent. The multitude of topics that the reader will learn about in this succinct work include the unity and diversity of African cultures, slavery, religion, colonial conquest, the diaspora, and the importance of history in understanding contemporary Africa

Like many of the OUP "Very Short Introduction" series, you can't really tell what the book is about from the title.

Like many of the OUP "Very Short Introduction" series, you can't really tell what the book is about from the title. colonialists created an African history - or pretended there wasn't one - that would best serve the cause of colonialism. That is, if Africa is seen as a land of primitive, savage tribes, the colonial powers could defend their actions as just spreading civilization.

John Parker teaches African history at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Richard Rathbone is Honorary Professor of History in the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, and Emeritus Professor in History at the School of Oriental and African Studies. He specializes in the history of Ghana and is the author of Making the Town: Ga State and Society in Early Colonial Accra (2000) and (with Jean Allman) Tongnaab: The History of a West African God (2005). He has written on south and west Africa and his books include Ghana (1992), Murder and politics in colonial Ghana (1993) and Nkrumah and the chiefs (2000).

John Parker and Richard Rathbone. AFRICAN HISTORY A Very Short Introduction. This page intentionally left blank. Chapter 1 The idea of Africa. This book is a very short introduction to a very big topic. In fact, it is a very short introduction to two very big topics. On the one hand, it is about a place and its people: Africa. On the other, it is about the past of that place, as it has been envisaged by Africans and written about by historians.

Электронная книга "African History: A Very Short Introduction", John Parker, Richard Rathbone. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "African History: A Very Short Introduction" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

African History book. African History: A Very Short Introduction. Very Short Introductions). This Very Short Introduction looks at Africa's past and reflects on the changing ways it has been imagined and represented, both in Africa and beyond. Nov 25, 2016 Shawn Mooney (Shawn The Book Maniac) rated it it was amazing.

John Parker, Richard Rathbone

John Parker, Richard Rathbone. The book examines questions such as: Who invented the idea of "Africa"? How is African history pieced together, given such a lack of documentary evidence? How did Africa interact with the world 1,000 years ago? Africa has been known as 'the cradle of mankind', and its recoverable history stretches back to the Pharaohs.

John Parker, Richard Rathbone

John Parker, Richard Rathbone. Essential reading for anyone interested in the African continent and the diversity of human history, this Very Short Introduction looks at Africa's past and reflects on the changing ways it has been imagined and represented. Key themes in current thinking about Africa's history are illustrated with a range of fascinating historical examples, drawn from over 5 millennia across this vast continent. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area.

by John Parker, Richard Rathbone. series Very Short Introductions. Books related to African History: A Very Short Introduction. The Lord of the Rings. Empire:A Very Short Introduction.

This Very Short Introduction looks at Africa's past and reflects on the changing ways it has been imagined and represented, both in Africa and beyond. The author illustrates important aspects of Africa's history with a range of fascinating historical examples, drawn from over 5 millennia across this vast continent. The multitude of topics that the reader will learn about in this succinct work include the unity and diversity of African cultures, slavery, religion, colonial conquest, the diaspora, and the importance of history in understanding contemporary Africa. The book examines questions such as: Who invented the idea of "Africa"? How is African history pieced together, given such a lack of documentary evidence? How did Africa interact with the world 1,000 years ago?Africa has been known as 'the cradle of mankind', and its recoverable history stretches back to the Pharaohs. But the idea of studying African history is itself new, and the authors show why it is still contested and controversial. This VSI, the first concise work of its kind, will prove essential reading for anyone interested in the African continent and the diversity of human history.
  • Cells
Appearance: True to its name, this is a small pocket sized book from Oxford with a good and sturdy thick cover.

Content: If you want a standard, linear progression of the African continent, you must walk away. This book is an small academic companion to african historical studies. Not intending to ACTUALLY speak on African history, the authors rather discuss the many problems, theories and experiences of scholars studying African history. It is an AMAZING read and it lifted the proverbial veil from my eyes. I have since gone on to deepen my knowledge of the academic study of history and its many quandries. A good read for any budding academic, geek, African Studies minor, major, student or interested persons.

Categories: African Studies, History.

I fully recommend this.
  • Arashigore
Buy this book because it accomplishes the two prime goals of the state of African history at present anyway: information and agency. The “what” and the “who says” of the discipline which has emerged in our life time (as in “Who high jacked our Africa?”). For example, chapter one is titled “The idea of Africa” and has several subheadings such as “The invention of Africa” before going into more traditional headings such as “The lie of the land.” The last chapter is “Memory and Forgetting.” The usual information is related, and the bibliography is fantastic. All in 160 pages. Remembering how hard it is to write a good 500-word paper, the briefness of the book puts premium on content and deft phrasing. This volume is one of over 200 titles in the series, http://www.veryshortintroductions.com/. Did I say “Buy this book”?
  • Bludworm
Like many of the OUP "Very Short Introduction" series, you can't really tell what the book is about from the title. This is not a survey of African history, but rather a survey of how historians, political leaders and others have interpreted African history. E.g., colonialists created an African history -- or pretended there wasn't one -- that would best serve the cause of colonialism. That is, if Africa is seen as a land of primitive, savage tribes, the colonial powers could defend their actions as just spreading civilization. Conversely, post-colonialists have often created a nationalistic view of African countries that did not exist prior to the European powers marking arbitary lines on their maps.

The authors take pains to note that any statement about Africa as a whole is likely an over-generalization. The history of the Congo area, for instance, is considerably different from that of South Africa. Yet, as diverse as the regions are, the authors assert that the concept of "Africa" shouldn't be abandoned.

The whole subject of African history is a difficult one for historians, or anyone, because of the lack of sources. What we know of African cities like Timbuktu is essentially what travelers wrote about them. Often, the African climate has worked to eradicate the records of what might have been there prior to 19th century European colonization. Even oral history is suspect, as oral histories are subject to change over time. This makes it difficult for those attempting to decolonize Africa to actually figure out what a particular African region was like prior to colonization. For once colonization began, the nature of the region might have changed drastically. For instance, the 1996 Rwanda genocide of the Hutu against the Tutsi is not, as depicted in Western media, a struggle between two tribes. The difference between the Hutu and the Tutsi -- genetically the same -- entirely stems from how these people were treated by German and Belgian colonialists, creating an artificial division between them that continued and worsened even after the Europeans were long gone. (It occurs to me as I write this, that this is somewhat similar to the aftermath of Ottoman colonization of Southern Slavs.)

But while African history can't escape concentrating on the effects of colonialism, the authors cover other areas, e.g., the participation of African states in the slave trade -- possibly as many slaves went East as went across the Atlantic, and many slaves were transferred internally only. African history can't be discussed without discussing the slave trade, but the authors warn that there was a lot going on at the time not related to the slave trade, so it's a mistake to think of Africa as a continent of victims.

History has always been more about interpretation than facts, and that's particularly true in the case of Africa.

If you plan on reading any African history, or just want to understand the background of current African political issues, this book will provide needed perspective.
  • Leceri
Africa is large and complex and African history is that multiplied many times. There was nothing easy or obvious in the topics covered by author, it all involved great scholarship and mastery of the subject. History and historiography were discussed with just enough background so the person with a casual backround could understand but also with enough depth that provided serious learning for the reader. The book dealt with a variety of topics some which I had little background or interest in, but I found them all well worth reading about.
  • Gabar
This slim volume presents an extremely broad brush of the major points of African history, Details pop up to illustrate a point, but the mail thrust is the overall influence (if any) of climate, geography, tribal custom, colonialization, religion, and mineral wealth on history, and how we got to modern Aftrica. If you are interested in a particular region, people, or event, you'll need to check other works, but this is the big picture well presented and well written.
  • Unh
As the title suggests, this is not an in depth study of the entire continent's history, but an interesting look at how historians and others have thought about and used the history of African nations and peoples for a variety of purposes over time.
  • Yananoc
I agree with previous reviewers. It helped me teach my Advanced Placement World History students about the themes and opportunities of African History.
I was a bit disappointed in this book, as I had been hoping for a summary of the history of Africa. Instead, I found I had purchased a history of the writing of African history. While major trends in the history of Africa were discussed, and as an amateur historian the delvings into how perceptions of African history have changed over the years was still interesting, I found myself thinking at the end...now what I really would like is to read a history of Africa.