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Download Sheltering Art: Collecting and Social Identity in Early Eighteenth-Century Paris eBook

by Rochelle Ziskin

Download Sheltering Art: Collecting and Social Identity in Early Eighteenth-Century Paris eBook
ISBN:
0271037857
Author:
Rochelle Ziskin
Category:
Humanities
Language:
English
Publisher:
Penn State University Press; 1 edition (August 16, 2012)
Pages:
392 pages
EPUB book:
1806 kb
FB2 book:
1219 kb
DJVU:
1109 kb
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
839


In Sheltering Art, Rochelle Ziskin explores private art collecting, a primary facet of that newly decentralized artistic realm and one increasingly embraced by an expanding social elite as the century wore on. During the key period when Paris reclaimed its role as the nexus of cultural an. .

In Sheltering Art, Rochelle Ziskin explores private art collecting, a primary facet of that newly decentralized artistic realm and one increasingly embraced by an expanding social elite as the century wore on. During the key period when Paris reclaimed its role as the nexus of cultural and social life, two rival circles of art collectors-with dissonant goals and disparate conceptions of modernity-competed for preeminence. Sheltering Art focuses on these collectors, their motivations for collecting art, and the natures of their collections

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In Sheltering Art, Rochelle Ziskin explores the rise of private art collecting

In Sheltering Art, Rochelle Ziskin explores the rise of private art collecting. Sheltering Art focuses on these collectors, their motivations for collecting art, and the natures of their collections

University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2012.

Sheltering Art: Collecting and Social Identity in Early Eighteenth-Century Paris. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2012.

In Sheltering Art, Rochelle Ziskin explores private art collecting, a.Rochelle Ziskin brings to life the world of art collecting and its role in defining political and personal allegiances in early eighteenth-century Paris.

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Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians Vol. 56 No. 1, Ma. 1997 (pp. 105-106) DOI: 1. 307/991224. Find this author on Google Scholar.

Rochelle Ziskin (2012). Sheltering Art: Collecting and Social Identity in Early Eighteenth-century Paris. WorldCat Identities (via VIAF):.

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Rochelle Ziskin, Sheltering Art: Collecting and Social. Identity in Early Eighteenth-Century Paris

Rochelle Ziskin, Sheltering Art: Collecting and Social. Identity in Early Eighteenth-Century Paris  . All AMS books are printed on acid-free paper that meets the guidelines for performance and durability of the Committee on Production Guidelines for Book Longevity of the Council on Library Resources. Ams press, inc. Brooklyn Navy Yard, 63 Flushing Ave.

The turn of the eighteenth century was a period of transition in France, a time when new but contested concepts of modernity emerged in virtually every cultural realm. The rigidity of the state’s consolidation of the arts in the late seventeenth century yielded to a more vibrant and diverse cultural life, and Paris became, once again, the social and artistic capital of the wealthiest nation in Europe. In Sheltering Art, Rochelle Ziskin explores private art collecting, a primary facet of that newly decentralized artistic realm and one increasingly embraced by an expanding social elite as the century wore on. During the key period when Paris reclaimed its role as the nexus of cultural and social life, two rival circles of art collectors—with dissonant goals and disparate conceptions of modernity—competed for preeminence. Sheltering Art focuses on these collectors, their motivations for collecting art, and the natures of their collections. An ambitious study, it employs extensive archival research in its examination of the ideologies associated with different strategies of collecting in eighteenth-century Paris and how art collecting was inextricably linked to the shaping of social identities.