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Download Jungle Laboratories: Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of the Pill eBook

by Gabriela Soto Laveaga

Download Jungle Laboratories: Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of the Pill eBook
ISBN:
0822345870
Author:
Gabriela Soto Laveaga
Category:
Medicine & Health Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Duke University Press Books; 1 edition (December 23, 2009)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1395 kb
FB2 book:
1573 kb
DJVU:
1471 kb
Other formats
doc lit azw rtf
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
470


Jungle Laboratories book.

Jungle Laboratories book. Chapter three, Discovering and Gathering the New ‘Green Gold,’ describes how locals became aware of the barbasco trade and how they learned to track and harvest the hormone rich yam.

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Электронная книга "Jungle Laboratories: Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of the Pill", Gabriela Soto Laveaga

Электронная книга "Jungle Laboratories: Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of the Pill", Gabriela Soto Laveaga. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Jungle Laboratories: Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of the Pill" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The effect of the laboratory and pilot process conditions of the aerobic bioconversion of brown coals on the elemental composition and technical characteristics of the organic matter of the resulting biologically processed coals is reported.

Jungle Laboratories: Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of The Pill

Jungle Laboratories: Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of The Pill. Duke University Press, 2009), winner, 2010 Robert K. Merton Best Book Award in Science, Knowledge and Technology from the American Sociological Association.

Adapted from her dissertation, historian Gabriela Laveaga’s fascinating book fills in this crucial history and demonstrates, as other historians of science have recently done, that scientific discovery and knowledge production is not limited to trained scientists in sterile laboratories.

This work is an important contribution to the history of science, state formation, post-1940s Mexico, and to the study of Echevarria's presidency

This part of the Pill's history, Soto Laveaga argues, was so successfully erased from .

This part of the Pill's history, Soto Laveaga argues, was so successfully erased from collective memory that even the rural culture in Oaxaca has forgotten its role in one of the most important scientific breakthroughs in recent history. The author's efforts to reinsert the role of barbasco pickers and rural Mexicans in 20th-century science is just the beginning, however, of her more nuanced argument that this same rural population was central to the Mexican's government's efforts to nationalize barbasco, as well as part of a political movement in which rural Mexicans made.

Her first book, Jungle Laboratories: Mexican Peasants, National Projects and the Making of the Pill, won the Robert K. Merton Best Book prize in Science, Knowledge . Merton Best Book prize in Science, Knowledge, and Technology Studies from the American Sociological Association. Her second monograph, Sanitizing Rebellion: Physician Strikes, Public Health and Repression in Twentieth Century Mexico, examines the role of healthcare providers as both critical actors in the formation of modern states and as social agitators. Introduction, Special Issue on Sciences from Over There, History and Technology, 34:1, 2018: 5-10.

Gabriela Soto Laveaga. Preface ix Acknowledgments xi Introduction 1 1. The Papaloapan, Poverty, and a Wild Yam 23 2. Mexican Peasants, a Foreign Chemist, and the Mexican Father of the Pill 39 3. Discovering and Gathering the New "Green Gold" 71 4. Patents, Compounds, and Steroid-Making Peasants 91 5. A Yam, Students, and a Populist Project 113 6. The State Takes Control of Barbasco: The. Emergence of Proquivemex (1974-1976) 133 7. Proquivemex and Transnational Steroid Laboratories 151 8. Barbasqueros into Mexicans 16. ONTINUE READING

In the 1940s chemists discovered that barbasco, a wild yam indigenous to Mexico, could be used to mass-produce synthetic steroid hormones. Barbasco spurred the development of new drugs, including cortisone and the first viable oral contraceptives, and positioned Mexico as a major player in the global pharmaceutical industry. Yet few people today are aware of Mexico’s role in achieving these advances in modern medicine. In Jungle Laboratories, Gabriela Soto Laveaga reconstructs the story of how rural yam pickers, international pharmaceutical companies, and the Mexican state collaborated and collided over the barbasco. By so doing, she sheds important light on a crucial period in Mexican history and challenges us to reconsider who can produce science.

Soto Laveaga traces the political, economic, and scientific development of the global barbasco industry from its emergence in the 1940s, through its appropriation by a populist Mexican state in 1970, to its obsolescence in the mid-1990s. She focuses primarily on the rural southern region of Tuxtepec, Oaxaca, where the yam grew most freely and where scientists relied on local, indigenous knowledge to cultivate and harvest the plant. Rural Mexicans, at first unaware of the pharmaceutical and financial value of barbasco, later acquired and deployed scientific knowledge to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies, lobby the Mexican government, and ultimately transform how urban Mexicans perceived them. By illuminating how the yam made its way from the jungles of Mexico, to domestic and foreign scientific laboratories where it was transformed into pills, to the medicine cabinets of millions of women across the globe, Jungle Laboratories urges us to recognize the ways that Mexican peasants attained social and political legitimacy in the twentieth century, and positions Latin America as a major producer of scientific knowledge.

  • Iraraeal
Professor Soto-Laveaga successfully marries studies that, at first glance, appear to have little to do with each other. Yet, she convinces us that the means by which Mexican peasants hunted, processed, and sold tubers was not only scientific, but integral to the development of economically viable synthetic hormones. She raises important questions. Who produces knowledge? Where does science come from? How do human beings experience science differently? Further, she does all of this within a compelling global history of a commodity. Not to mention that I got a crash course in the history of this region. Sure, there are some portions that are stronger than others and minor imperfections here and there, but overall this is a must read for those interested in science, medicine, and globalization.
  • Murn
I appreciate that I received my item in a timely manner despite the holiday shipping rush. The book had a nice note inside wishing me happy holidays and I would like to do the same to the seller! Thank you for the book!
  • Avarm
Jungle Laboratories is an engaging and fascinating study of a non-traditional commodity, barbasco. Clearly written and carefully researched, this book shows us the multiple ways in which transnational pharmaceutical companies' demand eventually transformed living and working conditions in the Mexican countryside. The book provides a unique window into the history of post-revolutionary Mexico, and it is a very accessible reading not only for students and academics but also for people interested in the historical interplay of science, states, and local communities. My students and I have always enjoyed reading and discussing Jungle Laboratories, and I highly recommend it.
  • Fiarynara
I used it in a class on commodities. Students liked the first 5 chapters and not the last 4. I think the story is unique compared to other standards on things like sugar or tobacco.

I think the reviewer (anahuac) that points out that this is a great story but needed some editing for clarity (and I would add brevity) is on the money.

The reviewer (vergara) that loved the book so much (also a UC San Diego grad - like the author ...) is right on the money about the research.
  • BlackHaze
The author takes an interesting topic, blends it with prose as dry as the Atacama, mixes it about with some poor organization and we have a fairly functional and standard academic history. A glaring example of the weak writing meeting the organizational problems is that the book relies on sub-headings for sections that are at times one paragraph long. Really? No editor at Duke could say "try using some transitions" instead of tossing in sub-heads like they were sprinkles on sundae.

But again, the thesis, the evidence, and the importance of the argument are really very interesting, and I would have loved to have seen this in the hands of a far better writer. Students I read this with universally liked the topic but disliked the writing. Too bad.
  • Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
Quick delivery and exactly what I needed.