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Download An Antigen Depository of the Immune System: Follicular Dendritic Cells (Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology) eBook

by Marie H. Kosco-Vilbois

Download An Antigen Depository of the Immune System: Follicular Dendritic Cells (Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology) eBook
ISBN:
3540590137
Author:
Marie H. Kosco-Vilbois
Category:
Medicine & Health Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Springer; 1 edition (September 19, 1995)
Pages:
209 pages
EPUB book:
1437 kb
FB2 book:
1813 kb
DJVU:
1101 kb
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Rating:
4.3
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159


Follicular dendritic cells (FOe) are unique among cells of the immune system. While their morphological characteristics re­ sulted in their inclusion as a 'dendritic cell type', tt1ey differ quite significantly from the other members of the dendritic cell family. In contrast to T-cell-associated.

Follicular dendritic cells (FOe) are unique among cells of the immune system.

Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in. .Immune-Complex Trapping – The Cardinal Function of FDCs.

Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in germinal centers of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs (SLOs and TLOs). There, they play a crucial role in B-cell activation and affinity maturation of antibodies. FDCs have the unique capacity to bind and retain native antigen in B-cell follicles for long periods of time. Mechanisms of Antigen Delivery to FDCs. A common observation was that even though most of the antigen was endocytosed by phagocytic cells, some remained extracellularly on the surface of cells, whose identity was obscure at that time.

Each timely volume contains a wealth of information on the featured subject

Each timely volume contains a wealth of information on the featured subject.

Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a separate population of dendritic cells that present opsonized . Components of the Immune System.

Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a separate population of dendritic cells that present opsonized antigen to B cells and are likely a key player in antigen presentation. Antigen-presenting follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are mainly found in the two deeper zones, and cell death by apoptosis occurs primarily in the basal light zone, where tingible body macrophages are also located. iv) Follicular Dendritic Cells.

Follicular dendritic cells (FOe) are unique among cells of the immune system Series: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology 201. File: PDF, 1. 6 MB. Читать онлайн. The cardinal feature of FOe is to trap and retain antigen on the surface of their dendritic processes for extended amounts of time and it is this feature that provides the conceptual compo­ nent for the title of this book. Series: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology 201.

Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are cells of the immune system found in primary and secondary lymph follicles of the B cell areas of the lymphoid tissue. These cells were first described in 1965 and, although they have a very dendritic morphology, are not dendritic cells (DCs). Unlike DCs, FDCs are not derived from the bone-marrow hematopoietic stem cell, but are of mesenchymal origin.

An Antigen Depository Of The Immune System: FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS (Current Topics in Microbiology & Immunology). 1995, SPRINGER-VERLAG. Libraries near you: WorldCat.

Cells of the Immune System. monocytes, which further differentiate into dendritic cells and macrophages. 09 Plasma cells are the immune cells that are responsible for secreting antibodies, 00:01:47. 10 an important component of adaptive immunity. 05 Natural killer cells are cytotoxic cells of the innate immune system. 10 They detect virus-infected cells and kill them. 02 Dendritic cells are a specialized type of phagocytic cell 00:03:24. 10 that bridges innate and adaptive immunity. 14 Macrophages are tissue resident phagocytic cells.

Antigen-Presenting Cells. Lymphocytes are the principal cell players in the adaptive immune response. B lymphocytes (B cells). T lymphocytes (T cells). Natural killer (NK) cells. Most of these cells are found in the blood. Most dendritic cells are part of the myeloid lineage of hematopoietic cells and arise from a precursor that can also differentiate into monocytes but not granulocytes. They represent 20% to 40% of circulating white blood cells and 99% of cells in the lymph. Lymphocytes can be broadly subdivided into three major populations on the basis of functional and phenotypic differences: B lymphocytes (B cells).

Dendritic cells (DCs), named for their probing, ‘tree-like’ or dendritic shapes, are responsible for the initiation of adaptive immune responses and hence function as the ‘sentinels’ of the immune system. Paul Langerhans first described DCs in human skin in 1868 but thought they were cutaneous nerve cells. DCs are bone marrow (BM)-derived leukocytes and are the most potent type of antigen-presenting cells. They can also be propagated in vitro from BM and blood using various combinations of growth factors, such as granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and Flt3 ligand.

Follicular dendritic cells (FOe) are unique among cells of the immune system. While their morphological characteristics re­ sulted in their inclusion as a 'dendritic cell type', tt1ey differ quite significantly from the other members of the dendritic cell family. In contrast to T-cell-associated dendritic cells or the Langerhans cells found in the skin, FOe reside in highly organized B cell follicles within secondary lymphoid tissues. This site of resi­ dence provided a nomenclature committee in 1982 with the second descriptive factor for the derivation of their name. The cardinal feature of FOe is to trap and retain antigen on the surface of their dendritic processes for extended amounts of time and it is this feature that provides the conceptual compo­ nent for the title of this book. In response to an antigenic challenge, primary B cell follicles undergo dynamic events, giving rise to germinal centers which are associated with activation, expansion, and differentiation processes of B cells. The interactions of B cells with Foe and T cells in the germinal centers are essential for generating the complete repertoire of antibody isotypes obtained during an antibody response. In addition, stimuli either initiated or main­ tained during the germinal center reponse leads to production of high affinity antibodies through the processes of somatic muta­ tion and clonal selection. In this context, FOe act as a pivotal source of antigen. They accumulate foreign proteins (e. g.