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Download Protein Blood Group Antigens of the Human Red Cell: Structure, Function, and Clinical Significance (The Johns Hopkins Series in Hematology/Oncology) eBook

by Dr. Peter C. Agre MD,Dr. Jean-Pierre Cartron PhD

Download Protein Blood Group Antigens of the Human Red Cell: Structure, Function, and Clinical Significance (The Johns Hopkins Series in Hematology/Oncology) eBook
ISBN:
0801844932
Author:
Dr. Peter C. Agre MD,Dr. Jean-Pierre Cartron PhD
Category:
Medicine & Health Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Johns Hopkins University Press; First Edition edition (September 1, 1992)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1605 kb
FB2 book:
1256 kb
DJVU:
1218 kb
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Rating:
4.4
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388


Read by Peter C. Agre. Function, and Clinical Significance (The Johns Hopkins Series in Hematology/Oncology). Be the first to ask a question about Protein Blood Group Antigens of the Human Red Cell.

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PDF Erythrocyte blood group antigens are macromolecules structures . located on the extracellular surface of the red blood cell membrane. Cartron JP, et al. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular

PDF Erythrocyte blood group antigens are macromolecules structures located on the extracellular surface of the red blood cell membrane. The development of molecular studies allowed the recognition of. more than 250 antigens by the International Society for Blood. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular. domains of the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines: characterization of antibody and chemokine binding sites.

Other aspects of the red cell blood groups as they pertain to certain disease states are mentioned and in some instances . Much has been learned about human genetics from studies on how the blood group antigens are inherited.

Other aspects of the red cell blood groups as they pertain to certain disease states are mentioned and in some instances brief details about the biochemistry, genetics, serology and immunology of the blood group systems are given in an attempt to make the role of these systems in transfusion therapy more comprehensible. While the stress of the chapter is placed on the role of the blood groups in transfusion, the contributions made from study of the blood groups, in other areas of science, should not be forgotten

The blood group antigens are not restricted solely to red cells or even to hematopoietic tissues. Blood group antigens are present on glycolipid and glycoprotein molecules of the red cell membrane.

The blood group antigens are not restricted solely to red cells or even to hematopoietic tissues. The antigens of the ABO system are widely distributed throughout the tissues and have been unequivocally identified on platelets and white cells (both lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes) and in skin, the epithelial (lining) cells of the gastrointestinal tract, the kidney, the urinary tract, and the lining of the blood vessels. Evidence for the presence of the antigens of other blood group systems on cells other than red cells is less well substantiated.

ISBT Blood Group Collections Usefulness of the effect of enzymes and DTT on antigens in antibody .

ISBT Blood Group Collections. ISBT 700 Series of Low-Incidence Antigens. ISBT 901 Series of High-Incidence Antigens. SECTION II: The Blood Group Systems and Antigens. ABO. ABO Blood Group System. Usefulness of the effect of enzymes and DTT on antigens in antibody identification. Effect of acid on antigen expression. Effect of chloroquine diphosphate on antigen expression.

In addition to the defined human blood group systems, there are erythrocyte antigens which do not meet the definition of a blood group system. Most of these are either nearly universal in human blood or extremely rare and are rarely significant in a clinical setting. Reagents to test for these antigens are difficult to find and many cannot be purchased commercially.

Blood group antigens are surface markers on the outside of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane. Blood group antigens and their corresponding antibodies are an extremely important aspect of clinical blood banking and form the basis for compatibility testing in transfusion. They are proteins and carbohydrates attached to lipid or protein. A model for the types of membrane components carrying blood group antigens is shown in Figure . These antigens/antibodies also play important roles in HDFN.

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a diffusion barrier, which impedes influx of most compounds from blood to brain. Three cellular elements of the brain microvasculature compose the BBB-endothelial cells, astrocyte end-feet, and pericytes (PCs)

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a diffusion barrier, which impedes influx of most compounds from blood to brain. Three cellular elements of the brain microvasculature compose the BBB-endothelial cells, astrocyte end-feet, and pericytes (PCs). Tight junctions (TJs), present between the cerebral endothelial cells, form a diffusion barrier, which selectively excludes most blood-borne substances from entering the brain.

Crossmatching of donor red blood cells (RBCs) and .

Crossmatching of donor red blood cells (RBCs) and recipient’s serum is an important step required to complete pretransfusion tests. Crossmatch can be performed electronically or by an immediate-spin method, in which no incubation or anti-human globulin (AHG) steps are performed. major functions are to speed up the rate of antigen-antibody association, promoting a higher rate of antibody uptake by RBCs in a shorter time.

The Blood Grouping Reagent contained on this card could be controlled by. .Protein blood group antigens of the human red cell. Structure, function and clinical significance.

The Blood Grouping Reagent contained on this card could be controlled by testing Rh(+) and Rh(-) samples. Each reagent is satisfactory for use if positive and. negative samples react as expected. A red blood cell concentration or suspension medium different from that recommended. Incomplete resuspension of the red blood cells. Sample hemolysis prior to testing. Contamination between microtubes through pipetting errors. Use of procedure other than the one described above. The John Hopkins University Press 1992.

Although much has been written about the serology of blood group antigens - particularly in the context of blood banking - recent scientific advances has substantially increased our knowledge. Noted researchers and clinicians here review the newest data on the molecular structure and function of the major blood group antigens and examine their pathology and relationship to blood disease. Of particular interest to hematologists, blood bank professionals, and molecuclar biologists and geneticists.