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Download The Mermaid's Tale: Four Billion Years of Cooperation in the Making of Living Things eBook

by Anne V. Buchanan,Kenneth M. Weiss

Download The Mermaid's Tale: Four Billion Years of Cooperation in the Making of Living Things eBook
ISBN:
0674031938
Author:
Anne V. Buchanan,Kenneth M. Weiss
Category:
Science & Mathematics
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harvard University Press; First Edition (1st printing) edition (February 15, 2009)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1110 kb
FB2 book:
1277 kb
DJVU:
1376 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
467


Kenneth M. Weiss (Author), Anne V. Buchanan (Author). Weiss and Buchanan have written an elementary introduction to evolutionary and developmental biology that is not suited for the classroom, but rather for casual reading by the intelligent layperson

Kenneth M. ISBN-13: 978-0674031937. Why is ISBN important? ISBN. Weiss and Buchanan have written an elementary introduction to evolutionary and developmental biology that is not suited for the classroom, but rather for casual reading by the intelligent layperson. Their claim to fame is that it stresses cooperation rather than competition, and development as well as evolution. The book is beauitifully produced and nicely written. The figures are instructive, and it gets away without any serious genetics or population dynamics.

Kenneth M. Weiss is the Evan Pugh Professor of Anthropology and . The Mermaid's Tale: Four Billion Years of Cooperation in the Making of Living Things. Ken Weiss; Anne Buchanan; Holly Dunsworth; Dan Parker. Weiss is the Evan Pugh Professor of Anthropology and Genetics and Science at the Pennsylvania State University. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Kenneth Weiss - Department of Anthropology".

The Mermaid's Tale book. Assembling a set of general principles, authors Kenneth Weiss and Anne Buchanan build a comprehensive, unified theory that applies on the evolutionary time scale but also on the developmental and ecological scales where daily life is lived, and cells, organisms, and species interact. They present this story through a diversity of examples spanning the fundamental challenges that organisms have faced throughout the history of life.

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Four Billion Years of Cooperation in the Making of Living Things. Book Overview Assembling a set of general principles, authors Kenneth Weiss and Anne.

The Mermaid's Tale : Four Billion Years of Cooperation in the Making of Living Things. by Kenneth M. Weiss and Anne V. Buchanan. Even after 150 years, Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection is irresistibly compelling.

By Kenneth M. xiv 1 305 pp. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. The motivation for The Mermaid’s Tale: Four Billion Years of Cooperation in the Making of Living Things is what the authors view as an overemphasis of the role of natural selection in evolution and the emergence of biological complexity and diversity. The book is written with a de-emphasis on detail, and although this has its merits (see below), ultimately, I found that many of the arguments amounted to ‘‘just so’’ stories, needing deeper development and justification.

The mermaid's tale: four billion years of cooperation in the making of living things. KM Weiss, AV Buchanan. Harvard University Press, 2009. Genetics and the Logic of Evolution

The mermaid's tale: four billion years of cooperation in the making of living things. Genetics and the Logic of Evolution. John Wiley & Sons, 2004. The effects of scale: variation in the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster. SM Fullerton, AV Buchanan, VA Sonpar, SL Taylor, JD Smith, CS Carlson,. Human genetics 115 (1), 36-56, 2004.

Keywords: cooperation, Anne Buchanan, Mermaid's Tale, Four Billion, Kenneth, Living Things, Billion Years.

By: Kenneth M Weiss and Anne V Buchanan. 268 pages, 6 halftones, 52 line illustrations, 1 table. Publisher: Harvard University Press. ISBN: 9780674031937 Hardback Feb 2009 Usually dispatched within 4 days.

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Even after 150 years, Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection is irresistibly compelling. But how can this idea―in which competition prevails―be consistent with all that we know about the thoroughly cooperative nature of life at the genetic and cellular level? This book reconciles these discrepancies.

Assembling a set of general principles, authors Kenneth Weiss and Anne Buchanan build a comprehensive, unified theory that applies on the evolutionary time scale but also on the developmental and ecological scales where daily life is lived, and cells, organisms, and species interact. They present this story through a diversity of examples spanning the fundamental challenges that organisms have faced throughout the history of life. This shows that even very complex traits can be constructed simply, based on these principles. Although relentless competitive natural selection is widely assumed to be the primary mover of evolutionary change, The Mermaid’s Tale shows how life more generally works on the basis of cooperation. The book reveals that the focus on competition and cooperation is largely an artifact of the compression of time―a distortion that dissolves when the nature and origins of adapted life are viewed primarily from developmental and evolutionary time scales.

  • Hadadel
There was a time when evolution meant competition, and critics of Darwin from the Left berated the theory's natural implication that competitive capitalism was a natural order. A lot has happened since then. I think the watershed was John Maynard Smith and Eors Szathmary's The Major Transitions in Evolution (1997) and Laurent Keller's Levels of Selection in Evolution (1999), although I must say that when I first began studying population biology in about 1993, it was for the purpose of understanding cooperation in humans and other social species, not competition. Perhaps utimately, it was E. O. Wilson's Sociobiology (1975) that began the shift in evolutionary theory towards a balanced study of cooperation and competition.

Weiss and Buchanan have written an elementary introduction to evolutionary and developmental biology that is not suited for the classroom, but rather for casual reading by the intelligent layperson. Their claim to fame is that it stresses cooperation rather than competition, and development as well as evolution. The book is beauitifully produced and nicely written. The figures are instructive, and it gets away without any serious genetics or population dynamics.
  • Naril
I looked forward to reading this book, because I have long argued that cooperation is as important, if not more important, than competition in understanding evolution. The subtitle of this book suggested that it would be in a similar tradition, however what I found upon reading it was a series of arguments that I think adds more confusion than clarity to this issue. This book is fairly technical, yet it is not enlightening in the way it discusses technical issues. Perhaps more important, this book rarely even discusses interactions between actual organisms. Instead it focuses primarily on genes and cells and, as an evolutionary biologist, I found myself confused by the way they approach their arguments. The authors place a great deal of emphasis over cooperation at what they call the Devo level, which as far as I can determine argues that cells within individual organisms cooperate with one another during the process of development. This is a trivial argument. Of course, cells within an organism cooperate, if they did not there would be no organism. Since these cells all carry the same exact genetic material, basically their argument is an extreme version of kin selection, although the authors never make this point. Oddly, the authors never mention endosymbiosis, which is probably the single most important example of how cooperation impacts evolution, because it lays out how different forms of life combined to allow cells to become complex and also allows multicellular organisms to even exist. They also largely ignore the ideas of emergence and niche construction, which are also involved in how cooperation affects evolution. I think they only chose their title because they thought it would attract attention, and not because their strained example of mermaids helps their argument. If someone is interested on a book that addresses these issues, I suggest Kirschner and Gerhart's The Plausibility of Life.
  • Melipra
Weiss and Buchanan describe a new perspective for studying evolutionary biology. They challenge the emphasis on natural selection as the primary evolutionary force, remind us of caveats and limitations that even Darwin recognized, and show us a refreshing way to see the forest for the trees.

This book explains the "eco/devo/evo perspective," a perspective that not only is certain to be discussed by scholars for quite some time but also is certain to make you think about your own research in a whole new light.

The information is easily accessible but doesn't skimp on content, making it a must-read for non-academics, graduate students, and professionals alike.
  • Fek
An amazingly fun and informative romp through the history of evolution. I check the ecodevo blog everyday and am a better person for it!

Would more anthropologists and policy makers read this...