almediah.fr
» » Natural Hazards and Environmental Change (Key Issues in Environmental Change)

Download Natural Hazards and Environmental Change (Key Issues in Environmental Change) eBook

by Ian Mason,Christopher Kilburn,Bill McGuire

Download Natural Hazards and Environmental Change (Key Issues in Environmental Change) eBook
ISBN:
0340742208
Author:
Ian Mason,Christopher Kilburn,Bill McGuire
Category:
Science & Mathematics
Language:
English
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (January 4, 2002)
Pages:
200 pages
EPUB book:
1686 kb
FB2 book:
1552 kb
DJVU:
1358 kb
Other formats
txt rtf lrf azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
884


Natural Hazards and Environmental Change is a scientifically sound and well-written book giving a comprehensive overview of modern hazard investigations. Especially interesting is the main theme, .

Natural Hazards and Environmental Change is a scientifically sound and well-written book giving a comprehensive overview of modern hazard investigations. the thesis that anthropogenic factors are the main reason for these alarming events. This might have a positive effect in stimulating desirable social and political reactions. I am glad to have this useful book in my own library.

The natural hazards in this book are described in the light of IPCC's forecasts Windstorms are described to anthropogenic climate change and are shown to have the potential for large.

The natural hazards in this book are described in the light of IPCC's forecasts. The book is very readable (thanks to the clear writing, a transparent outline and a summary at the start of each chapter). Windstorms are described to anthropogenic climate change and are shown to have the potential for large changes for relatively small changes in the general climate. Its natural patterns of climate variability are presented, amongst which ENSO, NAO, and PNA (Pacific North American teleconnection)

Key Issues in Environmental Change. Chapter summary What are natural hazards? Natural hazards and environmental change Natural hazard impacts: a historical perspective A natural hazards primer Recent environmental change.

Key Issues in Environmental Change. Its natural patterns of climate variability are presented, amongst which ENSO, NAO, and PNA (Pacific North American teleconnection)

by Ian Mason, Christopher Kilburn, Bill McGuire.

by Ian Mason, Christopher Kilburn, Bill McGuire.

By: WJ McGuire, CR Kilburn and IM Mason. 187 pages, B/wphotos, figs, tabs. Publisher: Hodder Arnold. Series: Key Issues in Environmental Change. By: WJ McGuire, CR Kilburn and IM Mason. Other titles in Key Issues in Environmental Change. Environmental Archaeology. Browse other titles in Key Issues in Environmental Change.

Civil Engineer Environmental Management Environmental Change Natural Hazard.

May 2003, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 99–100 Cite as. Bill McGuire, Ian Mason and Christopher Kilburn: Natural Hazards and Environmental Change. Authors and affiliations. Civil Engineer Environmental Management Environmental Change Natural Hazard. These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Volume 140, Issue 2. March 2003, pp. 238-239. Mcguire, . mason, I. & kilburn, C. 2002. Natural Hazards and Environmental Change. Key Issues in Environmental Change Series. xii + 187 pp. Abingdon: Edward Arnold (Hodder Headline Group); copublished in the USA with Oxford University Press. Price £5. 0 (hard covers), £1. 9 (paperback). ISBN 0 340 74219 4; 0 340 74220 8 (pb).

Hazards and Environmental Change (Key Issues in Environmental .

Natural Hazards and Environmental Change (Key Issues in Environmental Change). William J. "Bill" McGuire (born 1954) is Emeritus Professor of Geophysical & Climate Hazards at University College London and is one of Britain's leading volcanologists.

by Springer Science and Business Media LLC. in Natural Hazards. Natural Hazards, Volume 29, pp 99-100; doi:10. 1023/a:1022903012206. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

We are at a critical period in our planet's history: global warming is real and it is happening now. With a few exceptions most scientists now believe that the global warming of recent decades is a function of human activities and the rising level of greenhouse gases accumulating in the atmosphere as a result. But such dynamic periods of environmental change have a destabilising impact, encouraging the onslaught of hazardous phenomena.'Natural Hazards and Environmental Change' highlights and critically evaluates the accumulating evidence for an intimate link between natural hazards and environmental change. Surveying a unique collection of themes, this link is examined from two viewpoints: first, how environmental change can contribute to an increased level of hazardous natural phenomenon, and second how natural hazards may themselves lead to environmental change on a local, regional or even global scale. Through exploring the often complex and dynamic relationships between environmental change and the frequency and severity of hazards (such as floods, windstorms, landslides, asteroid and comet impacts and volcanic eruptions), the book also introduces the reader to some of the more speculative aspects of the relationship: how, for example, variations in sea level are linked to the level of volcanic activity and how a warmer, wetter climate might lead to landslides and tsunami formation at oceanic islands. With dramatically rising temperatures and sea levels now inevitable, as well as a growing global population that is becoming increasingly vulnerable to hazardous geophysical phenomena, the world of the 21st century is likely to be an increasingly dangerous one.Assessing past effects, evaluating recent trends and addressing extrapolations of current geophysical models, 'Natural Hazards and Environmental Change' incorporates cutting-edge research to provide an invaluable guide to the impact of natural hazards now, and in the future.
  • Moogugore
The authors are from the Benfield Grieg Hazard Research Centre and the Dept. of Space and Climate Physics (all University College London). The book has been published in 2002, and is therefore heavily based on the results of the 3rd assessment report of 2001 by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), who upgraded their temperature rise forecasts to 8 degrees Celcius by the end of the century. The natural hazards in this book are described in the light of IPCC's forecasts.

The book is very readable (thanks to the clear writing, a transparent outline and a summary at the start of each chapter).

Windstorms are described to anthropogenic climate change and are shown to have the potential for large changes for relatively small changes in the general climate. Its natural patterns of climate variability are presented, amongst which ENSO, NAO, and PNA (Pacific North American teleconnection). The latest studies are presented which try to observe and predict the frequency and severity of extreme windstorms on a spatial and temporal scale.

River and coastal floods under global warming are examined. Most research on river floods has concentrated on changes in observed precipitation and prediction methods, but the authors also present non-climatic factors involving human influences on the river basin. Coastal flooding from tropical and extratropical storms under sea level change is investigated, as well as sea temperature changes (heat - and cold waves).

The 1999 Venezuela landslides, causing 50 000 fatalities, have put this undervalued natural hazard on the agenda again. The authors concentrate on the water accumulation below the surface of unstable slopes. The landslide's rheological properties (which resist the movement) are studied under environmental change.

Sea level change is discussed under the uncertainties of response to warming of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and the effect of CO2 gas mitigation in the coming decades. The effect of sea level rise on submarine landslides and as a consequence ocean-wide tsunami is analysed. Coastal erosion and other geomorphological effects of sea level rise are left out here.

A very interesting chapter on asteroid and comet impacts as initiator of environmental change is included in the book. Time domain simulations of a 20km/s impact in a 4 km deep ocean are presented (and comparable to the Deep Impact scenario ([...]

The book ends with some results from a recent paper in Science (v 289, p 2068-74, DR Easterling et al) on different forecasts of climate extremes. The authors plead for political will from industrialised countries such as USA, Japan and Australia to invert their increase in gas emissions before the hazardous aspects of climatic shift make themselves felt.
  • Saithi
Global warming proponents have had a good time publishing hysterical predictions of imminent disaster, and McGuire leads the pack. This book was published in 2002, and in the ten years since then, the major disasters have been entirely natural and totally unrelated to alleged climate change. Recent tsunamis occurred along known crustal faults, and have been the most serious disasters in terms of loss of life. To start with, these academics accept the flawed conclusions of the 2001 IPCC report, a report now known to be biased and flawed, as the Climategate messages showed (with the biased hockey stick graph, for example). The frequency or intensity of hurricanes has not increased at all (one of the results the authors predicted with confidence), and if anything, world temperatures have fallen rather than risen. The authors whip up hysterical nonsense when discussing other "imminent" catastrophes as well, such as meteorite strikes, and giant landslips, none of which have come to pass. So much for their predictions. Their book has the superficial look of a serious academic treatise, but the contents are very seriously flawed. For example, when discussing the historic record, they totally ignore the fact that past disasters or storms were frequently under-reported, and only the very worst reached the record books. Such a naive and gullible approach to such a serious subject undermines the credibility of this work, and it is best avoided for the hysterical clap-trap it surely remains.