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Download Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation eBook

by Frieda Zames,Doris Zames Fleischer

Download Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation eBook
ISBN:
1566398126
Author:
Frieda Zames,Doris Zames Fleischer
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Temple University Press (December 15, 2000)
Pages:
278 pages
EPUB book:
1969 kb
FB2 book:
1229 kb
DJVU:
1378 kb
Other formats
lit doc mbr docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
806


by Doris Fleischer (Author), Frieda Zames (Author). I would like to see a book that goes into as much detail about disability rights as a book would go into the civil right's movement.

by Doris Fleischer (Author), Frieda Zames (Author).

Although I was 'present at the creation' of much of this, I still learned a great deal. A unique feature of this book is the first-hand recounting of the remarkable work of the Disabled in Action (DIA) of New York.

Frieda Zames (October 29, 1932 - June 16, 2005) was an American disability rights activist and mathematics professor. With her sister, Doris Zames Fleischer, Zames wrote The Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation, a historical survey that has been used as a disability rights textbook. Zames was born in on October 29, 1932 in Brooklyn and died on June 16, 2005 in Manhattan. Disabled by a childhood bout of polio, Zames was institutionalized for many years

The book includes a new chapter on the evolving impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the continuing struggle for cross-disability civil and human rights, and the changing. The authors provide a probing analysis of such topics as on, housing, health care, assisted suicide, employment, education, new technologies, disabled veterans, and disability culture.

Doris Zames Fleischer and Frieda Zames expand their encyclopaedic history of the struggle for disability rights in the United States, to include the past ten years of disability rights activism. The book includes a new chapter on the evolving impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the continuing struggle for cross-disability civil and human rights, and the changing perceptions of disability

Like other civil rights struggles, the disability rights movement took place in the streets and in the courts as activists fought for change in the schools, the workplace, and in the legal system.

Like other civil rights struggles, the disability rights movement took place in the streets and in the courts as activists fought for change in the schools, the workplace, and in the legal system. The history of disability rights mirrors the history of the country. Based on interviews with almost a hundred activists, this book provides a detailed history of the struggle for disability rights in the United States.

Disability Rights Movement book. The book includes a new chapter on the evolving impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the continuing struggle for cross-disability civil and human r In this updated.

Based on interviews with almost a hundred activists, this book provides a detailed history of the struggle for disability . Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation.

Based on interviews with almost a hundred activists, this book provides a detailed history of the struggle for disability rights in the United States. ~~DOWNLOAD~~~ Nitroflare. me 1566398126,1566398118.

How do The Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation (by Doris Zames Fleischer and Frieda Zames) and The Nazi Doctors (by Robert Jay Lifton) make the following statement starkly clear.

Refer to specifics in both works to support your arguments.

Based on interviews with almost a hundred activists, this book provides a detailed history of the struggle for disability rights in the United States. It is a complex story of shifts in consciousness and shifts in policy, of changing focuses on particular disabilities such as blindness, deafness, polio, quadriplegia, psychiatric and developmental disabilities, chronic conditions (for example, cancer and heart disease), AIDS, and of activism and policymaking across disabilities. Referring to the Americans with Disabilities Act as 'every American's insurance policy', the authors recount the genesis of this civil rights approach to disability, from the almost forgotten disability activism of the 1930s, to the independent living movement of the 1970s, to the call for disability pride of the 1990s.Like other civil rights struggles, the disability rights movement took place in the streets and in the courts as activists fought for change in the schools, the workplace, and in the legal system. They continue to fight for effective access to the necessities of everyday life to telephones, buses, planes, public buildings, restaurants, and toilets. The history of disability rights mirrors the history of the country. Each World War sparked changes in disability policy and changes in medical technology as veterans without limbs and with other disabilities returned home. The empowerment of people with disabilities has become another chapter in the struggles over identity politics that began in the 1960s. Today, with the expanding ability of people with disabilities to enter the workforce and a growing elderly population, issues like longterm care are becoming increasingly significant at a time when HMOs are trying to contain health care expenditures.Author note: Doris Zames Fleischer has been a member of the Humanities and Social Sciences Department at New Jersey Institute of Technology since 1988. Frieda Zames, Associate Professor of Mathematics Emeritus at New Jersey Institute of Technology, has been a disability rights activist for over twenty-five years. Both sisters live in New York City.
  • Acrobat
I liked how the book considered events from even today as part of the disability rights movement; some people I know are even part of it. However, the book does not go in chronological order, nor does it go in much detail about key events. I think the writers need to remember that the moments they discuss in this book are not commonly discussed in school. I would like to see a book that goes into as much detail about disability rights as a book would go into the civil right's movement.
  • Nicanagy
Really good read about the Disability Rights Movement.
  • Hawk Flying
Very good and informative
  • Diab
As a mom with a child with special needs...I appreciate this book.
  • Arashitilar
Great book on this important history. So glad it was updated and others can learn how disabled folks have fought valiantly and smartly for their rights.
  • The Sphinx of Driz
I wish I could give this book more than 5 stars bc I learned so much and I loved it
  • Manesenci
This is my personal opinion, it may be considered bias in some ways. The book is good reading because personally there is general information and other things I did not know or heard about before. Therefore, I appreciate what I've learned so far. Yet, the author speaks of a lot of people and organizations and does not explain what they are, making me feel like I should had known what it is or I find myself stopping and looking things up online. The author also writes as if she is conversating with someone and again does not share who she is talking about, she just mentions names and expects us to know who she is talking about; she does this throughout the book. Some people that keep up with the news and the government activities and reads stuff all the time may know who the people are but not a lot of us like me. So you have to spend more time finding out who is who and read about them so you can compare what she is saying in the book. Yet, some of the people she uses she just using them but does not elaborate much but just to mentioned them, and I do not get that. Also, the author sounds like she is giving good information yet at the same time she is opinionated and bias at the same time throughout the book. I am using this book for a disability and policy class this semester. I dont have anything against the author, just that for school I want to rely more on facts and proofs, and the feelings and thoughts is fine but not 100% concerning class.
Reads like an encyclopedia.