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Download The One and Only Sam: A Story Explaining Idioms for Children with Asperger Syndrome and Other Communication Difficulties eBook

by Bob Spencer,Aileen Stalker

Download The One and Only Sam: A Story Explaining Idioms for Children with Asperger Syndrome and Other Communication Difficulties eBook
ISBN:
1849050406
Author:
Bob Spencer,Aileen Stalker
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley Publishers (November 15, 2009)
Pages:
64 pages
EPUB book:
1759 kb
FB2 book:
1864 kb
DJVU:
1779 kb
Other formats
txt lrf doc docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
761


The One and Only Sam provides a fresh and fun approach to exploring common idioms for all children aged 5 to 8, as well as those with Asperger Syndrome and communication difficulties. This one was no exception.

More specifically, this book was designed for children with Asperger syndrome

More specifically, this book was designed for children with Asperger syndrome. The book starts with a very useful ‘how to use this book’ section and sticks to the ‘how to’ strategy.

Author: Aileen Stalker. Publishing Info: Hardcover 64 pages, 2009

Author: Aileen Stalker. Publishing Info: Hardcover 64 pages, 2009. The One and Only Sam is the story of a boy who, like many children, struggles to understand non-literal expressions. This can be a particular problem for children with Asperger Syndrome, who tend to be literal thinkers. Throughout the story, Sam encounters a range of common idioms – such as curiosity killed the cat, on top of the world, and full of beans – each of which is accompanied by an illustration of its literal meaning and one depicting its actual meaning, helping children to explore what the idioms sound like and why they might mean what they do.

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She has over 30 years' experience of assessing and treating children with a wide variety of diagnoses and has presented papers at numerous conferences, developed handbooks and manuals for clinical therapeutic use and worked at a senior level in several Occupational Therapy departments. She has also trained as a tutor for children with dyslexia and recently retired from her private tutoring and occupational therapy practice

This listing is for The One and Only Sam . ISBN 9781849050401: All previously owned books are guaranteed t. .

This listing is for The One and Only Sam : A Story Explaining Idioms for Children with Asperger Syndrome and Other Communication Difficulties by Ailee ISBN 9781849050401: All previously owned books are guaranteed to be in good condition.

She has over 30 years' experience of assessing and treating children with a wide variety of diagnoses and has presented papers at numerous conferences, developed handbooks and manuals for clinical therapeutic use and worked at a senior level in several Occupational Therapy departments. She has also trained as a tutor for children with dyslexia and recently retired from her private tutoring and occupational therapy practice

The One and Only Sam: A Story Explaining Idioms for Children with Asperger Syndrome and Other Communication Difficulties. Social Care and Neurodisability.

The One and Only Sam: A Story Explaining Idioms for Children with Asperger Syndrome and Other Communication Difficulties. Publication date: 11 May 2012.

One rainy morning after breakfast, Sam's Mother said to his Father, "My goodness, George, it is raining cats and dogs outside." "That's strange," thought Sam. When he looked up into the sky outside, he couldn't see any cats and dogs anywhere, no matter where he looked. All he could see were giant raindrops and big puddles...

The One and Only Sam is the story of a boy who, like many children, struggles to understand non-literal expressions. This can be a particular problem for children with Asperger Syndrome, who tend to be literal thinkers. Throughout the story, Sam encounters a range of common idioms - such as "curiosity killed the cat," "on top of the world," and "full of beans" - each of which is accompanied by an illustration of its literal meaning and one depicting its actual meaning, helping children to explore what the idioms sound like and why they might mean what they do. The book also suggests simple steps that children can take whenever they encounter new and unfamiliar idioms that are not covered in the book. A glossary, and a list of additional books and websites, provides further resources to help children learn about idioms and their origins.

The One and Only Sam provides a fresh and fun approach to exploring common idioms for all children aged 5 to 8, as well as those with Asperger Syndrome and communication difficulties.

  • Muniath
Overall, this picture book is easy to deal with not only for Aspergians but also those who want to learn English as a second language. Especially, the story-telling approach catches my eye. Some people seem to criticize the story and the pictures are plain dull, but the purpose of this book is great and well-organized, if you ask me.

I gave it 4 stars for 3 reasons:
1. I'm impressed by the comparison between the picture of the literal meaning and the one of the actual meaning, which is quite similar to What Did You Say? What Do You Mean? written by Jude Welton. Easy to approach and specific!
2. Unfortunately the book includes some outdated idioms, so you may get burned if you take all of the idioms for granted. I got quite embarrassed when I used 'rain cats and dogs' and found out one of my friends got stunned. He said awkwardly,"We don't say that these days; it's already out."
3. Age limitation doesn't make sense. Even adults with Asperger's find it difficult to catch metaphors and idioms. Besides, I believe it might be best to deal with this easy-read stuff for beginners whose mother tongues aren't English.

I would also recommend you to deal with Scholastic Dictionary of Idioms written by Marvin Terban and What Did You Say? What Do You Mean? written by Jude Welton. Especially, the former is very detailed and informative.
  • Virn
This is an excellent navigational tool and translator for people on the autism/Asperger's (a/A) spectrum. Many people on the spectrum have difficulty with idioms and often take things others say literaly. This book does an outstanding job of explaining idioms and even provides their origins!

Neurotypicals (NT) and a/A readers alike will get a lot out of this book. I like the way a list of other idioms is provided at the end along with explanations of each. In fact, I found it a very helpful tool as well!

Sam, the titular character is about age 5. He has started school and is eager to show off the idioms he has learned, such as "it's raining cats and dogs," which prior to a discussion baffled him. The pictures of Sam's literal perception of idiomatic expressions are very funny and clever.

Sam's class appears to be a special needs class. He has 8 other classmates and one has an extremely adverse reaction to loud noises and startles easily (Isaac is scared of his own shadow); another who almost never speaks until he has a chance to "come out of his shell." Each child described in the book appears to have a place on the a/A spectrum. However, the children in this book appear to have Asperger's as all are extremely high functioning.

Jessica Kingsley Publishers (JKP) deserves a special shout-out for providing the world at large with a plethora of excellent books about people with autism. JPK publishes ONLY books of extraordinary caliber and has been an invaluable source in providing information and educating the world at large about autism.

This is a book for everybody. It speaks to tolerance and everybody can learn from it. If you get just one book about the subtleties and intricacies of language, make sure this is the book you get.
  • blodrayne
Aileen Stalker's book is a pleasant surprise to me. The book is simple with profound implications, it is a children's book that adults can enjoy while sharing it with youngsters.

Although "The One and Only Sam" is written for children with Asperger syndrome, it could be a useful book to teach most young children about idioms in our language. Asperger children tend to take things literally. The author teaches the child how to decode the idioms of American speech to make them less confusing.

Stalker teaches a four step method:
1. Listen to the words
2. Make a picture in your mind.
3. Think if this picture makes sense
4. Look for the things that are the same between your picture and what is happening.

Some of the "fun" idioms presented are: It is raining cats and dogs; She tore her hair out; He was afraid of his own shadow; and curiosity killed the cat.

While I am not an expert on conditions like Asperger, this four step approach appears helpful. When I grew up, I was left to detect the meaning of idioms using the context of the overall message. The Asperger child would have difficulty doing this.

I believe this book could be useful for teaching any young child our language.
I recommend this book for those with small children. I intend to use this book with my grandson when he is about 5 or 6 years old.
  • Priotian
I enjoyed this book .... At least the first third of it. Then, I found myself getting bored and wondered why. I am a psychotherapist and have met and gotten to know quite a large number of children with this disorder and their parents over many years of practice. The first thing one learns about them is that they are each different. The communalities of social ineptness (not being able to read and respond appropriately to social 'cues') and , as this book focuses on, their propensity toward being particularly concrete does not make them a homogeneous group of children. I could think of some kids I have met who would relate to this book... a piece at a time. Taken as a whole, I believe that kids would find it redundant (as I realized that I did) and it would not be likely to hold their interest.
It does make very good points and the examples are valid. My guess is that it would best be used in brief snatches - maybe one or possibly two pages at a time when the book's 'stories' can be connected with actual experiences the child has recently had or with questions they are asking about in the here and now. This uses a book about concreteness concretely!
This is, perhaps, less a criticism of the book than it is a suggested guide for its use by both parents and professionals.
Because it looks like a 'sit down and let's read this together' book, I was surprised at my reaction to it. No doubt it can be useful needing always to take the variable that is the individual child into account.