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Download Two Treatises of Government eBook

by James Langton,John Locke

Download Two Treatises of Government eBook
ISBN:
1452631425
Author:
James Langton,John Locke
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tantor Audio; Library - Unabridged CD edition (March 28, 2011)
EPUB book:
1418 kb
FB2 book:
1469 kb
DJVU:
1115 kb
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Rating:
4.8
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955


Often considered the foundation of political liberalism, John Locke's Two Treatises of Government was first published anonymously in 1689.

Often considered the foundation of political liberalism, John Locke's Two Treatises of Government was first published anonymously in 1689. by. John Locke (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

Two Treatises of Government is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689 by John Locke

Two Treatises of Government is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689 by John Locke. The First Treatise attacks patriarchalism in the form of refutation of Robert Filmer's Patriarcha, while the Second Treatise outlines Locke's ideas for a more civilized society based on natural rights and contract theory. This publication contrasts former political works by Locke himself.

Two Treatises of Government. When Shaftesbury failed to reconcile the interests of the king and Parliament, he was dismissed; in 1681 he was arrested, tried, and finally acquitted of treason by a London jury. A year later he fled to Holland, where in 1683 he died. In this respect the Two Treatises was a response to the political situation as it existed in England at the time of the exclusion controversy, though its message was of much more lasting significance. John Locke (Author), James Langton (Narrator), Tantor Audio (Publisher). This product also discusses the FIRST treatise of government - on ecclesiastical government, which is rarely read or discussed. Get this audiobook plus a second, free. George H. Smith did a great job in writing the script of this work on Locke and his two treatises. This product is recorded professionally by professional voice actors, with a full cast of actors. This makes it more interesting to listen to.

Of the Dissolution of Government. In the Former, The False Principles and Foundation of Sir Robert Filmer, and His Followers, Are Detected and. Overthrown: The Latter, Is an Essay Concerning the Original, Extent, and End, of Civil Government. from The Works of John Locke. If he think it not worth while to examine his works all through, let him make an experiment in that part where he treats of usurpation; and let him try whether he can, with all his skill, make sir Robert intelligible and consistent with himself, or common sense.

Читает James Langton . Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Often considered the foundation of political liberalism, John Locke's Two Treatises of Government was first published anonymously in 1689, in the wake of England's Glorious Revolution. In The First Treatise of Government, Locke refutes the idea of divine monarchy, while The Second Treatise of Government articulates Locke's philosophy of government, which he based upon his theories of natural rights and the social contract. 0 5 Author: John Locke Narrator: James Langton . Download books offline, listen to several books continuously, choose stories for your kids, or try out a book that you didn't thought you would like to listen to.

Through Shaftesbury's patronage, Locke earned some government posts and entered London's intellectual circles, all the while writing philosophy. He was one of the best-known European thinkers of his time when he died in 1704. In An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), Locke established the philosophy of empiricism, which holds that the mind at birth is a blank tablet.

Written by John Locke, Audiobook narrated by James Langton. John Locke and his works - particularly An Essay Concerning Human Understanding - are regularly and rightly presented as foundations for the Age of Enlightenment.

Often considered the foundation of political liberalism, John Locke's Two Treatises of Government was first published anonymously in 1689, in the wake of England's Glorious Revolution. In The First Treatise of Government, Locke refutes the idea of divine monarchy, while The Second Treatise of Government articulates Locke's philosophy of government, which he based upon his theories of natural rights and the social contract. In Locke's view, governments' legitimacy is based upon their performance of their proper functions-preservation of the life, liberty, and property rights of their citizens, and protection from those who seek to violate these rights. A radical doctrine at the time of its publication, Locke's theories provided a philosophical basis for many of the principles behind the American Revolution. More than 300 years after the publication of the Two Treatises of Government, Locke's ideas continue to spark debate. A must-listen for anyone interested in the foundations of contemporary political ideology, Locke's hugely influential work will retain its relevance for generations to come.
  • Danial
Great product. (This is a review of the recording by Knowledge Products, in its Giants of Political Thought series, part of its Audio Classics series, of John Locke's Two Treatises of Government.) This product explains in a very interesting manner the political context of 17th century Britain, in which Locke's two treatises were written. They were not written purely as a theoretical tract. They were actually written during revolutionary plots in which Locke was participating. He was no armchair political theorist. He was knee deep in revolutionary intrigue. This product also discusses the FIRST treatise of government -- on ecclesiastical government, which is rarely read or discussed. It's fascinating. George H. Smith did a great job in writing the script of this work on Locke and his two treatises. This product is recorded professionally by professional voice actors, with a full cast of actors. This makes it more interesting to listen to. I have listened to it probably a dozen times. Each time, I find something interesting.
  • Alsardin
While it's tough to slog through the LONG sentences and convoluted writing of a 17th century lawyer, THIS is one of the key sources that the Framers of America's Constitution used for the basis of their thinking.
Without John Locke - along with others of the European Enlightenment - the "American Experiment" would likely have never happened.
Worth the time and the money for anyone who wants to better understand what America was REALLY meant to be.
  • Thoginn
Good book to learn about how current western systems of government evolved into how it is today from overreaching power of monarchical forms of government over the populace that existed in Western Europe during Locke's time. Locke's concepts of limited government, basic human liberties, private property, consent of the governed and the right to revolutionize against overreaching monarchs formed the basis of revolutions in the 18th & 19th centuries to form our Western civilization's methods and forms of democracy today albeit towards an oligarchical direction. Though I do have to demure to the fact that Locke viewed a slave as having liberty as long as the slaveowner did'nt murder or ill treat the slave beyond the boundaries of the slavery contract. I chalk up this tripe viewpoint up to more a reflection on the inured society to slavery during Locke's age than a reflection on Locke himself. Essential to these antecedent revolutions after Locke was Locke's concept in the second treatise of the consent of the governed to be ruled. It formed and fomented these revolutions to form our present day western democracies. It was nice to read about the thoughts of the grandfather of today's democracies. Only issue I had was it takes a little time and effort to get used to Locke's renaissance English but I think CB Macpherson did an overall good job in editing this book.
  • Tekasa
I'm happy to have read John Locke's Second Treatise of Government. In this work, Locke argues that the purpose of government is to preserve people's life, freedom, and property, or as he writes life, "liberty," and property. The American founders were very much influenced by Locke's work here, which is why Americans' right to "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" is guaranteed in our Declaration of Independence.

In the treatise, Locke tells the story that we were once in a state of nature, where we were all free and equal. Life was good for us all except when people wanted retribution for harms done, so this state of nature deteriorated into a state of war. Then we agreed to form governments to have an outside arbitrator who could provide us protections for our lives, freedoms, and property. It's unclear if Locke really believes this account but in some passages seems to half-heartedly endorse it. At any rate, Locke thinks that a sufficient reason for joining up with a government as opposed to living in an anarchist society (a society devoid of a formal State) is that the government or State could guarantee its citizens with protections that the anarchist society could not.

Locke has some interesting arguments in here about how we as human beings own our own bodies and are entitled to property because we mix our labor with natural resources and so we are also entitled to the fruits of our labor, since this labor is an extension of our bodies. But Locke puts a proviso in there, which, if took seriously, would have radical explanations. Locke thinks that we should only accept enough property so that there would be enough left for others. After he makes mention of this proviso, he doesn't really seem to take it seriously throughout the rest of the work, nor did those who adapted the work to their own purposes, like the American framers for example. But if they did, it would have major implications for what the organization of a more decent society would look like.