almediah.fr
» » Can Gun Control Work? (Studies in Crime and Public Policy)

Download Can Gun Control Work? (Studies in Crime and Public Policy) eBook

by James B. Jacobs

Download Can Gun Control Work? (Studies in Crime and Public Policy) eBook
ISBN:
0195145623
Author:
James B. Jacobs
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (September 12, 2002)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1595 kb
FB2 book:
1152 kb
DJVU:
1543 kb
Other formats
rtf txt mobi lit
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
234


James B. Jacobs has produced a primer on gun control laws in the United States, an up-close view of the politics of gun control and . He asks the right questions and the skepticism expressed in the book Can Gun Control Work?

James B. Jacobs has produced a primer on gun control laws in the United States, an up-close view of the politics of gun control and a comprehensive examination of the likelihood that legislative efforts to control illegal guns will be successful. Professor Jacobs, a highly respected scholat, has always been dedicated to finding interventions against violence.

Can gun control really work? The last decade has seen several watersheds in the debate, none more important than the 1993 Brady Bill. Can Gun Control Work? Studies in Crime and Public Policy.

Hate Crimes: Criminal Law and Identity Politics (Studies in Crime and Public Policy).

book by James B. Jacobs. Few schisms in American life run as deep or as wide as the divide between gun rights and gun control advocates. Hate Crimes: Criminal Law and Identity Politics (Studies in Crime and Public Policy). James B. Jacobs, Kimberly Potter.

Can Gun Control Work? book. Can Gun Control Work? (Studies in Crime and Public Policy). 0195176588 (ISBN13: 9780195176582). Jacobs moves beyond easy slogans and broad-brush ideology to examine the on-the-ground practicalities of gun control, from mandatory safety locks to outright prohibition and disarmament. Casting aside ideology and abstractions, he cautions against the belief that there exists some gun control solution which, had we the political will to seize it, would substantially reduce violent crime.

Jacobs has also written books on political corruption, hate crime, gun control, and criminal records. Can Gun Control Work? (Oxford University Press, 2002). He has also written well over one hundred articles on diverse criminal law and criminology topics, most recently on the jurisprudential and policy issues related to gun control. Jacobs’ books include:, The Toughest Gun Control Law in the Nation: The Unfulfilled Promise of New York's SAFE Act (New York University Press, 2019) (with Zoe Fuhr).

To a large extent, gun control is something that people believe in.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Studies in Crime and Public Policy: Hate .

This book could make a vital resource for elected officials who may want to take a critical look at attempts to reform hate crime laws. -National Catholic Register"James B. Jacobs and Kimberly.

Do gun control laws reduce crime? Do they save lives? . A 1991 study in The New England Journal of Medicine compared Washington to its suburbs before and after the gun law took effect.

A 1991 study in The New England Journal of Medicine compared Washington to its suburbs before and after the gun law took effect. The study found no drops in other kinds of homicides and suicides in Washington, and no changes in the suburbs.

Got it. We value your privacy.

Can Gun Control Work?" by James B. Jacobs (2002). Out of Range: Why the Constitution Can't End the Battle over Guns" by Mark V. Tushnet (2007). The Founders' View of the Right to Bear Arms: A Definitive History of the Second Amendment" by David Young (2007). The Founders' Second Amendment: Origins of the Right to Bear Arms" by Stephen P. Halbrook (2008). The Bias Against Guns: Why Almost Everything You'Ve Heard About Gun Control Is Wrong by John R. Lott.

Few schisms in American life run as deep or as wide as the divide between gun rights and gun control advocates. Awash in sound and symbol, the gun regulation debate has largely been defined by forceful rhetoric rather than substantive action. Politicians shroud themselves in talk of individual rights or public safety while lobbyists on both sides make doom-and-gloom pronouncements on the consequences of potential shifts in the status quo. In America today there are between 250 and 300 million firearms in private hands, amounting to one weapon for every American. Two in five American homes house guns. On the one hand, most gun owners are law-abiding citizens who believe they have a constitutional right to bear arms. On the other, a great many people believe gun control to be our best chance at reducing violent crime. While few--whether gun owner or anti-gun advocate--dispute the need to keep guns out of the wrong hands, the most important question has too often been dodged: What gun control options does the most heavily armed democracy in the world have? Can gun control really work? The last decade has seen several watersheds in the debate, none more important than the 1993 Brady Bill. That bill, James B. Jacobs argues, was the culmination of a strategy in place since the 1930s to permit widespread private ownership of guns while curtailing illegal use. But where do we go from here? While the Brady background check is easily circumvented, any further attempts to extend gun control--for instance, through comprehensive licensing of all gun owners and registration of all guns--would pose monumental administrative burdens. Jacobs moves beyond easy slogans and broad-brush ideology to examine the on-the-ground practicalities of gun control, from mandatory safety locks to outright prohibition and disarmament. Casting aside ideology and abstractions, he cautions against the belief that there exists some gun control solution which, had we the political will to seize it, would substantially reduce violent crime. In Can Gun Control Work?, James B. Jacobs, one of our most fearless commentators on intractable social problems, has given us the most sober and even-handed assessment of whether gun control can really be made to work.
  • Kajikus
Over the last few years, I've read most of the books written on this subject, from Michael A. Bellesiles' "Arming America" to John Lott's "More Guns, Less Crime."
"Can Gun Control Work?" stands head and shoulders above the rest. First, Jacobs has carefully described the history of gun control in the United States (and for the most part, the book focuses on the US). Second, he takes a careful look at what the problem actually is -- is it accidents? suicides? homicides? Jacobs does a very rigorous (but not dry) job of explaining what the statistics actually show about gun violence -- poking some holes in commonly accepted myths from both sides of the debate.
Finally, I think he does a very good and pragmatic job of looking at what gun control measures may actually work. Our national discussion about gun control is dominated by emotional outbursts about gun rights on the one hand and about gun risks on the other -- this book steers clear of emotion to examine what is really happening, and what we can really do about it.
Jacobs reaches conclusions that will annoy gun rights advocates (gun shows are impossible to police and should probably be banned outright) and conclusions that will annoy anti-gun activists (a ban on handguns would be just as impossible to enforce as our drug laws). He calls 'em as he see 'em.
I would recommend this book to both pro and anti-gun readers without any reservation.
  • Brightfury
This book should be must reading for the anti-gun crowd, although they won't read it. It is too slanted toward the truth; it discusses the pros and cons of the gun control debate--to the detriment of both sides, but more slanted toward the free guns side (although he does advocate some gun controls). The major arguement against the book from the anti-gun folks is that he points out, in a clear and succint manner, why most gun controls won't work; mostly the arguement usually heard that criminals simply won't abide by any law, no matter how well-intentioned. There's also the issue of loopholes, which he holds up for all to see. However, he does argue for closing gun shows (or at least extending the Brady Bill to cover them)...and then points out how even this won't help as people intent on obtaining guns can easily get them from people who want to sell them. Usually private parties.

Unfortunately, most gun control advocates won't ever read this, as they don't want to be confronted with the facts, preferring to live in their own fantasy world where everything will be fine if we just pass enough laws. It's irrelavent that there aren't enough police or other law enforcement personnel to enforce such laws.

Pro-gun forces will find succinct arguements against almost anything the anti-gun crowd can throw against them. They already know the facts; it is just that the other side refuses to accept reality.

At least, that's the argument, as well presented in this book.
  • from earth
The author does hit on many of the common arguments both for and against gun control issues and attempts to clarify both sides positions but in doing so he fails to answer the title question of the book. In contrast to the closing statement in the book description; "Casting aside ideology and abstractions, he cautions against the belief that there exists some gun control solution which, had we the political will to seize it, would substantially reduce violent crime.", the author suggests that several gun-controls be enacted while acknowledging that there is little if any evidence that the controls would have any effect at all.

The book is a good indtoduction to the debate for someone with little or no understanding of the major points but the closing recommendations appear unfounded.