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Download The Ride Together: A Brother and Sister's Memoir of Autism in the Family eBook

by Paul Karasik

Download The Ride Together: A Brother and Sister's Memoir of Autism in the Family eBook
ISBN:
0743423372
Author:
Paul Karasik
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Washington Square Press (September 14, 2004)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1308 kb
FB2 book:
1598 kb
DJVU:
1669 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
988


Siblings Paul and Judy Karasik tell their life stories as relates to their brother David, who has an especially severe form of autism. Born in 1948, David appeared to meet developmental milestones within normal limits during the first year of his life, save for speech.

Siblings Paul and Judy Karasik tell their life stories as relates to their brother David, who has an especially severe form of autism. In beautifully, brilliantly drawn comic-style illustrations, his younger brother Paul depicts family scenes with David and then only sibling, younger brother Michael going to a doctor's office while David awaits his verdict. David receives a multitude of antiquated diagnoses given the times including aphasia.

The Ride Together book. Judy Karasik writes the This is a memoir by sister and brother team Judy and Paul Karasik. There are eighteen chapters in all, broken up into five chronological sections.

This is a strange book, 1/2 straight memoir by Judy Karasik and 1/2 graphic memoir by Paul Karasik about the family of a man on the more incapacitated side of the autism spectrum and the difficulty in finding a place for him where he can grow and contribute to his community

This is a strange book, 1/2 straight memoir by Judy Karasik and 1/2 graphic memoir by Paul Karasik about the family of a man on the more incapacitated side of the autism spectrum and the difficulty in finding a place for him where he can grow and contribute to his community. It's definitely not a feel good book; the ever present possibility of abuse in institutions that care for people who can't speak for themselves is examined. David, the autistic brother, who is in his 50's now spends a small part of the book in his pajamas, but for the most part he dresses in a suit and tie.

So begins a book unlike . This groundbreaking work was excerpted in The New York Times for its ability to honestly, eloquently, and respectfully set forth what life is like with autism in the family. What sets The Ride Together apart is its combination of imagination and realism - its vision of a family's inner world - with David at the center. Kieli: Englanti Kategoria: Hyvinvointi & elämäntaito Kääntäjä: Lisätietoa e-kirjasta

He is the coauthor, with Mark Newgarden, of "How To Read Nancy", 2018 winner of the Eisner Award for "Best Comics-Related Book". He is also an occasional cartoonist for The New Yorker.

Judy Karasik, Paul Karasik. Publications citing this paper.

The Ride Together: A Brother and Sister’s Memoir of Autism in the Family by Paul and Judy Karasik. In this unique dual-perspective memoir, Judy Karasik narrates while Paul Karasik uses comics to express what it was like to grow up with their older brother, David, who has autism. Their story follows David from childhood through middle age, divulging a family’s strange inner world that the Karasiks always considered perfectly normal. I Am Intelligent: From Heartbreak to Healing - A Mother and Daughter’s Journey Through Autism by Peyton and Dianne Goddard.

This is a truly outstanding book. Judy and Paul, the two youngest Karasik children chronicle the parallels of their neurotypical development alongside of that of David.

book by Judy Karasik. This is a truly outstanding book. Siblings Paul and Judy Karasik tell their life stories as relates to their brother David, who has an especially severe form of autism.

The book provides little practical information about autism. The ride-with its joy and its sadness-is ongoing, its end indistinct. Author: Paul Karasik and Judy Karasik. Publisher: Washington Square Press. Both authors’ interest is in remembering the daily life of their family, one of whose members challenges their emotions, patience, and understanding but who has always been loved and respected. Sometimes David, who knows the middle name of every member of the House and Senate who has served during his lifetime, will give the guests new jobs, Judy Karasik writes.

Karasik's book, The Ride Together: A Memoir of Autism in the Family (2004), co-written with his sister, Judy Karasik, employed the format of alternating prose and comics chapters to tell their story of growing up with an older brother with autism.

We looked like a cup of human fruit cocktail dumped onto the top of the house, each piece different but all out of the same can. So begins a book unlike any other, half comics and half text, about a family that lives with autism -- and the strange life that is ordinary to them. The oldest son, David, recites Superman episodes as he walks around the living room. A late-night family poker game spirals into a fog-driven duel. A thug from an old black-and-white rerun crawls out of the television. A housekeeper transforms into an avenging angel. A broken plate signals a terrible change in the family that none of them can prevent...until it's too late. This groundbreaking work was excerpted in The New York Times for its ability to honestly, eloquently, and respectfully set forth what life is like with autism in the family. What sets The Ride Together apart is its combination of imagination and realism -- its vision of a family's inner world -- with David at the center.
  • Froststalker
This book brings the amazing combined approaches from siblings growing up with a brother whose different-ness and involved special needs have carried him well into adulthood. The writers recall their early lives as family members and individuals in their own rights as they share the challenges of loving their perplexing, often-funny, never-boring brother.
  • Fenrikree
Although the format is indeed innovative; interspersing cartoon chapters with prose, neither type of chapter had enough substance to make it worth reading. The book had a very interesting premise (which made me buy it), but I was disappointed that it was so loosely tied together and undeveloped.
  • JoJoshura
I am still reading this book for my class. It is very interesting. I would recommend this book to someone learning about autism because it gives first hand experience of what it is like to live with someone with autism.
  • MrDog
It was a required read that in the end was amazing to read. A very good true story that doesn't sugar-coat the disability experience. Thumbs up for this family and the lessons they shared.
  • Chinon
This book is great, I felt it was telling the story of my brother. It was great to read, this. The format of the book is very easy to read, reading with comics.
  • Alsantrius
What a unique way to tell a true story. It was very easy to read, moving, and funny. No sugar coating. I highly recommend this book.
  • Bradeya
The condition of the book came in as I expected and my son was able to use it for his college course.
This is a truly outstanding book. Siblings Paul and Judy Karasik tell their life stories as relates to their brother David, who has an especially severe form of autism.

Born in 1948, David appeared to meet developmental milestones within normal limits during the first year of his life, save for speech. In beautifully, brilliantly drawn comic-style illustrations, his younger brother Paul depicts family scenes with David and then only sibling, younger brother Michael going to a doctor's office while David awaits his verdict. David receives a multitude of antiquated diagnoses given the times including aphasia.

Judy and Paul, the two youngest Karasik children chronicle the parallels of their neurotypical development alongside of that of David. Unable to stand changes to his routine, David insists on "putting on TV shows" wherein he "interviewed" politicians and copied the format of televised interviews. When crossed, he would self stim and even hit his own head, screaming out names of television characters. He also liked to list the names of the neighborhood barbers and seemed to derive comfort in anticipating his haircuts at their shop. The barbers had established a bond with the Karasik family and would step up to the plate for their father when he suffered his final illness in 1992.

Other challenges crop up in their family. The Karasik children's maternal grandfather and his daughter, their aunt move into their home in 1969. Their aunt, severely debilitated and profoundly retarded after suffering from a cerebral hemorrhage in infancy is installed in one room and their grandfather has the study. An angel of a nurse named Dorothy White cares for the pair as well as the Karasik children.

To ease Dorothy's work load, a night nurse is hired. When Judy comes home one night and finds the nurse watching television, ignoring her grandfather's anguished cries and dismissing them, the first person she calls is Dorothy. Like the Cavalry, Dorothy rushes over to the home to resume caring for the pair. The night nurse's departure is expedited and rightfully so after her callous inattention to the patients' needs.

Dorothy again steps up to the plate for her ailing charges. She insists on having them move into her home where she and other members of her family can care of them. This arrangement worked well until a fire destroyed her home in March, 1978 killing both patients, another relative who lived in the home and injuring Dorothy's husband. An electrical short from a television in an upstairs bedroom caused the fire and sadly, the patients perished from smoke inhalation. Luckily, the Karasiks were able to rally around Dorothy and her husband's side and continue a circle of love. Dorothy sounded like a genuine angel.

The professional and personal Long & Winding Roads of each Karasik are gently chronicled. Readers come away with an enriched sense of life with multiple challenges - severe autism; sibling questions; elderly relatives' needs and sadly, the death of a parent. The comic illustrations by Paul Karasik add much to the book and some are such beautifully moving accounts, such as the early one about David's diagnosis and later, the death of their father that they might make you cry. The final comic strip in this book is also quite moving indeed. Dorothy's kindness is also extremely heartwarming.

There are funny parts. Paul's middle school prank, as he drew many years later; Paul and David going to the Three Stoogeathon in their neighborhood theater and the HILARIOUS story Paul drew about that movie trip might make you laugh. I love that!

Judy describes watching the movie "Rain Man" on television. Although the movie is never mentioned by name, it is plain that it is the movie she references. In her words, it is a movie about somebody "with an autistic brother" who lives in a residence; can tell how many matches are in a box and who is taken out of his residential facility to travel the countryside with his neurotypical brother. Although I didn't care for "Rain Man," I found her comments about it in relation to her brother very interesting.

David was enrolled in residential facilities that were unsatisfactory and day programs with varying degrees of success. In 1995 when their mother, then widowed 3 years decides to sell the family home and move into a smaller place, the sad and frightening truth about David's then current placement emerges. Mother and siblings band together and find a good program that will meet David's needs.

This book really touched my heart. I hope other readers will enjoy it and find it as moving as I did.