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Download This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking (Edge Question Series) eBook

by John Brockman

Download This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking (Edge Question Series) eBook
ISBN:
0062109391
Author:
John Brockman
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harper Perennial; Original edition (February 14, 2012)
Pages:
448 pages
EPUB book:
1889 kb
FB2 book:
1873 kb
DJVU:
1697 kb
Other formats
mobi txt txt lit
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
970


The "Best of Edge" Book Series.

The literary agent and all-purpose intellectual impresario John Brockman gathers members of this network for summits. He arranges symposia and encourages online conversations. The "Best of Edge" Book Series.

Oct 28, 2012 Lisa Hura rated it it was amazing. org question of 2011 was "What scientific concept would improve everybody's cognitive toolkit?" Many of the world's most famous thinkers responded to it, and their responses are compiled in this book in one-to-four-page essays organized thematically.

This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking (Edge Question Series) by. .I think it's fair to say that I am a total John Brockman fan - I now have pretty much all the books in this collection and they are my absolute go-to source of Brain Food.

I think it's fair to say that I am a total John Brockman fan - I now have pretty much all the books in this collection and they are my absolute go-to source of Brain Food. I first came to this collection through the book This Will Make You Smarter, a collection of predominantly 2-page essays from some of the world's greatest thinkers on all sorts of issues.

Аудиокнига "This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking", John Brockman. Читает John Allen Nelson и Khristine Hvam. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

The answers, featuring a wealth of influential scientists, authors, and thought-architects, are released today in This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking (public library) - a formidable anthology of short essays by 151 of our time’s biggest thinkers on subjects as diverse as the power of networks, cognitive humility, the paradoxes of daydreaming, information flow, collective intelligence

What scientific concept would improve everybody’s cognitive toolkit? This is the question John Brockman .

What scientific concept would improve everybody’s cognitive toolkit? This is the question John Brockman, publisher of Edge. org, posed to the world’s most influential thinkers. Their visionary answers flow from the frontiers of psychology, philosophy, economics, physics, sociology, and more. Surprising and enlightening, these insights will revolutionize the way you think about yourself and the world. What scientific concept would improve everybody’s cognitive toolkit?

150 New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking.

150 New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking. series Edge Question Series.

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What scientific concept would improve everybody's cognitive toolkit? This is the question John Brockman, publisher of Edge. org, posed to the world's most influential thinkers

What scientific concept would improve everybody's cognitive toolkit? This is the question John Brockman, publisher of Edge. org, posed to the world's most influential thinkers. Surprising and enlightening, these insights will revolutionize the way you think about yourself and the world

What scientific concept would improve everybody's cognitive toolkit? This is the question John Brockman, publisher of Edge.

Edge.org presents brilliant, accessible, cutting-edge ideas to improve our decision-making skills and improve our cognitive toolkits, with contributions by Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Richard Dawkins, Brian Eno, Steven Pinker, and more. Featuring a foreword by New York Times columnist David Brooks and edited by John Brockman, This Will Make You Smarter presents some of the best wisdom from today’s leading thinkers—to make better thinkers out of the leaders of tomorrow.
  • Charyoll
The concept and the idea behind this book (and the other similar editions) is sound and interesting. Get a large number of relevant thinkers to give a short "taste" from their field and some sort of prediction.

And as a site online where you might click on ten or so, it is wonderful. But in a book collecting all 150? No so much.

First off a lot of the post don't really talk about concepts as such - more along the "wow it would be kinda cool..." Lines of late night discussions. Of those that do, some just tease it in less than a page, whilst others seem on a mini crusade and go on into minutiae of their pet project.

So, a book bringing the 10/25/50 best or most popular or most controversial might be a lot better. Leaving the rest of the "thanks for taking the time" online. Then I'd have understood the "edited by" on the cover.

But still four stars?

Yes, because here are a lot of nuggets here, and a lot of books to look into and people to explore further. I have a. Feeling I might have crept close to the max numbers if highlights in a single kindle book. And, as a time capsule it will be fun to have a look at in 20+ years time.
  • Ielonere
Brockman's books extracted from Edge.org are really hubs, that through their spokes (the essays they group together under one question) consent the reader to reach out and grab, experience, explore the often difficult to follow contemporary thought in many scientific disciplines. Otherwise we could define them as toolkits from which to extract the necessary tool that helps us out to better understand our ever changing world. The 2012 "This will make you smarter" are 153 essays that answer the question "What scientific concept would improve everybody's cognitive toolkit?"
The message very concise, that can be extracted from this book, is that a big part of modern scientific though is about metacognition. About the way we think. Naturally also this may be one of the many biases, because the question that was posed was thought up by Pinker and Kahneman, who themselves are the ideologist of cognitive biases.
Personal suggestion: this book is what was once the Reader's Digest: an instrument to know things, or what was going on, without having to really dig through all the books one was supposed to have read. Very useful in our fast paced world. However, insufficient to really explore modern scientific thought. So read it, let it sparkle your curiosity, but then go out and get the texts, explore the profiles of the authors, look up the words and concepts you like most. This is the best way to get the best out of this opus magnum and probably what Brockman wants you to do.
If the interest in these topics is sincere I believe Daniel Kahnemans "Thinking fast, thinking slow" must be the first read.
  • Deeroman
I love this book. Way too much. I had to purchase it for a class, but I ended up purchasing additional books from the Edge.com’s question of the year because I thought it was a fantastic idea. There are so many interesting topics and they have definitely changed my perspective of the world for the better.
  • Kahavor
Some interesting and insightful information but I was surprised by some confusing data. A few examples I remember 1)Holism - the maximum possible connections between 10 people is 45. Hmm, IF this means the maximum number of ways of arranging 10 people in different order, this is 10! = 3628800. 2)Powers of 10 - the difference between an earthquake magnitude 6 and magnitude 8 (a thousand times more energy)! There is no explanation of why 100 times more amplitude translates to 1000 times more energy. The author wonders why nonscientists are flummuxed by log scales. 3)Statistically Significant Difference - simply whether a p value falls either side of a pre-determined level of significance. Why confuse this with interpretations of the result. In general, there is an apparent desire of some authors to use more science in dealing with important societal issues. Others opine that science is usually proven incorrect. I find this ironic. Maybe we should task science with reducing annual US traffic fatalities (35 000) by 25%. Same for gun associated homicides (20 000). Good luck in getting politicians or anyone else to take on such specific goals. Plenty of data here to explain why this won't happen. Nonetheless an interesting read.