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Download For Reasons of Poverty: A Critical Analysis of the Public Child Welfare System in the United States eBook

by Leroy Pelton

Download For Reasons of Poverty: A Critical Analysis of the Public Child Welfare System in the United States eBook
ISBN:
0275930734
Author:
Leroy Pelton
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Praeger; y First printing edition (December 6, 1989)
Pages:
220 pages
EPUB book:
1762 kb
FB2 book:
1361 kb
DJVU:
1851 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
623


The public child welfare system has been increasingly attacked for failing to implement long-standing national policies, especially family preservation

The public child welfare system has been increasingly attacked for failing to implement long-standing national policies, especially family preservation. Pelton, a social work educator, continues this attack, but in a uniquely comprehensive, coherent, and compelling manner. analysis is powerful and provocative and should be required reading for all engaged or interested in child welfare.

For Reasons of Poverty book. The public child welfare system has been increasingly attacked for. The last chapter of the volume focuses on a plan for restructuring the child welfare system in the United States, which Pelton believes could be realistically accomplished within the larger ongoing economic and social welfare policy context. This book should be of particular interest to child welfare administrators in public and private agencies and to child welfare advocates and social workers.

Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:13:y:1991:i:3:p:217-222.

For Reasons of Poverty: A Critical Analysis of the Public Child Welfare System in the United States. J MARRIAGE FAM. Leroy H. Pelton. Additionally, it contains information applicable to a number of different fields, including social work, public policy, sociology, and psychology. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

The proportion of the public child welfare caseload in the United States consisting of nonwhite children . The vast majority of children in the child welfare system had always been from impoverished families (Pelton, 1989).

The proportion of the public child welfare caseload in the United States consisting of nonwhite children almost doubled between 1945 and 1961, from 14 percent to 27 percent. This increase was due not only to reduced racial discrimination within the child welfare system, but also to a large increase in the number of black children in the general population, and not coincidentally, to the fact that increasing proportions of poor children in the United States were black (Billingsley and Giovannoni, 1972). The vast majority of children in the child welfare system had always been from impoverished.

book by Leroy H.

In their book, Children of the Storm, Billingsley and Giovannoni (1972) reported that black children were largely .

In their book, Children of the Storm, Billingsley and Giovannoni (1972) reported that black children were largely excluded from the child welfare system up until the end of World War I, and that it was not until the end of World War II that they began to enter the system in large numbers. The proportion of the public child welfare caseload in the United States consisting of nonwhite children almost doubled between 1945 and 1961, from 14 percent to 27 percent.

Children without Homes: An Examination of Public Responsibility to. .For reasons of poverty: a critique of the child welfare system in the United States, .

Children without Homes: An Examination of Public Responsibility to Children in Out of Home Care. amp; Clarkson, D. (1980). Factors associated with placement decisions in Child Welfare, Child Welfare League of America. Investigating allegations of child maltreatment: the strengths and limitations of current risk assessment systems. Pike, . Downs, . Emlen, . & Case, D. (1977). Permanent planning for children in foster-care; a handbook for social workers.

Others say the welfare system (12)(not reward) individual initiative – it (13)(encourage) people to stay unemployed and .

Others say the welfare system (12)(not reward) individual initiative – it (13)(encourage) people to stay unemployed and spend, rather than save money. All of the studies and the arguments about poverty and public welfare programs show that Americans (14)(concern) about a problem that (15)(not solve) yet. Попроси больше объяснений.

Child poverty in the United States is widespread and growing. According to the census bureau, in 2012, almost 22% of children under the age 18, and 24% of children under 6, were living in poverty. 1999); LEROY PELTON, FOR REASONS OF POVERTY: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE PUBLIC CHILD WELFARE SYSTEM IN THE UNITED STATES (1989); Wendy Bach, The Hyperregulatory State: Women, Race, Poverty and Support, 25 Yale .

The public child welfare system has been increasingly attacked for failing to implement long-standing national policies, especially family preservation. Pelton, a social work educator, continues this attack, but in a uniquely comprehensive, coherent, and compelling manner. His well-documented critique focuses on the philosophical underpinnings and internal workings of public child welfare, especially its medicalization of child abuse; inappropriate out-of-home placement of children for reasons of poverty; excessive reliance on foster care; and dysfunctional dual structure (investigative versus helping roles). . . . [His] analysis is powerful and provocative and should be required reading for all engaged or interested in child welfare. Choice

This volume reveals how the modern public child welfare system and its forerunners have failed to serve professed child welfare policies that have been enunciated from the beginning of this century to the present. The basic dynamics, operational structure, and direction of the child welfare system are thoroughly scrutinized by Pelton with the intent of promoting productive controversy. One of the central issues discussed by the book is the separation of children from their parents by child welfare agencies. Evidence is presented that shows that, throughout this century, child removal has survived as a major tactic in regard to child welfare problems despite a long-standing policy of family preservation. This is the only book to be critical not only of the child welfare system, but of recent attempts to improve it, namely, the permanency planning movement. It is also the only one to propose an entirely new structure for the child welfare system.

For Reasons of Poverty begins with a historical review of child welfare through the twentieth century and then examines the crusade against child abuse. Next, the book covers the foster care system, the permanency planning movement, and the dual role of the child welfare system. The last chapter of the volume focuses on a plan for restructuring the child welfare system in the United States, which Pelton believes could be realistically accomplished within the larger ongoing economic and social welfare policy context. This book should be of particular interest to child welfare administrators in public and private agencies and to child welfare advocates and social workers. Additionally, it contains information applicable to a number of different fields, including social work, public policy, sociology, and psychology.