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Download Global Ethnography: Forces, Connections, and Imaginations in a Postmodern World eBook

by Michæl Burawoy,Joseph A. Blum,Sheba George,Millie Thayer,Zsuzsa Gille,Teresa Gowan,Lynne Haney,Maren Klawiter,Steve H. Lopez,Sean Riain

Download Global Ethnography: Forces, Connections, and Imaginations in a Postmodern World eBook
ISBN:
0520222164
Author:
Michæl Burawoy,Joseph A. Blum,Sheba George,Millie Thayer,Zsuzsa Gille,Teresa Gowan,Lynne Haney,Maren Klawiter,Steve H. Lopez,Sean Riain
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of California Press; First edition (October 2, 2000)
Pages:
410 pages
EPUB book:
1348 kb
FB2 book:
1947 kb
DJVU:
1976 kb
Other formats
lit azw lrf txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
462


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. This book shows how ethnography can have a global reach and a global relevance, its humanistic and direct methods actually made more not less relevant by recent developments in global culture and economy.

Michæl Burawoy, Joseph A. Blum, Sheba George, Millie Thayer, Zsuzsa Gille, Teresa Gowan, Lynne Haney, Maren Klawiter, Steve H. Lopez, Sean Riain. In contrast to the lofty debates between radical theorists, these nine studies excavate the dynamics and histories of globalization by extending out from the concrete, everyday world.

Global Ethnography Forces, Connections, and Imaginations in a Postmodern World. com meets ethnography. by Michael Burawoy (Author), Joseph A. Blum (Author), Sheba George (Author), Zsuzsa Gille (Author), Millie Thayer (Author). Globalisation& is not a singular, unilinear process, fatalistically unfolding towards inevitable ends: it entails gaps, contradictions, counter-tendencies, and marked unevenness.

Racial Profiling and Use of Force in Police Stops: How Local Events Trigger Periods of Increased Discrimination. The Mark of a Criminal Record.

By Michael Burawoy, Joseph A. Blum, Sheba George, Zsuzsa Gille, Teresa Gowan, Lynne Haney, Maren Klawiter, Steven H. Lopez, Seán Ó Riain, and Millie Thayer. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2000. Racial Profiling and Use of Force in Police Stops: How Local Events Trigger Periods of Increased Discrimination. Getting a Job: Is There a Motherhood Penalty? Correll et al.

Gille, Zsuzsa, and Seán Ó Riain.

Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. Gille, Zsuzsa, and Seán Ó Riain.

Social Forces 8. (2002) 1408-1410 This book is both an intellectual contribution to the emergent field of globalization ethnography and a pedagogical achievement of prime importance. Lo American Journal of Sociology The University of Chicago Press 0002--5390. Lo American Journal of Sociology The University of Chicago Press 0002--5390 1. 086/343174. blum, sheba george zsuzsa gille, teresa gowan, lynne haney, maren klawiter.

Forces, Connections, and Imaginations in a Postmodern World. Michael burawoy, joseph a. Steven h. lopez, sean ó riain, millie thayer. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS Berkeley Los Angeles London. Sheba George, 144. i3y. 6. Net-Working for a Living: Irish Software Developers in the Global Workplace. Seán Ó Riain, 775. 7. Traveling Feminisms: From Embodied Women to Gendered Citizenship.

Find nearly any book by Millie Thayer. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Global Ethnography: Forces, Connections, and Imaginations in a Postmodern World: ISBN 9780520222168 (978-0-520-22216-8) Softcover, University of California Press, 2000. Making Transnational Feminism (Perspectives on Gender).

In this follow-up to the highly successful Ethnography Unbound, Michael Burawoy and nine colleagues break the bounds of conventional sociology, to explore the mutual shaping of local struggles and global forces. In contrast to the lofty debates between radical theorists, these nine studies excavate the dynamics and histories of globalization by extending out from the concrete, everyday world. The authors were participant observers in diverse struggles over extending citizenship, medicalizing breast cancer, dumping toxic waste, privatizing nursing homes, the degradation of work, the withdrawal of welfare rights, and the elaboration of body politics. From their insider vantage points, they show how groups negotiate, circumvent, challenge, and even re-create the complex global web that entangles them. Traversing continents and extending over three years, this collaborative research developed its own distinctive method of "grounded globalization" to grasp the evaporation of traditional workplaces, the dissolution of enclaved communities, and the fluidity of identities. Forged between the local and global, these compelling essays make a powerful case for ethnography's insight into global dynamics.
  • Mash
This is a terrific collection of writings that push forward a new way of understanding globalization: through ethnography. I have found this to be a terrific tool for the classroom. Undergraduates want to understand what globalization is and what it means. Most writings on globalization are abstract, theoretical, and from 30,000 feet. The case studies in global ethnography give students a window onto what globalization means up close and personal for real people on the ground. Just terrific!
  • Alsardin
Having only read a few excerpts from this book about unemployment, homelessness and mental illness I have attempted to compare my own observations with those of some of the contributors. Much of the homelessness I see in my own Ontario city is due to the embrace of community mental health by the provincial government in the early seventies as a cost-saving mearsure in response to the unionization of attendants in these hospitals and resulting higher labor costs. The government felt these could be reduced by sending patients to various cities which were ill-equipped to deal with them. Soon the revolving door of hospital, rest home, street, hospital began. These patients form the core of the homeless population in my community. Displaced auto workers,even those from non-union companies, are much less likely to be homeless since they usually have family resources. Worse case scenarios do exist where years, even decades of alcohol and/or drug abuse have frayed family ties to the breaking point, resulting in a precarious 'couch-crashing' existence without rent money with which to afford even the lowest cost housing.
The author-editor's analysis of the effects of globalization on skilled and unskilled workers in various locations is strained through a Marxist utensil. He spoke at my alma mater today as a guest of the Social Justice League but I was unable to attend due to a working with the homeless schedule conflict. Had I been able to attend with a Romanian friend who's experience with communist societies is extensive, we would likely have heckled him as a dewey-eyed Berkeley Marxist unwilling to admit the past ecological disasters of Soviet Europe.