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Download Understanding Big Government: The Programme Approach (Sponsored by ECPR) eBook

by Richard Rose

Download Understanding Big Government: The Programme Approach (Sponsored by ECPR) eBook
ISBN:
0803997787
Author:
Richard Rose
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
SAGE Publications Ltd; 1 edition (July 1, 1984)
Pages:
259 pages
EPUB book:
1300 kb
FB2 book:
1453 kb
DJVU:
1907 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
573


work should be required reading for those on university courses on public policy and for any administrator or politician contemplating reforms in the machinery of government. - British Book News, June 1984.

work should be required reading for those on university courses on public policy and for any administrator or politician contemplating reforms in the machinery of government. - British Book News, June 1984 Like all Rose's books this volume is written in an easy style, the statistics are up-to-date, and the use of comparative material is impressive.

Understanding Big Government : The Programme Approach. Richard Rose answers these questions clearly and succinctly

Understanding Big Government : The Programme Approach. Richard Rose answers these questions clearly and succinctly.

Everybody talks about big government, but is it clear what people have in mind? Richard Rose's incisively written new book provides the ideas and .

Everybody talks about big government, but is it clear what people have in mind? Richard Rose's incisively written new book provides the ideas and information needed to understand how and why government grows. The programme approach examines government not only in terms of what it is, a set of organizations, but also in terms of what it does.

Semantic Scholar extracted view of "Rose R. : Understanding big government, The . oceedings{Hussenot1985RoseR, title {Rose R. : Understanding big government, The programme approach}, author {Philippe Hussenot}, year {1985} }. Philippe Hussenot

Semantic Scholar extracted view of "Rose R. : Understanding big government, The programme approach" by Philippe Hussenot. Philippe Hussenot.

Understanding Big Government book. Start by marking Understanding Big Government: The Programme Approach as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The programme approach relates what government is, a set of organizations, to what these institutions do, namely, mobilize laws, money and employees to produce public programmes. The programmes are concerned with such What grows when government grows? Why? What are the consequences for effectiveness and consent?

18 Rose,, Understanding Big Government, Chapters 1 and 7. 19 Larkey, et al. .27 Rose, Richard, ‘Maximizing Revenue and Minimizing Political Costs: A Comparative Dynamic Analysis’ (Salzburg: Annual ECPR Workshops, 1984).

27 Rose, Richard, ‘Maximizing Revenue and Minimizing Political Costs: A Comparative Dynamic Analysis’ (Salzburg: Annual ECPR Workshops, 1984).

Understanding Big Government: The Program Approach. CHAPTER EIGHT THE LIMITS OF BIG GOVERNMENT The Big Problem Balancing Fiscal Loads Effectiveness A Choice Between Priorities Consent The First Priority of Government The First Priorities of People References Index.

Sponsor -programming-books.

Rose, . Understanding Big Government: The Programme Approach. Sage, London (1984)Google Scholar. Presented at the ECPR Joint Sessions of Workshops, Salamanca, 10–15 April 2014 (2014)Google Scholar. 14. Russo, . Verzichelli, . The adoption of positive and negative parliamentarism: systemic or idiosyncratic differences? Presented at the ECPR Joint Sessions of Workshops, Salamanca, 10–15 April 2014 (2014)Google Scholar. 15. Van Mechelen, . Rose, . Patterns of Parliamentary Legislation.

What grows when government grows? Why? What are the consequences for effectiveness and consent? Richard Rose answers these questions clearly and succinctly. The programme approach relates what government is, a set of organizations, to what these institutions do, namely, mobilize laws, money and employees to produce public programmes. The programmes are concerned with such varied things as education, health, pensions, economic development, law and order and national defence.

There is a wealth of ideas and data about which governments are biggest, comparing America, Britain, Continental European and Scandinavian countries; when governments grow, comparing the affluent 1960s with the difficult 1970s and the uncertain 1980s; an