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Download The Libertarian Idea eBook

by Jan Narveson

Download The Libertarian Idea eBook
ISBN:
1551114216
Author:
Jan Narveson
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Broadview Press (April 4, 2001)
Pages:
367 pages
EPUB book:
1498 kb
FB2 book:
1972 kb
DJVU:
1311 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
382


Jan Narveson's The Libertarian Idea is a dense and thorough explanation and defense of libertarian theory.

Jan Narveson's The Libertarian Idea is a dense and thorough explanation and defense of libertarian theory. It's not quite as easy to read as Robert Nozick's famed Anarchy, State, and Utopia (also not a simple undertaking), but it is perhaps more comprehensive in laying out the foundations of libertarian theory. This project occupies Part 1 of the book, with Narveson taking explicit and welcome pains to avoid any appeals to moral intuition. Part 2 is dedicated to a defense of the theory laid out in part one, often by addressing specific objections to libertarianism.

The libertarian idea. by. Narveson, Jan, 1936-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Jan Narveson, influencedby Nozick and David Gauthier,is perhaps the most distinguished exception to this generalization. Nar-veson offersvery valuable classificationsof a large number of terms vital to any discussion of political philosophy, . freedom, rights, intervention, acquisition,etc. His out-standing new book is a thoroughgoing defense of libertarianism. Before turning to a discussion of the book, it is worth notingthat there is a group of philosophers sympathetic to libertarianism whose work has been to a large extent independent of Nozick. After a definition of libertarianism as the view that "the only relevant consideration in political matters.

The Libertarian Idea book. Jan Narveson's The Libertarian Idea is a dense and thorough explanation and defense of libertarian theory.

Libertarianism is both a philosophy and a political view Jan Narveson is Professor of Philosophy at Waterloo University. Библиографические данные. The Libertarian Idea. Broadview Press, 2001.

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Libertarianism is both a philosophy and a political view. Libertarianism is both a philosophy and a political view. All content in this area was uploaded by Jan Narveson on Jan 02, 2015. This may possibly become the long-overdue book on this very interesting but snag-ridden subject

The Libertarian Idea. How we measure 'reads'. This may possibly become the long-overdue book on this very interesting but snag-ridden subject.

Jan Narveson, OC (born 1936) is professor of philosophy emeritus at the University of Waterloo, in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Narveson was born in Erskine, Minnesota, United States. He studied at the University of Chicago where he obtained a .

Libertarianism is both a philosophy and a political view. The key concepts defining Libertarianism are: Individual Rights as inherent to human beings, not granted by government; a Spontaneous Order through which people conduct their daily interactions and through which society is organized independent of central (government) direction; the Rule of Law which dictates that everyone is free to do as they please so long as they do not infringe upon the rights of others; a Divided and Limited Government, checked by written constitution; Free Markets in which price and exchange is agreed upon mutually by individuals; Virtue of Production whereby the productive labour of the individual and any translation of that labour into earnings belongs, by right, to the individual who should not have to sacrifice those earnings to taxes; and Peace which has, throughout history, most commonly been disrupted by the interests of the ruling class or centralized government.

  • Gorisar
Good product
  • Hap
Jan Narveson's The Libertarian Idea is a dense and thorough explanation and defense of libertarian theory. It's not quite as easy to read as Robert Nozick's famed Anarchy, State, and Utopia (also not a simple undertaking), but it is perhaps more comprehensive in laying out the foundations of libertarian theory. This project occupies Part 1 of the book, with Narveson taking explicit and welcome pains to avoid any appeals to moral intuition. Part 2 is dedicated to a defense of the theory laid out in part one, often by addressing specific objections to libertarianism. Part 3 explores the application of libertarian thought to common social issues.

Everything is meticulously plotted and well-argued, but the pace and flow of Narveson's argument often suffer from frequent considerations of the various objections to libertarian theory. Perhaps this is a downside of (political) philosophy in general, since a thinker must always defend his ideas against challengers. Yet at times, Narveson devotes pages to quoting at length from critical works. The content remains strong, but the many stops and starts make for a less than straightforward read. Read Nozick first, and continue to Narveson if you want to explore the subject further.
  • Impala Frozen
Drawing on the recent work of David Gauthier, Jan Narveson has set out to provide libertarianism the foundations missing from Nozick's _Anarchy, State, and Utopia_.
In Part I, Narveson sets out to clarify the libertarian thesis, and in doing so, rescue it from charges of incoherence. This mainly involves a detailed refutation of the idea that by acquiring unowned property, one is infringing on the liberties of everyone else. Narveson also probes the negative / positive rights distinction and takes on the task of defining "liberty." This section is, of necessity, somewhat technical and nit-picky.
In Part II, Narveson examines the idea of moral foundations. He offers arguments against the stripe of intuitionism involving weird non-natural properties, utilitarianism, and any moral theory wherein moral facts are somehow perceived by intuition. In contrast, Narveson appeals to a social contract theory of morality, wherein moral principles are necessarily such that they would be agreed to by anyone in an amoral world. This is pretty strict Hobbesian stuff, minus the Sovereign solution to social problems. Narveson uses the rigorous work of Gauthier and a smattering of game theory to explain and clarify contractarianism and defend it against counterarguments. Finally, he offers general grounds for the plausibility of the libertarian thesis as an agreeable normative theory.
In Part III, Narveson examines all sorts of reasons for expanding the state past that size and function which the libertarian will accept (if, indeed, any state at all will be justified). Public goods theory, egalitarian "social justice" concerns, insurance "guaranteed minimum" arguments, etc. This section is less technical than the others, as Narveson is able to draw on a variety of reasons for supposing a state solution to be a poor one.
Overall, _The Libertarian Idea_ is a thorough and interesting read (made all the more so by Narveson's engaging prose and sense of humor). I would recommend it highly to anyone seeking a philosophical examination and justification of libertarianism.
  • Fountain_tenderness
Jan Narveson's "The Libertarian Idea" is truly a modern classic of political philosophy at the level of John Rawls' "A Theory of Justice" and Robert Nozick's "Anarchy, State and Utopia". Where Nozick just *assumes* that the individual has a set of moral rights, Narveson attempts to provide a *foundation* of such rights by drawing on David Gauthier's ground-breaking work in contractarian moral theory (Morals By Agreement).

In "The Libertarian Idea", as well as in his many other books and articles on moral and political theory, Narveson elegantly manages not only to make the controversial and radical political doctrine of libertarianism, but also the equally controversial and radical ethical doctrine of contractarianism, appear as the natural and common-sense ideas they really are. These theories have a lot going for them, and their combination is indeed very natural and grounds a powerful argument.

This book is very highly recommended both to those who want to get to know what libertarianism is about and to those who are already convinced libertarians, but would like to look into the contractarian foundation into which Narveson convincingly frames the libertarian idea.

Useful companions: Respecting Persons in Theory and Practice: Essays on Moral and Political Philosophy (a collection of papers by Narveson himself on ethical and political theory), Morals By Agreement (David Gauthier), Liberty, Games and Contracts (an anthology compiled by Malcolm Murray that brings together various critique of Narveson's ideas by a number of philosophers as well as replies by Narveson himself).

Fritz- Anton Fritzson
Lund University,
Sweden