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Download Sickened: The Memoir of a Munchausen by Proxy Childhood eBook

by Marc D. Feldman,Julie Gregory

Download Sickened: The Memoir of a Munchausen by Proxy Childhood eBook
ISBN:
0553803077
Author:
Marc D. Feldman,Julie Gregory
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bantam (September 30, 2003)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1650 kb
FB2 book:
1709 kb
DJVU:
1880 kb
Other formats
lrf mbr rtf lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
642


Julie Gregory (Author), Marc D. Feldman (Foreword). The first of its kind, this compelling memoir recounts the story of a childhood affected by Munchausen by proxy disease, .

Julie Gregory (Author), Marc D.

llyyyyyyyyy crapsickle. Julie Gregory memoirs her childhood as a munchausen by proxy victim and it’s a hell of a gawker story. Not as jarring as The Glass Castle in my opinion but still. Not as jarring as The Glass Castle in my opinion but stil. hris. hat the hell?

Sickened is a remarkable memoir that speaks in an original and distinctive Midwestern voice, rising to indelible scenes in prose of scathing beauty and fierce humor.

From early childhood, Julie Gregory was continually X-rayed, medicated, and operated on-in the vain pursuit of an illness that was created in her mother’s mind. Munchausen by proxy (MBP) is the world’s most hidden and dangerous form of child abuse, in which the caretaker-almost always the mother-invents or induces symptoms in her child because she craves the attention of medical professionals. Sickened is a remarkable memoir that speaks in an original and distinctive Midwestern voice, rising to indelible scenes in prose of scathing beauty and fierce humor.

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Julie Gregory, author of Sickened: The Memoir of a Munchausen by Proxy Childhood. In this masterful and unprecedented book, Dr. Marc Feldman has captured the essence of feigned illness and the underlying motivations for assuming the sick role.

Julie Gregory, author of Sickened: The Memoir of a Munchausen by Proxy Childhood. The origins and impact of 'playing sick' are clearly depicted with practical advice for those affected and a sensible approach to healing. - David G. Folks, Chair, Department of Psychiatry, University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Sickened: The Memoir of a Munchausen by Proxy Childhood by Julie Gregory Very interesting read on this often deadly form of child abuse. Scary to think how often this may go undetected. 60 Best Book Cover Designs of 2011. Clary And Sebastian Harry Potter Night Circus Circus Book Circus Circus Circus Poster Circus Theme Book Tag Show. The place to be when you love arts.

Sickened: The Memoir of a Münchausen by Proxy Childhood. Sickened was published in over 20 countries and was named Book Of The Year by The Sunday London Times

Sickened: The Memoir of a Münchausen by Proxy Childhood. When Gregory realized what her mother was doing to her, she tried telling people about it, but no one listened. They thought she was making up stories to gain attention, and had her go to "imagination counseling" to try to tame her from telling crazy stories of her parents. The memoir also alleges physical and emotional abuse inflicted by Gregory's father. Sickened was published in over 20 countries and was named Book Of The Year by The Sunday London Times.

Also, in the book, Gregory mentions being told by her mother that matches were suckers to ea. lt;/p

A young girl is perched on the cold chrome of yet another doctor’s examining table, missing yet another day of school. Just twelve, she’s tall, skinny, and weak. It’s four o’clock, and she hasn’t been allowed to eat anything all day. Her mother, on the other hand, seems curiously excited. She's about to suggest open-heart surgery on her child to "get to the bottom of this." She checks her teeth for lipstick and, as the doctor enters, shoots the girl a warning glance. This child will not ruin her plans.SickenedFrom early childhood, Julie Gregory was continually X-rayed, medicated, and operated on—in the vain pursuit of an illness that was created in her mother’s mind. Munchausen by proxy (MBP) is the world’s most hidden and dangerous form of child abuse, in which the caretaker—almost always the mother—invents or induces symptoms in her child because she craves the attention of medical professionals. Many MBP children die, but Julie Gregory not only survived, she escaped the powerful orbit of her mother's madness and rebuilt her identity as a vibrant, healthy young woman.Sickened is a remarkable memoir that speaks in an original and distinctive Midwestern voice, rising to indelible scenes in prose of scathing beauty and fierce humor. Punctuated with Julie's actual medical records, it re-creates the bizarre cocoon of her family's isolated double-wide trailer, their wild shopping sprees and gun-waving confrontations, the astonishing naïveté of medical professionals and social workers. It also exposes the twisted bonds of terror and love that roped Julie's family together—including the love that made a child willing to sacrifice herself to win her mother's happiness. The realization that the sickness lay in her mother, not in herself, would not come to Julie until adulthood. But when it did, it would strike like lightning. Through her painful metamorphosis, she discovered the courage to save her own life—and, ultimately, the life of the girl her mother had found to replace her. Sickened takes us to new places in the human heart and spirit. It is an unforgettable story, unforgettably told.
  • Kamuro
A well written book by a victim of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy. My only criticism is that the reader is left at the end really wanting to know the outcome of a confrontation between daughter and mother. Otherwise it's a fascinating story and the author writes well so that it's compelling to read, believable, and even allows reader to have some empathy for the perpetrator of this illness, because it is mental illness. I hope the author can deliver a another version with perhaps a resolution, or further development of the story after confrontation. Is there the possibility of healing between mother and daughter? Or has mother died or otherwise been unavailable? That would seem likely if mother doesn't wish to look at the truth or won't cooperate, but even that is a story. It's such an awful thing to look back at a portion of life, a large portion, wasted in such futile and meaningless efforts. I hope the author can find some peace with this and come to healing. The reason I think I am hooked by it is that I have been writing about my own mother, who was not a child abuser by any stretch of the imagination, but who I had a difficult relationship with and felt myself to be a sort of scapegoat out of a large family. I have come to peace with this, and am on good terms with my mother. But the whole process of delving into her life prior to my arrival on the scene gave me greater understanding of her need to control. I would certainly be interested in knowing more of the mother's background in this book. Thanks for a great read and for taking the time to write it well.
  • fightnight
I thank Julie Gregory for the exceptional opportunity of a rare inside glimpse of Munchausen by proxy. This is a fascinating read which I could not put down. I cried numerous times and in the end, I am awed by her inner strength. Surviving through MBP, physical, emotional, and verbal abuse throughout childhood is no easy fete, but to heal and become a healthy well balanced human being is the exception, not the rule.
I have had a life-long interest in somewhat obscure psychiatric disorders, MBP being among them. I've never before seen anything on the subject written by a survivor of this from of child abuse. Most children die long before adulthood. On the upside, I do believe there is more of an awareness today in the pediatric field of medicine. It's certainly nowhere near the level needed. Hopefully, with first-person accounts such as this, people in general, and physicians especially, will become much more aware, making these cases more readily identified.
  • Kazigrel
I was unable to set this one down until I finished it. Admittedly, the end was somewhat slower than the rest of the book, but it really helps the reader to understand how the main character moves forward and copes with her early life. I have read about numerous cases of Münchausen syndrome by-proxy, but this is the first time I have encountered a story that details how the perpetrator progresses from a seemingly normal person all the way to a psychologically, emotionally and physically abusive monster. I got chills reading some of this victim's earlier medical encounters that occurred solely due to the insistence of her mother, after years of routine medical encounters that make the mother seem like any other overbearing parents who takes their kid to the pediatrician.

Prepare to be uncomfortable as you read one of the most insightful pieces of literature you'll ever encounter on this topic. Prepare to grow with the author as she relives and shares her dark story from the beginning all the way through the her epiphany moment when she realizes what has happened to her. This is one of the most real works I have ever read.
  • DarK-LiGht
I'm a bit speechless. The ending was unexpected and only makes me hungry for more. Julie Gregory has awesome writing skills. I could not put this book down. The awful things she's went through has quite the shock value. But, I'm impressed that she doesn't allow any of it to hold her back. And instead, she breaks away from that 'cocoon' and evolves into a strong and independent woman. I'd love to meet her. She's like a hero to me because I can relate to her in some ways. I cannot say anymore, as I don't want to spoil it for anyone. But, I wish more people would read this book. Especially, caseworkers and doctors! I look forward to more from this very descriptive writer!
  • Truthcliff
This is a powerful autobiography. What an unimaginable childhood Julie Gregory had, with despicable parents pulling her into a "sick" web, literally. I have always been interested in medical and psychological subjects, and Munchausen by Proxy is such a strange manifestation of mental illness. This is a thoroughly engrossing read, and while I felt terrible sympathy for its author, I couldn't turn the pages fast enough. Kudos to Julie for rising above her crazy upbringing. I do hope she was successful in rescuing other foster kids from her parent's sick lair! They should never, ever be allowed to foster or adopt any children. SICKOS!
  • Yozshujind
This is one of the worst stories I’ve ever read; there were a number of moments that made me feel nauseated and enraged. That Julie Gregory survived this kind of abuse and STILL had to go about mentoring and healing herself because the mental/ health workers she turned to consistently denied the veracity of her experiences shocks me. I’m in awe of her ability to survive, I wish her well as she continues to recover, and I hope to hell she never speaks to the people who called themselves her parents again.