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Download The Unfettered Mind: Writings from a Zen Master to a Master Swordsman eBook

by Takuan Soho

Download The Unfettered Mind: Writings from a Zen Master to a Master Swordsman eBook
ISBN:
1590309863
Author:
Takuan Soho
Category:
Individual Sports
Language:
English
Publisher:
Shambhala; Reprint edition (June 12, 2012)
Pages:
144 pages
EPUB book:
1935 kb
FB2 book:
1625 kb
DJVU:
1728 kb
Other formats
azw lrf doc lit
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
214


Written by the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Soho (1573–1645). His best-selling books include The Book of Five Rings, The Unfettered Mind, and The Lone Samurai, a biography of Miyamoto Musashi. Paperback: 144 pages.

Written by the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Soho (1573–1645).

by Takuan Soho & William Scott Wilson. The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now. ― Chinese Proverb.

The Unfettered Mind book. Written by the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Soho (1573-1645), The Unfettered Mind is a book of advice on swordsmanship and the cultivation of right mind and intention. It was written as a guide for the samurai Yagyu Munenori, who was This classic samurai-era text fused Japanese swordsmanship with Zen and influenced the direction that the art has taken ever since.

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Written by the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Soho (1573–1645), The Unfettered Mind is a book of advice .

Written by the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Soho (1573–1645), The Unfettered Mind is a book of advice on swordsmanship and the cultivation of right mind and intention. It was written as a guide for the samurai Yagyu Munenori, who was a great swordsman and rival to the legendary Miyamoto Musashi. The Unfettered Mind was a major influence on the classic manifestos on swordsmanship that came after it, including Miyamoto Musashi's Book of Five Rings and Yagyu Munenori's Life-Giving Sword.

Written by the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Soho (1573–1645), The Unfettered Mind is. . Пользовательский отзыв - Kurt. Rocourt - LibraryThing.

The philosophy and competitive strategy presented by the spiritual mentor to Musashi is as useful to today's corporate warriors as it was to 17th century samurai. 150 people like this topic.

Written by the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Soho (1573–1645), The Unfettered Mind is a book of advice on swordsmanship and the cultivation of right mind and intention

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Written by the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Soho (1573–1645), The Unfettered Mind is a book of advice on swordsmanship and the cultivation of right mind and intention. Takuan was a giant in the history of Zen; he was also a gardener, calligrapher, poet, author, adviser to samurai and shoguns, and a pivotal figure in Zen painting.

The Unfettered Mind (不動智神妙録, fudōchi shinmyōroku) is a three-part treatise on Buddhist philosophy and martial arts written in the 17th century by Takuan Sōhō, a Japanese monk of the Rinzai sect. The title translates roughly to "The Mysterious Records of Immovable Wisdom".

This classic samurai-era text fused Japanese swordsmanship with Zen and influenced the direction that the art has taken ever since. Written by the seventeenth-century Zen master Takuan Soho (1573–1645), The Unfettered Mind is a book of advice on swordsmanship and the cultivation of right mind and intention. It was written as a guide for the samurai Yagyu Munenori, who was a great swordsman and rival to the legendary Miyamoto Musashi. Takuan was a giant in the history of Zen; he was also a gardener, calligrapher, poet, author, adviser to samurai and shoguns, and a pivotal figure in Zen painting. He was known for his brilliance and acerbic wit. In these succinct and pointed essays, Takuan is concerned primarily with understanding and refining the mind—both generally and when faced with conflict. The Unfettered Mind was a major influence on the classic manifestos on swordsmanship that came after it, including Miyamoto Musashi's Book of Five Rings and Yagyu Munenori's Life-Giving Sword.
  • Kanal
A ‘must read’ for those who would explore the concept of mindfulness, regardless of his/her profession, walk of life or spirituality. From a historical perspective, it was gratifying to see how the Zen philosophy was presented to and merged so seemlessly with the martial arts.

Two thumbs up. At times rather dense (or perhaps it is the denseness of the reviewer at work), but very much worth it.
  • Wnex
The Buddhist approach to life has never made more sense than it did after reading this book. I'd previously dismissed the general Buddhist worldview as too nihilistic (nothing is important or matters, etc.), but that is not at all the case. Plus it gives an amazing perspective on the idea of clearing your mind - it's not something you force, and it doesn't mean making your mind empty, but rather allowing it to flow. The letters primarily deal with martial arts (sword fighting, specifically). I've found the advice to apply very well to my own marital arts study; I practice a Chinese one rather than a Japanese art, but it still holds true. But the advice there is not limited to martial arts only, and I find its lessons coming to mind in day-to-day life as well. It's extremely practical, and doesn't ask you to be some ancient priest on a mountaintop somewhere. The translation reads well (I don't speak Japanese, so can't speak to its accuracy), and the translator helpfully includes notes explaining some of the references and metaphors that Soho used, which really fleshes out the imagery and helps make things understandable. This is one of my favorite philosophical books that I've read to date.
  • Fearlessdweller
Tremendous and insightful. However I would recommend this mostly for someone who is reasonably experienced both in meditation and in their profession as these things will be hard for a beginner to assimilate and apply.
  • Aver
Very deep and enlightening book on zen, martial arts, oriental philosophy and bushido. Highly recommended for anyone trying to grasp some japanese and chinese ways of thinking.
  • Dorizius
I originally read the Book of the Five Rings and this book was recommended as well. I found the underlying philosophical approach of this book to be superior to that of the Book of the Five Rings.
  • Truthcliff
This is my second copy of this book-the first is marked up with underlining and margin notes.

There is more to this collection that the first, second, third or even tenth reading!

Highly recommended as an addition to your library regardless of your discipline!
  • Pooker
Takuan is one of my sources for inspiration, and I value this work. He was born during the Warring States period in 1573 into a Samurai family of the Miura clan, and entered a Jodo-sect Buddhist monastery when he was 10. He joined the Zen Rinzai sect when he was 14, and made history by becoming the abbot of Daitokuji, one of the major temples in Kyoto, at the young age of only 30.

He was a prolific writer who composed over 6 major volumes, of which this is but a small fragment. The three works contained here were all written to great sword masters including Yagyu Munenori, and last piece was possibly to the head of the Itto school of swordsmanship, Ono Tadaaki. The purpose of these works is to unify the spirit of Zen with the spirit of the sword. To transcend the physical duel and have unbroken awareness of everything in the moment.

This is not a book to read quickly and hope to find entertainment or a lesson in history. This is deep martial philosophy written by an absolute genius and master of some of the highest arts in ancient Japan. The book contains a few images of his art and calligraphy, but unless you know what to look for it is hard to see just how great his work is. I bought a repo scroll of his calligraphy when last I was in Japan. There is a standout quality about his style in that his scripting appears three dimensional. In fact, it is almost impossible for at least my mind to follow some of the path. Never seen anything like it. I own an original Tesshu who was a great master, but there is something unique and special about Takuan's style that suggests he may have indeed been operating on a whole different level.

"The unfettered Mind" is very advanced stuff. This is not a casual read, and it will appeal to experienced martial artists willing to work with it and apply deep meditation to the many concepts that may not be apparent at first glance. This is one of the greats.
the departure was on time and every thing as expected.
This book, specially the first chapter has became one of my bases of thinking