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Download The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest eBook

by G. Weston Dewalt,Anatoli Boukreev

Download The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest eBook
ISBN:
0312168144
Author:
G. Weston Dewalt,Anatoli Boukreev
Category:
Mountaineering
Language:
English
Publisher:
St Martins Pr; 1st edition (November 1, 1997)
Pages:
255 pages
EPUB book:
1694 kb
FB2 book:
1861 kb
DJVU:
1126 kb
Other formats
azw mbr doc mobi
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
379


Boukreev heroically rescued several climbers from certain death. For those who do not know this book discuses the 1996 tragedy on Everest that befell two climbing teams

Boukreev heroically rescued several climbers from certain death. For those who do not know this book discuses the 1996 tragedy on Everest that befell two climbing teams. Krakauer's book (into thin air ) is usually regarded by the public as the main source of what happened on the mountain.

Alone and climbing blind, Anatoli Boukreev brought climbers back from the edge of certain death

Alone and climbing blind, Anatoli Boukreev brought climbers back from the edge of certain death. Categories: History\Memoirs, Biographies.

The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest by Anatoli Boukreev. Nov 21, 2014 Petra-X rated it it was amazing. The business is booming and, unfortunately, that has meant many climbers attempting Everest (and other harrowing peaks) with less-than-minimal experience and questionable motives.

Crowded conditions slowed their progress. Disoriented and out of oxygen, climbers struggled to find their way down the mountain as darkness approached.

Anatoli Boukreev was one of the world's foremost high-altitude mountaineers, arguably the finest of his generation. The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest by Anatoli Boukreev. Показать все 3 объявления с новыми товарами. The Climb : Tragic Ambitions on Everest by G. Weston DeWalt, G. Weston Dewalt and Anatoli Boukreev (1999, Paperback, Revised). 7 оценок товара Об этом товаре.

Boukreev, Anatoli; DeWalt, G. Weston.

This climbing included a successful climb of M. 4 Lewis, Jon. The mammoth book of how it happened - Everest.

This climbing included a successful climb of Mt. Everest. Ball and Hall financed this venture via a set of corporate sponsorship. London: Constable & Robinson Ltd, 2012.

A member of a climbing team that tried to take the summit of Everest in May 1996 shares the gripping true story of what happened when another climbing group was overcome by snow, wind, and lack of oxygen. 25,000 first printing. Tour.
  • Brazil
After watching the 2015 Everest film I became a sponge for all things about the 1996 Everest tragedy watching 4 documentaries, reading Jon Krakauer and Lou Kasischke's books. Just finished The Climb (TC) a few hours ago and loved it.

For those who do not know this book discuses the 1996 tragedy on Everest that befell two climbing teams. Krakauer's book (into thin air [ITA]) is usually regarded by the public as the main source of what happened on the mountain. In that book Krakauer was critical to Anatoli who then released this book to defend himself and his actions (by not using supplemental oxygen and for descending the mountain rapidly before the team). I felt bad that Anatoli got a bad wrap for 1996 when he risked his own life several times to save other climbers.

This is a great read for any Everest junkies and is really the only main book that shows what happened on the Mountain Madness team (Krakauer and Lou's books are from the other teams POV). The book offers some really good insight into Scott Fischer and the other MM climbers. IMHO it also clearly explain why Anatoli did not use supplemental oxygen as well as why he did a rapid descent.

The first 60% of the book covers 1996. The next chapter details his next expedition back up Everest and how he made make-shift graves for Scott and Yasuko Namba as well as took their small effects to give back to their families. Classy move imho.

The last 30% of the book is a group transcript of the MM group discussing the tragedy shortly after it happened and is a great read.

I am not going to get into who is right or wrong and will let you decide for yourself. All I will say is that this is a great read and if you read Krakauer's book you are only getting 1 side of the story. imo all three books should be read as they are all great reads but also from three distinct POVs.

Notes:
Worth The Money: Yes! (easily)
Would I Recommend It: Yes!
  • EROROHALO
The story of the man who risked everything to save lost climbers

May 10, 1996, was the day eight climbers died on Mount Everest. Four climbers from Rob Hall’s Adventure Consultants Expedition, including Rob; Scott Fisher, leader of the Mountain Madness Expedition; and three climbers from an Indo-Tibetan Border Police Expedition that were scaling Everest from the opposite side died of falls or exposure. A member of the Taiwanese Expedition had died the day before from a fall. Against all odds and left to for dead, Beck Weathers stumbled into camp under his own steam.

As Anatoli states, he is writing this book as a rebuttal to a perceived disparaging account of his actions in Jon Krakauer's book Into Thin Air. Anatoli explains his decision to climb without supplementary oxygen, the reasoning behind his decision to leave Yasuko Namba for dead and why since Beck did survive Anatoli had not brought him into camp.

While some have hailed Anatoli as a near superhuman hero and others as a man devoted only to his own clients, I do not get that sort of feeling from his words. Anatoli felt that anyone would have done what he did if he or she were able. He mourned over Yasuko, gathered her personal item for her family, and even buried her where she fell. He has said he did not know where Beck was, as Beck had become separated from the others.

His words have the ring of truth. Only those on the mountain that day could pass judgment on any decision made by anyone else who went through the same disastrous day. Each saw things from his or her perspective. Anatoli may not have thought himself a hero, but those that he aided can and have said differently!

I give the book four stars…

Quoth the Raven…
  • Malodor
First I read Krakauer's book and I wanted to have a good opinion from a guide's point of view. At first the book was a breath of fresh air. No drama, everything from the expedition explained professionally. But after the first half of the book the whole point of it became to explain over and over the same facts already stated. As if Boukreev needed some reassurance. Dude, you were the professional there, you did whatever you thought best and that was that. Accidents happen, and whoever has been on a mountain knows mountain weather can change quickly, so don't beat yourself up, you don't need to explain.
The book could have easily been cut shorter and made an awesome book, but after the first half it becomes so repetitive it's painful to read. Could have been 5 stats.
  • Shem
Truly great read. The author interviewed Mr. Boukreev extensively and even had long sections of Anatolys own words. I liked the style, he never put words in his mouth. He clearly credited Anatoly when he "spoke". The book gives a great view of the 1996 Everest tragedy from anther viewpoint (Not John Krakaur's) and clearly gives Anatoly a chance to point out what he felt had happened.
I read it while wind bound at 5500 Meters while climbing Aconcagua. My partner read it also along with one of the Italians. Everyone really enjoyed it. It's a treasured possession..
  • Modar
I really liked this book. It is not necessary a story that will give you answers but it does not place blame either. It sticks to the facts and the logic and thought process of the guide. I only gave 4 stars because the very last portion of the book was a bit monotonous with the guides thought process and infighting with another writer. It also includes the transcript of the climbers after the tragedy. That only serves to be annoying because of some of the responses. At times it seemed very petty and juvenile.
  • Rainpick
I thought it was a very interesting read after reading into thin air. Boukreev actually backed up his side with inputs from other climbers that were there whereas Krakauer wrote a good story and went back to his tent to sleep Don't get me wrong, i did enjoy 'into thin air', but his commentary came from his position in the climb. Regardless of which side you want to take on the whole debacle, 'the climb' is a good read and adds a lot to the story of what happened on Everest in 1996