almediah.fr
» » The Mountain West: Interpreting the Folk Landscape (Creating the North American Landscape)

Download The Mountain West: Interpreting the Folk Landscape (Creating the North American Landscape) eBook

by Professor Terry G. Jordan,Professor Jon T. Kilpinen,Professor Charles F. Gritzner

Download The Mountain West: Interpreting the Folk Landscape (Creating the North American Landscape) eBook
ISBN:
0801854318
Author:
Professor Terry G. Jordan,Professor Jon T. Kilpinen,Professor Charles F. Gritzner
Category:
Architecture
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Johns Hopkins University Press (November 4, 1996)
Pages:
192 pages
EPUB book:
1585 kb
FB2 book:
1195 kb
DJVU:
1111 kb
Other formats
lrf mobi rtf lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
450


The Mountain West book. The Mountain West: Interpreting The Folk Landscape.

The Mountain West book. Start by marking The Mountain West: Interpreting The Folk Landscape as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. by. Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov

Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov (1938–2003; also published as Terry G. Jordan) was a professor at the Department of Geography and the Environment at University of Texas at Austin and a specialist in the cultural and historical geography of the United States.

Terry G. He authored several influential scholarly books and articles and a widely adopted introductory textbook. Jordan-Bychkov served as president of the American Association of Geographers (AAG) in 1987 and 1988.

Find nearly any book by Professor Jon T. Kilpinen. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Professor Terry G. Jordan, Professor Jon T. Kilpinen, Professor Charles F. Gritzner. ISBN 9780801854316 (978-0-8018-5431-6) Hardcover, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.

Series: Creating the North American Landscape . Jordan and Matti Kaups studied America's frontier culture to discern its ethnic heritage. Most historians of the American frontier locate its origin in the vicinity of the Delaware Valley. In this book, Jordan and Kaups trace America's frontier culture to a surprising corner of Europe's "hard scrabble periphery. In the 1700s, about a century before Davy Crockett, residents of this corner of Europe depicted their frontiersmen fighting bears! Jordan and Kaups consider evidence from literature, anthropology and architecture.

The Mountain West Interpreting the Folk Landscape Creating the North American Landscape. Jordan's most recent l . Jordan's most recent l study of material culture in western North America will be of interest to folklorists specializing in vernacular architecture and to those interested in the West as a cultural region. In this book Jordan teams up with Jon T. Kilpinen and Charles F. Gritzner, cultural geographers, like Jordan, who have published previously about western log architecture. The authors' method consists of sampling the "greater artifacts" still extant on the western landscape (9). These greater artifacts are log dwellings and outbuildings, wooden fences, and hay stackers, cribs, and shelters.

Myth, image, and fantasy find their basis in a reality: the West is not like the East in a variety of measurable ways, in climate, terrain, religion, politics, an. .by Terry G. Jordan-Bychkov and Charles F. Select Format: Hardcover. Select Condition: Like New.

Professor of Geography and Dean, College of Arts and Sciences. Journal Articles and Book Chapters. University of Texas at Austin (1994). With Terry G. Jordan and Charles F. Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997. The Mountain Horsebarn, in Baseball, Barns, and Bluegrass: A Geography of American Folklife, 1998. Finnish Cultural Landscapes in the Pacific Northwest in Pacific Northwest Quarterly, Winter 1994/1995.

The Mountain West: Interpreting the Folk Landscape (with Terry G. Gritzner). Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997. The Mountain West: Interpreting the Folk Landscape (with Terry G. Why is the West-both in the United States and Canada-not like the East?

Why is the West--both in the United States and Canada--not like the East? Traditionally, two answers have been given to the question: Either the West is a pioneer culture--the old frontier moved westward from what we now call the East--or the West is a unique subculture originating in a human response to the demands of a dry, rugged physical environment.

In this groundbreaking volume, Terry Jordan and his co-authors look to the log folk buildings of the Mountain West, from New Mexico to Alaska, to explain why the West is "the West." Arguing that artifacts such as dwellings, barns, and fences can, if correctly interpreted, reveal much about the origins and character of the regional culture, they set forth not only the first comprehensive description and analysis of Western folk architecture but also a systematic explanation of the culture of the West.

"The West," the authors conclude, "is at once indigenous and imported, innovative and ultraconservative, Anglo-American and ethnic, unitary and plural." Westerners tinkered, invented, modified, and diversified. No single adaptive strategy brought to the West worked flawlessly in the new habitat. By extensive field investigation of still-extant folk houses, fences, barns, hay derricks, and cabins--all elements of material culture--they explain what the land tells us about the West.