almediah.fr
» » Form Follows Fiasco: Why Modern Architecture Hasn't Worked

Download Form Follows Fiasco: Why Modern Architecture Hasn't Worked eBook

by Peter Blake

Download Form Follows Fiasco: Why Modern Architecture Hasn't Worked eBook
ISBN:
0316099406
Author:
Peter Blake
Category:
Architecture
Language:
English
Publisher:
Atlantic-Little, Brown; 1st edition (1977)
Pages:
169 pages
EPUB book:
1510 kb
FB2 book:
1367 kb
DJVU:
1281 kb
Other formats
rtf mobi lrf docx
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
884


Form Follows Fiasco book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Form Follows Fiasco: Why Modern Architecture Hasn't Worked as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Form Follows Fiasco book. Start by marking Form Follows Fiasco: Why Modern Architecture Hasn't Worked as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Blake, Peter, 1920-2006. An Atlantic Monthly Press book. page 48-49 are missing in the book. Functionalism (Architecture), Architecture, Modern. Boston : Little, Brown.

From Front Jacket: "Peter Blake says the most outrageous things about contemporary architecture and city planning

From Front Jacket: "Peter Blake says the most outrageous things about contemporary architecture and city planning.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. ZOOM 001 : zero hour for operative opening models.

Why is Peter Blake shaking a fist at Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and other dead masters of the once-""Modern Movement""? Who today will argue that the functionalist aesthetic yielded such decidedly unfunctional results as antiseptic Brasilia and-at more.

Why is Peter Blake shaking a fist at Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and other dead masters of the once-""Modern Movement""? Who today will argue that the functionalist aesthetic yielded such decidedly unfunctional results as antiseptic Brasilia and-at more Pruitt-Igoe? In his disenchantment with open-plan offices and open-plan homes, with machine-made building materials that don't stand up like stone or brick, with heat-transmitting glass facades and windswept plazas, he fails to discriminate between ideal and application-or to balance the egregi.

The Modern Movement: Theory and Criticism. View author's works on this site. Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians Vol. 38 No. 1, Ma. 1979 (pp. 49-50) DOI: 1. 307/989350.

Peter Blake, chairman of the Boston Architectural Center, is one critic who can practice what he preaches. He has designed some 50 buildings, ranging from houses to schools, churches and a theater. Recently Blake discussed his love-hate relationship with modern architecture with Lee Wohlfert for PEOPLE.

Robert M. Craig, Peter Blake. Published: 1 April 1979. Keywords: Form Follows Fiasco, Modern Architecture Hasn't Worked.

Items related to Form Follows Fiasco: Why Modern Architecture Hasn't. Form Follows Fiasco: Why Modern Architecture Hasn't Worked. 169 p. 133 ill. A witty and searing indictment of the modernist movement in architecture and its fallacies grouped together under a series of "fantasies" by a practicing architect and critic well-versed in modernist principles. Eleven "Fantasies" are exposed: The Fantasy of Function; of the Open Plan; of Purity; of Technology; of the Skyscraper; of the Ideal City; of Mobility; of Zoning; of Housing; of Form; and, in conclusion, of Architecture. Bookseller Inventory 010363. Ask Seller a Question.

Peter Jost Blake, American architect. No Place Like Utopia: Modern Architecture and the Company We Kept. Form Follows Fiasco - Why Modern Architecture Hasn't Worked. Recipient Howard Myers award for architectural journalism, 1960; Graham Foundation Advanced Studies in Fine Arts fellow, 1962, several grants; Ford Foundation grantee, 1960; distinguished design fellow National Endowment for Arts, 1984. Served with Army of the United States, 1943-1947, European Theatre of Operations. No Place Like Utopia: Modern Architecture and the Company We Kept ) .

Skillfully blending documentation and illustrations, and gradually sharpening polemic and humor, Blake calmly explodes the fantasies of modern dogma that most architects once accepted. Such truisms as 'form follows function', 'the open plan,' and 'purity of design' are exposed as volatile ideas. The intricately planned, artistically designed components of the Ideal City have divided urban areas into tidy ghettos of culture, education, business, residence...even pornography...alienating individuals and threatening not only the economic futures of our cities, but civilized aspects of life in the West as well.This book calls for the slaughtering of the sacred cows of the Modern Movement, for a moratorium on the destruction of existing buildings and historic landmarks, and for an end to the construction of skyscrapers, new highways in developed nations, and single-use zoning. Blake demands legislation to hold building industries responsible for performance of their products, and a restructuring for performance of their products, and a restructuring of architectural education into something more basic and more human.
  • Kashicage
Good criticism of modern architecture.
  • wanderpool
Peter Blake's 1976 attack on the Modern Movement, as he characterizes it, tells of many negatives and few positives in this once-dominant style of architecture. Eleven chapter headings all starting with "The Fantasy of...." dissect, individually: function, the open plan, purity, technology, the skyscraper, the ideal city, mobility, zoning, housing, form, and architecture itself. All fall short. According to Blake, "The Modern Movement--the creed in which we were raised and to which we pledged allegiance throughout our professional lives--has reached the end of the road."

As it happens, time has modified Modern Movement to the extent that it is no longer a dominant creed, without,however, replacing it with any single new movement. Architecture is now more diverse and and complex and seems destined never to return to the narrower views of early modernism. Rather than coming to an end of the road, the road branched off into many new directions, one of which remains modernism, without the capital letter.

A flavor of his writing is this: "Few of the architects ever move into one of their own ephemeral creations. They know what is best for them--places with solid walls, solid doors, and real windows that let in real air and real light. The open plan is for somebody else, preferably someone who is deaf to noise, blind to views, and equipped with his or her own portable supply of air." As a caricature of architecture, it has an element of truth. It is not, however, an accurate description of the diversity of modern architecture past or present.
  • Samardenob
I'm not an expert, but I shared a dislike of modern large-scale architecture with the author, so I bought this book. A non-specialist can easily understand it, and it's short. It touches on all kinds of trends in architecture, commenting briefly so even the uninitiated reader gets a sense of where weak arguments have been put forth by the community. The book has all kinds of recommendations. The author is the ex-editor of Architectural Forum magazine, etc., so you're getting informed and useful opinion. Recommended for all architects and anyone involved with urban planning in their own city.
  • Buge
I really enjoyed this book. We've all done it, we've been in front of some shiney new "modern" building, sometimes with rain streaking it's flat concrete facade, or the sun baking it and reflecting the heat onto your face, and you're told this building has been "designed" by "experts" and yet... and yet... IT'S UGLY! Finally here's a book by someone with valid architectural credentials showing that the "emperor has no clothes", especially the emperors of the Bauhaus movement whose unlovely buildings and un-sitable chairs grace every book on design. As you can tell, this book really hit home for me.

The author also works in a great many specific examples of great beginnings that have turned out to be hollow over time. I was especially fascinated to learn Buckminster Fuller's giant geodesic dome for the 1967 Montreal World's fair burned in a spectacular 30 minute fire in the 70's. (Google for the photos, they're awesome). It seems that plexiglass panels were not such a great building material after all! A welder's torch set one on fire and they all went up. The metal frame remains.

There are other wonderful little tidbits here too. I highly recommend this book to anyone with even a passing interest in architecture, or who has had to live/work in one of these monstrosities.
  • adventure time
Here's an oft forgotten book, that shouldn't be. At a time when the large majority of people still resist modernist architecture...as opposed to new architecture...this book explicates the reasons why. The majority will say that modern architecture is hard, cold, expensive, and unsuitable for comfortable living. Blake posits the facts: That the earliest modernists were abstract theorists, and as such their greatest failure was...and continues in modernism's latest iterations...in not designing for how people actually live.

Blake notes that such work is designed out of the abstract industrial aesthetic. An aesthetic, fitted into the deductive planning mentality, affecting the public from the top-down, instead of vica-versa. The author underlines as well, that beauty, harmony, order , and the recognition of urban context have not been the virtues of modernist 20th century work.

This book still has validity, for in architecture today, our traditional architectural heritage is being rediscovered...not in the sense of work to be copied...but work to be stimulative, and to be learned from. The modernist cry against traditionalism has always been; "Pastiche!". But the truth is that modernists themselves...still widely populating architecture schools...are guilty of their own emulations of the modern "masters". This could be laudable if the work, as Blake amply illustrates, has not been so horribly bad.

Blake demonstrates, and my taste informs me, how so much of work today has become "look at me" design, by enfant-terrible starchitects....building often wildly abstract, impractical designs for human use...buildings that in fact, leak. Blake points out that Modernism has left us a legacy of unlovable architecture...often quite actively ugly. This remains as true today as it was in 1977, when he wrote this forthright mea culpa.

As an architect himself, and former editor of "Architectural Forum" magazine, he was well positioned to make his warnings. Is is a misfortune for us all, they were not heeded....though modernism continues to be suspect by the public. Today Blake's views retain their freshness and contemporary connection. He deserves to be rediscovered by the profession itself.