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Download Discoveries: Dada: The Revolt of Art eBook

by Marc Dachy

Download Discoveries: Dada: The Revolt of Art eBook
ISBN:
0810992558
Author:
Marc Dachy
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harry N. Abrams (April 1, 2006)
Pages:
128 pages
EPUB book:
1335 kb
FB2 book:
1691 kb
DJVU:
1665 kb
Other formats
mobi lit rtf doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
866


Dada is unquestionably "the Art of Revolt" as stated in the book's subtitle, most of all a revolt against the useless .

Dada is unquestionably "the Art of Revolt" as stated in the book's subtitle, most of all a revolt against the useless slaughter of World War One & the collapse of pre-war civilized Europe. To quote Jean Arp: "We were looking for an elementary type of art that we thought would save mankind from the raging madness of those times. This art quickly became the object of general reprobation.

Start by marking Dada: The Revolt of Art (Discoveries) as Want to Read . A rather short overview of the Dada movement, part of a series of small format introductory paperback books on various artists and schools; very heavily illustrated.

Start by marking Dada: The Revolt of Art (Discoveries) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The book consists of four chapters; one on the origins of the movement in Zurich, one on the Berlin (and other German) Dadaists, one on the "Dada diaspora" in New York and elsewhere, and one on the Paris movement and the collapse of Dada.

Dada had an immense effect on art throughout the 20th century. Marc Dachy has studied and written about many avant-garde movements over the past thirty years and has published several volumes on Dada. Its emphasis on machines reflected similar mechanistic currents in art through the war years; its appropriation of advertising imagery was revived in Pop Art in later decades; and its anti-aesthetic, anti-object, and anti-art principles persisted in important spurs of artistic theory and practice through the end of the century. In 2005 he organized the exhibition " in Tokyo and published the "Archives du Mouvement Dada". He lives in Paris, France.

Though it only lasted a decade from 1915, the outpourings of Dada - art, collages, plays - remain the stuff of the avant-garde, from Schwitters's sound poems to Duchamp's urinal. A punch-up with the Surrealists during Tzara's play The Gas Heart marked the end of the movement, though not of its influence. Independent culture newsletter.

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Home Marc Dachy Discoveries: Dada: The Revolt of Art. Stock Image. Discoveries: Dada: The Revolt of Art. Marc Dachy. In 2005 he organized the exhibition Murayama/Schwitters in Tokyo and published the Archives du Mouvement Dada. I will do my best to address your concerns including 100% refund of your money.

Dada was a protest by a group of European artists against World War I. .Marc Dachy has written widely on Dada and the Surrealists. Save on Non-Fiction Books. Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days.

Dada was a protest by a group of European artists against World War I, bourgeois society, and the conservativism of traditional thought. Its followers used absurdities and non sequiturs to create artworks and performances which defied any intellectual analysis. He is currently writing Dada, New Dada for the exhibition Tristan Tzara. Country of Publication. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Save on Non-Fiction Books.

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Product Category : Books.

Well-written, loaded with information, and with a rich assortment of illustrations, each Discoveries(r) volume is a look at one facet of art, archaeology, music, history, philosophy, popular culture, science, or nature.

Well-written, loaded with information, and with a rich assortment of illustrations, each Discoveries(r) volume is a look at one facet of art, archaeology, music, history, philosophy, popular culture, science, or nature. These innovatively designed, affordably priced, compact paperbacks bring ideas to life and amplify our understanding of civilization in a new way. Dada was one of the most important and influential movements in 20th-century art. Beginning in the anti-establishment climate around World War I, it encompassed painting, sculpture, photography, poetry and language, graphic design, film, performing arts, and criticism in Europe and America. Dada had an immense effect on art throughout the 20th century. Its emphasis on machines reflected similar mechanistic currents in art through the war years; its appropriation of advertising imagery was revived in Pop Art in later decades; and its anti-aesthetic, anti-object, and anti-art principles persisted in important spurs of artistic theory and practice through the end of the century. The movement's history is outlined in this concise, readable text-the only short introduction devoted exclusively to Dada, supplemented with essential documents and a useful bibliography.
  • Thabel
The book was fine, but I was a little concerned when I received it and realized that it was a library book -- complete with call number stickers, library scan codes, and check-out slips with date stamps.

Substantively, it had a lot of images (in full color on glossy paper, so that was nice), but it was very biographical of key DADA figures and didn't really discuss the artwork, etc. in depth.
  • Ionzar
There are quite a few excellent books about Dada, but the problem for the beginner is: Where to start? I think you can't do much better than this slim but richly packed volume in the Discoveries series, which provides a clear history & timeline of the movement, plenty of art & photographs, and a representative sampling of important Dada documents.

Dada is unquestionably "the Art of Revolt" as stated in the book's subtitle, most of all a revolt against the useless slaughter of World War One & the collapse of pre-war civilized Europe. To quote Jean Arp: "We were looking for an elementary type of art that we thought would save mankind from the raging madness of those times. We aspired to a new order that could re-establish the balance between heaven and hell. This art quickly became the object of general reprobation. It was hardly surprising that the 'bandits' could not understand us. Their puerile obsession with authoritarianism demands that even art should serve to stupefy mankind."

A statement, by the way, that remains equally true today, as the "civilized" world savagely tears at itself & those at the top divide the spoils, same as it ever was a century ago.

While Dada of course gave birth to Surrealism, with many Dadaists making the transition, there's a striking difference between the two movements. Surrealism was more in the Romantic vein -- something I dearly love -- and it sought to create new forms of beauty, to restore the wonder that the everyday world of power & money had lost. Dada was far more scathing & acerbic, sickened by the meaningless carnage of war, enraged by the eager acquiescence of the public to those who sent so many of their sons to die in the trenches. While my creative heart does belong to Surrealism, there's a burning place in it for Dada as well. This little book will explain to any reader why that is -- highly recommended!