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Download Ancestral Images: The Iconography of Human Origins eBook

by Clive Gamble,Stephanie Moser

Download Ancestral Images: The Iconography of Human Origins eBook
ISBN:
0801435498
Author:
Clive Gamble,Stephanie Moser
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cornell University Press; First Edition edition (May 21, 1998)
Pages:
224 pages
EPUB book:
1292 kb
FB2 book:
1849 kb
DJVU:
1104 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
899


Stephanie Moser analyzes the close relationship between representations of the past and theories about human evolution.

His iconography is greatly inspired by biblical dreams and characterized by the juxtaposition in a same image of the dreamer’s figure and dream’s object. No autobiographic image of dream is to be found before Dürer’s famous watercolour. A good many medieval images show however that painters were also concerned to express the dreamer’s subjective experience.

Ancestral Images book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Ancestral Images: The Iconography Of Human Origins as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Ancestral Images: The.

Moser treats images as primary documents, and her book is lavishly illustrated with engravings, paintings .

Moser treats images as primary documents, and her book is lavishly illustrated with engravings, paintings, photographs, and reconstructions. In surveying the iconography of prehistory, Moser explores visions of human creation from their origins in classical, early Christian, and medieval periods through traditions of representation initiated in the Renaissance. She looks closely at the first scientific reconstructions of the nineteenth century, which dramatized and made comprehensible the Darwinian theory of human descent from apes.

Ancestral Images: The Iconography of Human Origins. The first history book I ever had was a picture book. It was also my introduction to the mysterious land of human prehistory. Foreword by Clive Gamble. Published by: Cornell University Press. Unstead’sLooking at History: Britain from cavemen to the present day,first published in one volume in 1955. It was richly illustrated with over one thousand drawings and some colour plates and photographs.

In: Limina: a journal of historical and cultural studies, 1999, p. 155-6. AU - Broomhall, Susan. Limina: a journal of historical and cultural studies.

Similar books and articles. Reconstructing the Reality of Images: Byzantine Material Culture and Religious Iconography, 11th-15th Centuries. Iconography in Cultural Studies Papers From the International Conference "Iconography East and West", Szeged 1993. Raffaella Trigona - 2009 - World Futures 65 (8):605-612.

200 pages, B/w photos, Col and b/w illus. Publisher: The History Press. Images Additional images. ISBN: 9780750911788 Hardback Dec 1998 Out of Print Images Additional images. 200 pages, B/w photos, Col and b/w illus. Kenneth A. R. Kennedy. Kennedy, "Ancestral Images: The Iconography of Human Origins. Stephanie Moser," Isis 91, no. 2 (Ju. 2000): 324-326. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The History of Medicine and the Scientific Revolution. Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why?

Pictorial reconstructions of ancient human ancestors have twin purposes: to make sense of shared ancestry and to bring prehistory to life. Stephanie Moser analyzes the close relationship between representations of the past and theories about human evolution, showing how this relationship existed even before a scientific understanding of human origins developed. How did mythological, religious, and historically inspired visions of the past, in existence for centuries, shape this understanding? Moser treats images as primary documents, and her book is lavishly illustrated with engravings, paintings, photographs, and reconstructions.

In surveying the iconography of prehistory, Moser explores visions of human creation from their origins in classical, early Christian, and medieval periods through traditions of representation initiated in the Renaissance. She looks closely at the first scientific reconstructions of the nineteenth century, which dramatized and made comprehensible the Darwinian theory of human descent from apes. She considers, as well, the impact of reconstructions on popular literature in Europe and North America, showing that early visualizations of prehistory retained a firm hold on the imagination―a hold that archaeologists and anthropologists have found difficult to shake.