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Download Since Meiji: Perspectives on the Japanese Visual Arts, 1868-2000 eBook

by J. Thomas Rimer

Download Since Meiji: Perspectives on the Japanese Visual Arts, 1868-2000 eBook
ISBN:
0824835824
Author:
J. Thomas Rimer
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Hawaii Press (October 31, 2011)
Pages:
584 pages
EPUB book:
1493 kb
FB2 book:
1750 kb
DJVU:
1371 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
775


The book contains eleven sparkling essays, including those written by two leading figures of Japanese Studies we lost in 2008 and 2011.

Since Meiji addresses its unwieldy subject by committee, offering 17 essays on various aspects of Japanese cultural production from the domestication of art and its institutions in the Meiji period to the end of the millennium. The book contains eleven sparkling essays, including those written by two leading figures of Japanese Studies we lost in 2008 and 2011, respectively, cinema specialist Keiko MacDonald and theatre specialist David G. Goodman.

In recent years, however, the subject has begun to attract wide interest. As is evident from this volume, this period of roughly a century and a half produced an outpouring of art created in a bewildering number of genres and spanning a wide range of aims and accomplishments.

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Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Since Meiji : Perspectives on the Japanese Visual . concerned with the visual arts of his period, Okakura Tenshin (1862-1913), whose Book of Tea is still widely read today

concerned with the visual arts of his period, Okakura Tenshin (1862-1913), whose Book of Tea is still widely read today. Taken together, the essays in this volume allow readers to connect ideas and images, thus bringing to light larger trends in the Japanese visual arts that have made possible the vitality, range, and striking achievements created during this turbulent and lively period.

These digressions are occasionally interesting, they detract from the focus of the work and distract the reader from the point McArthur is trying to make. The book reads like a doctoral dissertation, and McArthur admits this was the book's original genesis. McArthur notes his debt to Morioka Heinz and Sasaki Miyoko in his introduction, and this book did lead me back to their excellent 1983 article on Black in Monumenta Nipponica. In many ways, Henry Black elaborates and extends Morioka and Sasaki's arguments. However, one questions the need or necessity for this work.

Title: Since Meiji Author: Rimer, J. Thomas (EDT)/ McCallum, Toshiko (TRN) Publisher: Univ of Hawaii Pr Publication Date: 2011/12/31 Number of Pages: 516 Binding Type: HARDCOVER Library of Congress: 2011026061. Язык: english, japanese. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Sincerity's shadow : self-consciousness in British romantic and y American poetry.

Published by University of Hawai'i Press (2011). ISBN 10: 0824834410 ISBN 13: 9780824834418. In recent years, however, the subject has begun to attract wide interest.

6 For example, see Mostow, Joshua . Bryson, Norman, and Graybill, Maribeth, ed. Gender and Power in the Japanese Visual Field (Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2003); Yoshimoto, Midori, Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York (New Brunswick, .

Japanese Political History since the Meiji Renovation, 1868-2000

Japanese Political History since the Meiji Renovation, 1868-2000. 395 pp. Stockwin, J. A. Dictionary of the Modern Politics of Japan. Havens, Thomas R. Valley of Darkness: The Japanese People and World War II. 1978. "Women and War in Japan, 1937–1945. A Medieval Historian's Perspective on the Imperial Army and the Japanese Warrior Tradition," The History Teacher (1994) 27:339–349, in JSTOR. Harries, M. and S. Harries. Soldiers of the Sun: The Rise and Fall of the Imperial Japanese Army (1991).

Research outside Japan on the history and significance of the Japanese visual arts since the beginning of the Meiji period (1868) has been, with the exception of writings on modern and contemporary woodblock prints, a relatively unexplored area of inquiry. In recent years, however, the subject has begun to attract wide interest. As is evident from this volume, this period of roughly a century and a half produced an outpouring of art created in a bewildering number of genres and spanning a wide range of aims and accomplishments. Since Meiji is the first sustained effort in English to discuss in any depth a time when Japan, eager to join in the larger cultural developments in Europe and the U.S., went through a visual revolution. Indeed, this study of the visual arts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries suggests a fresh history of modern Japanese culture―one that until now has not been widely visible or thoroughly analyzed outside that country.

In this extensive collection, which includes some 190 black-and-white and color reproductions, scholars from Japan, Europe, Australia, and America explore an impressive array of subjects: painting, sculpture, prints, fashion design, crafts, and gardens. The works discussed range from early Meiji attempts to create art that referenced Western styles to postwar and contemporary avant-garde experiments. There are, in addition, substantive investigations of the cultural and intellectual background that helped stimulate the creation of new and shifting art forms, including essays on the invention of a modern artistic vocabulary in the Japanese language and the history of art criticism in Japan, as well as an extensive account of the career and significance of perhaps the best-known Japanese figure concerned with the visual arts of his period, Okakura Tenshin (1862–1913), whose Book of Tea is still widely read today.

Taken together, the essays in this volume allow readers to connect ideas and images, thus bringing to light larger trends in the Japanese visual arts that have made possible the vitality, range, and striking achievements created during this turbulent and lively period.

Contributors: Stephen Addiss, Chiaki Ajioka, John Clark, Ellen Conant, Mikiko Hirayama, Michael Marra, Jonathan Reynolds, J. Thomas Rimer, Audrey Yoshiko Seo, Eric C. Shiner, Lawrence Smith, Shuji Tanaka, Reiko Tomii, Mayu Tsuruya, Toshio Watanabe, Gennifer Weisenfeld, Bert Winther-Tamaki, Emiko Yamanashi.

  • Isha
Nothing in this book is absolutely incorrect, but many ideas are framed in highly simplistic ways. This gives the reader a very watered-down impression of the events of the time. I appreciate the effort, and it was interesting to read, but every time I delved deeper into a subject from the book, I found that there was much more complexity than Since Meiji presents.

I think this book would be great for someone hoping to get a general idea about Japanese art since Meiji, but I don't recommend it as a reliable source for research.
  • Fordrelis
Great book! Thanks for a fine transaction.