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Download Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist eBook

by Caroline A. Jones

Download Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist eBook
ISBN:
0226406482
Author:
Caroline A. Jones
Category:
History & Criticism
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (January 15, 1997)
Pages:
572 pages
EPUB book:
1916 kb
FB2 book:
1933 kb
DJVU:
1831 kb
Other formats
txt lit mobi lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
883


Machine in the Studio book.

Machine in the Studio book. Taking a fresh look at the art world of the 1960s, Caroline Jones argues that far from the countercultural stance associated with the decade, the artists she examines-including Stella, Warhol, and Smithson-identified their work with postwar industry and corporate culture.

Caroline A. Jones is professor in the History, Theory, and Criticism section of the Department of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. New pick from Oprah's Book Club. The Sun Does Shine" by Anthony Ray Hinton is a powerful, revealing story of hope, love, justice, and the power of reading by a man who spent thirty years on death row for a crime he didn't commit. Jones (born 21 April 1954, Durham, North Carolina) is an. .Machine in the studio: constructing the postwar American artist (The University of Chicago Press, 1996). Jones (born 21 April 1954, Durham, North Carolina) is an American art historian, author, curator, and critic. Jones contributed an interview with artist Anicka Yi to the 2016 book Anicka Yi: 6,070,430K of Digital Spit, published in conjunction with the 2015 exhibition by the same title at the List Visual Arts Center. Jones was one of the subjects of Yi's work in her 2015 exhibition You Can Call Me F, for which one hundred women.

Taking a fresh look at the art world of the 1960s, Caroline Jones argues that far from the countercultural stance associated with the decade, the artists she examines-including Stella, Warhol, and Smithson-identified their work with postwar industry and corporate culture. Drawing on extensive interviews with artists and their assistants as well as close readings of artworks, Jones explains that much of the major work of the 1960s was compelling precisely because it was central to the visual and economic culture of its time.

Machine in the Studio : Constructing the Postwar American Artist. By (author) Caroline A. Jones. Caroline A. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

In this vigorous, ambitious book Caroline Jones describes a recent, periodizing shift in the way that people have conceived of artists' studios

In this vigorous, ambitious book Caroline Jones describes a recent, periodizing shift in the way that people have conceived of artists' studios. This shift-one that divides the 1950s from the 1960s-is the studio's change from the site of solitary, Abstract Expressionist ritual to a space increasingly defined by technological and antihumanist metaphors.

book by Caroline A.

The radical break of artists with Abstract Expressionism at the end of the 1950s demonstrates the traditional modernist view of the solitary, suffering artist did not seduce those who came of age in the burgeoning American economy of the 1960s.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Planet Dora: A Memoir of the Holocaust and the Birth of the Space Ageby Yves Béon.

Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1996.

Jones, Caroline A. Related Subjects. Art, American - 20th Century. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1996.

Taking a fresh look at the art world of the 1960s, Caroline Jones argues that far from the countercultural stance associated with the decade, the artists she examines—including Stella, Warhol, and Smithson—identified their work with postwar industry and corporate culture. Drawing on extensive interviews with artists and their assistants as well as close readings of artworks, Jones explains that much of the major work of the 1960s was compelling precisely because it was central to the visual and economic culture of its time."Jones manages to analyze art works in their historical, political, and conceptual context, giving them a thickness of description rarely possible in standard art history. . . . This is one of the best books on the period I have read so far. To paraphrase Clement Greenberg, it gives contemporary art history a good name."—Serge Guilbaut, Bookforum"Though we are some 30 years past the events of the '60s, our world is still largely responding to them, as this marvelous book amply demonstrates."—David McCarthy, New Art Examiner