almediah.fr
» » Rhythm Is Our Business: Jimmie Lunceford and the Harlem Express (Jazz Perspectives)

Download Rhythm Is Our Business: Jimmie Lunceford and the Harlem Express (Jazz Perspectives) eBook

by Eddy Determeyer

Download Rhythm Is Our Business: Jimmie Lunceford and the Harlem Express (Jazz Perspectives) eBook
ISBN:
0472115537
Author:
Eddy Determeyer
Category:
Music
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Michigan Press (November 20, 2006)
Pages:
344 pages
EPUB book:
1345 kb
FB2 book:
1960 kb
DJVU:
1346 kb
Other formats
docx mobi lrf txt
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
652


Eddy Determeyer has done a fine job in exploring Lunceford's life and times

Eddy Determeyer has done a fine job in exploring Lunceford's life and times. He puts the "Harlem Express" into context, offering many insights into the man, music and surrounding circumstances. Drawing upon previously unpublished interviews (many of which were conducted by the author) as well as 'common' sources and his own analysis, Determeyer produced a very readable book that fleshes out this amazing man and his music.

Mobile version (beta). Rhythm Is Our Business: Jimmie Lunceford and the Harlem Express (Jazz Perspectives). Download (pdf, . 4 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Rhythm Is Our Business traces the development of the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra from its infant days as a high school .

Rhythm Is Our Business traces the development of the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra from its infant days as a high school band in Memphis to its record-breaking tours across the United States, Canada, and Europe. The book also unveils Lunceford's romantic yet ill-fated involvement with Yolande Du Bois, daughter of famous writer and opinion leader . In 1984 Determeyer wrote a seven-part series on Jimmie Lunceford for the Dutch magazine Jazz Nu. Determeyer has written thousands of articles on music for a variety of Dutch publications and is the author of several books. He currently produces the Holiday for Hipsters radio show for Dutch station Concertzender.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone. This is our day. Today. To bring the best, most trustworthy information to every internet reader. I believe all of this is doable, if we pull together to create the internet as it was meant to b. .

Rhythm Is Our Business book. In the 1930s, swing music reigned, and the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra was the hottest and hippest attraction on the black dance circuits. Known for its impeccable appearance and infectious rhythms, Lunceford's group was able to out-swing and outdraw any band. For ten consecutive years, they were the best-loved attraction at Harlem's famed Apollo Theater. The group's hit re In the 1930s, swing music reigned, and the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra was the hottest and hippest attraction on the black dance circuits.

Rhythm is our business. Jimmie Lunceford and the Harlem Express. The University of Michigan Press Ann Arbor. Rhythm is our business : Jimmie Lunceford and the Harlem Express /. Eddy Determeyer. p. cm. - (Jazz perspectives).

Jazz Heritage Series Jimmie Lunceford 1: Rhythm Is Our Business (1934-1935) (LP: Decca . Rhythm Is Our Business : Jimmie Lunceford and the Harlem Express. Eddy Determeyer Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2006.

Jazz Heritage Series Jimmie Lunceford 1: Rhythm Is Our Business (1934-1935) (LP: Decca 1968/LP reissue: MCA 1980). Jazz Heritage Series Jimmie Lunceford 2: Harlem Shout (1935-1936) (LP: Decca 1968/LP reissue: MCA 1980). Jazz Heritage Series Jimmie Lunceford 3: For Dancers Only (1936-1937) (LP: Decca 1968/LP reissue: MCA 1980). 0472115537 (cloth : alk. paper) pages 1,2.

EDDY DETERMEYER The book also unveils Lunceford's romantic yet ill-fated involvement with Yolande Du Bois.

Published by: University of Michigan Press. Rhythm Is Our Businesstraces the development of the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra from its infant days as a high school band in Memphis to its record-breaking tours across the United States, Canada, and Europe. And by reconstructing Lunceford's last day, the book offers a glimpse into the mysteries surrounding the leader's untimely death.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free.

"The first detailed study of one of the swing era's most important bands and the first biography of its leader, Jimmie Lunceford. This is a most welcome and significant contribution to the literature of jazz, to our understanding of a vital period in jazz history, and to the music of an outstanding and unique ensemble that was emblematic of the swing era."---Dan Morgenstern, Director, Institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University, and author of Living with Jazz

"We were more popular than Benny Goodman! We were the first black band that played the Paramount Theater, downtown New York. Not Duke Ellington, not Count Basie. Six weeks in a row, four or five shows daily, and it was packed every day, people lining up around the corner constantly! We could outdraw any band in the country."---Gerald Wilson

"Jimmie Lunceford was a key swing-era figure, and no book covers his biography and music like this one does. Grounded in years of research and inspired by the writer's love of his subject, the book fills a critical gap in the jazz literature and will be essential reading for all swing aficionados."---Jeffrey Magee, Associate Professor of Musicology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and author of The Uncrowned King of Swing: Fletcher Henderson and Big Band Jazz

"It was Jimmie Lunceford and his orchestra that inspired me to become a musician. I was eleven years old at the time. When I heard that band play I said to myself, 'That's for me. I want to become a musician.' I still get inspired when I listen to some of their recordings. The Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra is one of the great jazz orchestras of all time."---Horace Silver

"Jimmie Lunceford has the best of all bands. Duke is great, Basie is remarkable, but Lunceford tops them both."---Glenn Miller

In the 1930s, swing music reigned, and the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra was the hottest and hippest attraction on the black dance circuits. Known for its impeccable appearance and infectious rhythms, Lunceford's group was able to out-swing and outdraw any band. For ten consecutive years, they were the best-loved attraction at Harlem's famed Apollo Theater. The group's hit recordings sold in the hundreds of thousands, and Jimmie Lunceford's band rivaled Ellington's for popularity in the African American community.

Jimmie Lunceford was also an innovator, elevating big-band showmanship to an art and introducing such novel instruments as the electric guitar and bass. The band's arrangements, written by Sy Oliver, Edwin Wilcox, Gerald Wilson, Billy Moore, Jr., and Tadd Dameron, were daring and forward looking, influencing generations of big-band writers.

Rhythm Is Our Business traces the development of the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra from its infant days as a high school band in Memphis to its record-breaking tours across the United States, Canada, and Europe. The book also unveils Lunceford's romantic yet ill-fated involvement with Yolande Du Bois, daughter of famous writer and opinion leader W.E.B. Du Bois. And by reconstructing Lunceford's last day, the book offers a glimpse into the mysteries surrounding the leader's untimely death. This is essential reading for anyone interested in the history and legacy of swing.

Eddy Determeyer has been a freelance music journalist for more than three decades. In 1984 Determeyer wrote a seven-part series on Jimmie Lunceford for the Dutch magazine Jazz Nu. Determeyer has written thousands of articles on music for a variety of Dutch publications and is the author of several books. He currently produces the Holiday for Hipsters radio show for Dutch station Concertzender.

Cover image: Lunceford brass section, ca. late 1936. Left to right: Paul Webster, Eddie Durham, Sy Oliver, Elmer Crumbley, Eddie Tompkins, Russell Bowles. (Bertil Lyttkens Collection)

  • blac wolf
This book relies too much on newspaper clippings that were little more than slightly revamped press releases. The author chose to emphasize the most sensational rumors about Lunceford's death, ones that were not substantiated by either the coroner's autopsy nor the recollections of some of the band's sidemen, including the two who took over the band following their leader's untimely demise. Lunceford's music and legacy are impressive enough without adding extra hyperbole. Lunceford was not the first black bandleader to hire white musicians, for example.
  • Fordg
For more than a decade, from the mid-1930s until the late 1940s, Jimmie Lunceford's Orchestra (aka: the Harlem Express) was acknowledged as one of the leading jazz bands of the swing era. The group was famous for its rhythmic precision and "bounce," its rich sonority, its discipline and its impeccable showmanship. Musically, the Harlem Express did it all: toured the USA and Sweden, played radio gigs, clubs and dances, cut dozens of hit records. . . . Socially and politically, the Harlem Express dismantled racial barriers; Lunceford was one of the first black bandleaders to hire white musicians and composers, and his group played for black, white and desegregated audiences without discrimination. Jimmie Lunceford's band was highly regarded by musicians, critics and audiences, all of whom were stunned when Lunceford died of an apparent heart attack at the age of 45. As a tribute to their leader, the band tried to stay together, but the effort was short-lived; the group just wasn't the same without the leader who had molded and guided them for so long. When Lunceford died, the heart and soul of the Harlem Express died with him.

Rhythm is Our Business is Eddy Determeyer's painstakingly researched chronicle of the rise, peak and collapse of Lunceford's orchestra. Determeyer gathered his material from nearly five dozen interviews, and more than four dozen journals, newspapers and books. In addition to the endnotes and bibliography, Determeyer includes an extensive discography of the Harlem Express's recordings.

Determeyer traces Lunceford's early years in Oklahoma City and Denver and his college years at Fisk University. He recounts Lunceford's brief career as a high school music teacher in Memphis and describes how Lunceford and his students transformed themselves from a local sensation to a top-notch band based in New York City. Determeyer reveals the financial and personal tensions that arose within the group and discusses the personnel changes that gradually altered the band's character and style. He offers intimate details about cooperation and competition between the New York jazz bands, and about the struggles between the musicians' union, radio stations and recording companies. Perhaps most intriguingly, Determeyer reconstructs the details of Lunceford's last day and puts forward his theory regarding the leader's untimely demise.

Readers interested in the histories of the Harlem Express and the mid-twentieth century jazz scene (particularly in New York City) will find this book highly satisfying. Those who want to learn about Jimmie Lunceford himself will such information sparse. This lack of detail is not Determeyer's fault. Lunceford was an intensely private man who was barely known by anyone, including those who lived and worked with him for nearly twenty years. Determeyer probably has uncovered just about anything that ever will be known about Jimmie Lunceford, the quiet, clean-cut, clean-living man who loved music, sports and aviation and had once loved W.E.B Dubois's daughter. Aside from those few personal details, the story of the Harlem Express is also, for the most part, the story of Jimmie Lunceford. Rhythm Is Our Business is a well researched, finely written book. Readers interested in jazz history will certainly want to add this volume to their collections.
  • Foginn
Well written, great music (really) and from what was said a great entertainer along with his band. sad ending though.
  • Mightdragon
Although regarded as one of the greatest swing bands, Lunceford's orch somehow slipped through the cracks between the 40s and today. Lunceford's early death in 1947 age 45 years effectively ended the band - and his music is too often forgotten or relegated to a back seat when the swing era is assesed.

Eddy Determeyer has done a fine job in exploring Lunceford's life and times. He puts the "Harlem Express" into context, offering many insights into the man, music and surrounding circumstances. Drawing upon previously unpublished interviews (many of which were conducted by the author) as well as 'common' sources and his own analysis, Determeyer produced a very readable book that fleshes out this amazing man and his music. Highly recommended.