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Download Perspectives on Korean Music: Volume 2: Creating Korean Music: Tradition, Innovation and the Discourse of Identity (SOAS Musicology Series) (v. 2) eBook

by Keith Howard

Download Perspectives on Korean Music: Volume 2: Creating Korean Music: Tradition, Innovation and the Discourse of Identity (SOAS Musicology Series) (v. 2) eBook
ISBN:
0754657299
Author:
Keith Howard
Category:
Music
Language:
English
Publisher:
Routledge (October 28, 2006)
Pages:
260 pages
EPUB book:
1928 kb
FB2 book:
1722 kb
DJVU:
1828 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
538


Korean Music Volume 2 book.

Korean Music Volume 2 book. The volume opens with SamulNori, a percussion quartet known throughout the world that was formed in 1978 but is rooted in local and itinerant bands stretching back many centuries.

This volume asks what Koreans consider makes music Korean, and how meaning is ascribed to musical . With the rise of nationalism in the Republic of Korea, music has come to play a central role in the discourse of identity.

This volume asks what Koreans consider makes music Korean, and how meaning is ascribed to musical creation. This volume asks what Koreans consider makes music Korean, and how meaning is ascribed to musical creation. Keith Howard explores specific aspects of creativity that are designed to appeal to a new audience that is increasingly westernized yet proud of its indigenous heritage - updates of tradition, compositions, and collaborative fusions.

ISBN 0 8. Keith Howard: Creating Korean Music: Tradition, Innovation and the Discourse of Identity. Perspectives on Korean Music Volume 2. (SOAS Musicology Series. xviii, 242 pp. Aldershot and Burlington: Ashgate, 2006.

Korean Music: Intangible Cultural Properties as Icons of Identity.

Perspectives on Korean Music: Volume 1: Preserving Korean Music: Intangible Cultural Properties as Icons of Identity. In this volume, Keith Howard provides the first comprehensive analysis in English of the system. He documents court music and dance, Confucian and shaman ritual music, folksongs, the professional folk-art genres of p'ansori ('epic storytelling through song') and sanjo ('scattered melodies'), and more, as well as instrument making, food preparation and liquor distilling - a good performance, after all, requires wine to flow.

His writings on Korean music have appeared in such journals as Ethnomusicology, Asian Music, and Korean Studies, and he also wrote the notes to Hwang Byungki's most recent CD at the composer's request. Series: SOAS Musicology Series. Hardcover: 256 pages.

This volume asks what Koreans consider makes music Korean, and how . Western music increasingly encroached on the market for Korean music and doubts were raised about the future of any music identifiably Korean.

Series: Perspectives on Korean music (vol. 2), SOAS Musicology Series. SOAS Musicology Series. Original publication date.

New musicology is a wide body of musicology since the 1980s with a focus upon the cultural study, aesthetics, criticism, and hermeneutics of music.

Created December 10, 2009. Download catalog record: RDF, JSON.

Are you sure you want to remove Korean Music Volume 2: Creating Korean Music: Tradition, Innovation And the Discourse of Identity (Soas Musicology) (Soas Musicology) (Soas Musicology Series: Perspectives on Korean Music) from your list? Excerpts. Created December 10, 2009.

Professor Keith Howard is Professor of Music and member of the Centre for Korean Studies at SOAS .

Professor Keith Howard is Professor of Music and member of the Centre for Korean Studies at SOAS, University of London. He was formerly Professor and Associate Dean at the University of Sydney, and has held visiting professorships at Monash University, Ewha Women’s University and Hanguk University of Foreign Studies. 2007), Creating Korean Music: Composition and the Discourse of National Identity (2006), Preserving Korean Music: Intangible Cultural Properties as Icons of Identity (2006), and Korean Pop Music: Riding the Wave (2006).

With the rise of nationalism in the Republic of Korea, music has come to play a central role in the discourse of identity. This volume asks what Koreans consider makes music Korean, and how meaning is ascribed to musical creation. Keith Howard explores specific aspects of creativity that are designed to appeal to a new audience that is increasingly westernized yet proud of its indigenous heritage - updates of tradition, compositions, and collaborative fusions. He charts the development of the Korean music scene over the last 25 years and interprets the debates, claims and statistics by incorporating the voices of musicians, composers, scholars and critics. Koreanness is a brand identity with a discourse founded on heritage, hence Howard focuses on music that is claimed to link to tradition, and on music compositions where indigenous identity is consciously incorporated. The volume opens with SamulNori, a percussion quartet known throughout the world that was formed in 1978 but is rooted in local and itinerant bands stretching back many centuries. Parallel developments in vocal genres, folksongs and p'ansori ('epic storytelling through song') are considered, then three chapters explore compositions written both for western instruments and for Korean instruments, and designed both for Korean and international audiences. Over time, Howard shows how the two musical worlds - kugak, traditional music, and yangak, western music - have collided, and how fusions have emerged. This volume documents how identity has been negotiated by musicians, composers and audiences. Until recently, references to tradition were common and, by critics and musicologists, required. Western music increasingly encroached on the market for Korean music and doubts were raised about the future of any music identifiably Korean. Today, Korean musical production exudes a resurgent confidence as it amalgamates Korean and western elements, as it arranges and incorporates the old in the new, and as it creates a music suitable for the contemporary world.