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Download Mimomania: Music and Gesture in Nineteenth-Century Opera (California Studies in 19th-Century Music) eBook

by Mary Ann Smart

Download Mimomania: Music and Gesture in Nineteenth-Century Opera (California Studies in 19th-Century Music) eBook
ISBN:
0520248317
Author:
Mary Ann Smart
Category:
Music
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of California Press; First edition (March 10, 2004)
Pages:
254 pages
EPUB book:
1225 kb
FB2 book:
1582 kb
DJVU:
1220 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
386


Mimomania: Music and Gesture in Nineteenth-Century Opera (California Studies in 19th Century Music).

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Mary Ann Smart suspects that Nietzsche may have seen and heard more than he realized. In Mimomania she takes his accusation as an invitation to listen to Wagner's music-and that of several of his for the way it serves to intensify the visible and the enacted.

Электронная книга "Mimomania: Music and Gesture in Nineteenth-Century Opera", Mary Ann Smart. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Mimomania: Music and Gesture in Nineteenth-Century Opera" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Mary Ann Smart suspects that Nietzsche may have seen and heard more than he realized

Series: California Studies in 19th-Century Music. Mary Ann Smart suspects that Nietzsche may have seen and heard more than he realized

Series: California Studies in 19th-Century Music. Mary Ann Smart suspects that Nietzsche may have seen and heard more than he realized. As Smart demonstrates, this productive fusion of music and movement often arises when music forsakes the autonomy so prized by the Romantics to function mimetically, underlining the sighs of a Bellini heroine, for instance, or the authoritarian footsteps of a Verdi baritone. Mimomaniatracks such effects through readings of operas by Auber, Bellini, Meyerbeer, Verdi, and Wagner. California Studies in 19th-Century Music. University of California Press.

When Nietzsche dubbed Richard Wagner "the most enthusiastic mimomaniac" ever to exist, he was objecting to a hollowness he felt in the music, a crowding out of any true dramatic impulse by extravagant poses and constant nervous movements.

An outstanding contribution to the study of nineteenth-century opera. Its focus on the relationship between music and gesture provides a new perspective that yields a dazzling array of exciting insights. Not only musicologists, but also cultural historians, theatre historians, feminist theorists and anybody interested in the study of performance will benefit from reading this book.

9 Gilbert's Chironomia, or a Treatise on Rhetorical Delivery, published in 1806, was an important source for the study of oration and gesture until the late nineteenth century

9 Gilbert's Chironomia, or a Treatise on Rhetorical Delivery, published in 1806, was an important source for the study of oration and gesture until the late nineteenth century. Rochas's Les Sentiments, la musique et le geste was published in 1900; although it dates nearly 20 years beyond the last opera in Smart's book, it includes information from earlier sources. 10 This rigid movement was one of the features of a 2005 production of La sonnambula, directed by Federico Tiezzi, in which the choreography of the chorus synchronized every gesture and step with the music.

When Nietzsche dubbed Richard Wagner "the most enthusiastic mimomaniac" ever to exist, he was objecting to a hollowness he felt in the music, a crowding out of any true dramatic impulse by extravagant poses and constant nervous movements. Mary Ann Smart suspects that Nietzsche may have seen and heard more than he realized. In Mimomania she takes his accusation as an invitation to listen to Wagner's music―and that of several of his near-contemporaries―for the way it serves to intensify the visible and the enacted. As Smart demonstrates, this productive fusion of music and movement often arises when music forsakes the autonomy so prized by the Romantics to function mimetically, underlining the sighs of a Bellini heroine, for instance, or the authoritarian footsteps of a Verdi baritone. Mimomania tracks such effects through readings of operas by Auber, Bellini, Meyerbeer, Verdi, and Wagner.Listening for gestural music, we find resemblance in unexpected places: between the overwrought scenes of supplication in French melodrama of the 1820s and a cluster of late Verdi arias that end with the soprano falling to her knees, or between the mute heroine of Auber’s La Muette de Portici and the solemn, almost theological pantomimic tableaux Wagner builds around characters such as Sieglinde or Kundry. Mimomania shows how attention to gesture suggests a new approach to the representation of gender in this repertoire, replacing aural analogies for voyeurism and objectification with a more specifically musical sense of how music can surround, propel, and animate the body on stage.