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Download Different Drummers: Jazz in the Culture of Nazi Germany eBook

by Michael H. Kater

Download Different Drummers: Jazz in the Culture of Nazi Germany eBook
ISBN:
0195165535
Author:
Michael H. Kater
Category:
Music
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 13, 2003)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1536 kb
FB2 book:
1152 kb
DJVU:
1175 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
918


Michael Kater's remarkable book paints a very different picture and deals in great detail with a little-known chapter in jazz history. There is not a jazz fan, no matter how knowledgeable, who will fail to learn a great deal by reading this important book. -Scott Yanow, Jazziz.

Michael Kater's remarkable book paints a very different picture and deals in great detail with a little-known chapter in jazz history. -The Los Angeles Times.

In Different Drummers, Michael Kater-a distinguished historian and himself a jazz musician-explores the underground history of jazz in Hitler's Germany

In Different Drummers, Michael Kater-a distinguished historian and himself a jazz musician-explores the underground history of jazz in Hitler's Germany. He offers a frightening and fascinating look at life and popular culture during the Third Reich, showing that for the Nazis, jazz was an especially threatening form of expression

Электронная книга "Different Drummers: Jazz in the Culture of Nazi Germany", Michael H. Kater.

Электронная книга "Different Drummers: Jazz in the Culture of Nazi Germany", Michael H. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Different Drummers: Jazz in the Culture of Nazi Germany" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

It offers a frightening and fascinating look at life and popular culture during the Third Reich, showing that for the Nazis, jazz was an especially threatening form of expression. The book looks at groups such as the Weintraub Syncopators, Germany's best indigenous jazz band; the Harlem Club of Frankfurt, whose male members wore their hair long in defiance of Nazi conventions; and the Hamburg Swings - the most daring radicals of all - who openly challenged the Gestapo with a series of mass dance rallies.

Michael Hans Kater (born 1937) is a German historian of Nazism. Doctors Under Hitler (1989). Different Drummers: Jazz in the Culture of Nazi Germany (1992). Culture in Nazi Germany. ISBN 9780300211412 (Yale University Press, 2019). "F0456 : Michael H. Kater fonds". Retrieved 26 October 2018. "CCEAE - Michael H. Kater". "Kater, Michael H(ans) 1937-".

More by Michael H. The Nazi Party: A social profile of members and leaders, 1919-1945. Doctors Under Hitler.

book by Michael H. When the African-American dancer Josephine Baker visited Berlin in 1925, she found it dazzling. More by Michael H.

Book, Online - Google Books. Kater, Michael . 1937-. Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video.

10 Jazz in the Postwar Era In the postwar period, older forms of jazz continued to be popular. 50 This is demonstrated in Grass’s autobiography, where during the years immediately following the war, he tells of frequenting jazz dance clubs and forming a jazz trio inspired by Dixieland and Blues. For some Germans, negative attitudes from the Weimar Republic persisted and American popular culture still appeared as emasculating, self-destructive, hypersexual and consumer driven. Around 1945/46 jazz hot clubs, like the one frequented by Grass and his protagonist Oskar in Die Blechtrommel, were created by fans.

This book explores the underground history of jazz in Adolf Hitler's Germany. Michael H. Kater, author York University, Toronto Author Webpage. It offers a frightening and fascinating look at life and popular culture during the Third Reich, showing that for the Nazis, jazz was an especially threatening form of expression. Not only were its creators at the very bottom of the Nazi racial hierarchy, but the very essence of jazz - spontaneity, improvisation, and, above all, individuality - represented a direct challenge to the repetitive, simple, uniform pulse of German march music and indeed everyday life.

ENG. Number of Pages.

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When the African-American dancer Josephine Baker visited Berlin in 1925, she found it dazzling. "The city had a jewel-like sparkle," she said, "the vast cafés reminded me of ocean liners powered by the rhythms of their orchestras. There was music everywhere." Eager to look ahead after the crushing defeat of World War I, Weimar Germany embraced the modernism that swept through Europe and was crazy over jazz. But with the rise of National Socialism came censorship and proscription: an art form born on foreign soil and presided over by Negroes and Jews could have no place in the culture of a "master race." In Different Drummers, Michael Kater--a distinguished historian and himself a jazz musician--explores the underground history of jazz in Hitler's Germany. He offers a frightening and fascinating look at life and popular culture during the Third Reich, showing that for the Nazis, jazz was an especially threatening form of expression. Not only were its creators at the very bottom of the Nazi racial hierarchy, but the very essence of jazz--spontaneity, improvisation, and, above all, individuality--represented a direct challenge to the repetitive, simple, uniform pulse of German march music and indeed everyday life. The fact that many of the most talented European jazz artists were Jewish only made the music more objectionable. In tracing the growth of what would become a bold and eloquent form of social protest, Kater mines a trove of previously untapped archival records and assembles interviews with surviving witnesses as he brings to life a little-known aspect of wartime Germany. He introduces us to groups such as the Weintraub Syncopators, Germany's best indigenous jazz band; the Harlem Club of Frankfurt, whose male members wore their hair long in defiance of Nazi conventions; and the Hamburg Swings--the most daring radicals of all--who openly challenged the Gestapo with a series of mass dance rallies. More than once these demonstrations turned violent, with the Swings and the Hitler Youth fighting it out in the streets. In the end we come to realize that jazz not only survived persecution, but became a powerful symbol of political disobedience--and even resistance--in wartime Germany. And as we witness the vacillations of the Nazi regime (while they worked toward its ultimate extinction, they used jazz for their own propaganda purposes), we see that the myth of Nazi social control was, to a large degree, just that--Hitler's dictatorship never became as pure and effective a form of totalitarianism as we are sometimes led to believe. With its vivid portraits of all the key figures, Different Drummers provides a unique glimpse of a counter-culture virtually unexamined until now. It is a provocative account that reminds us that, even in the face of the most unspeakable oppression, the human spirit endures.
  • Gaiauaco
MUCH OF THE INFO IS NEW TO ME, AND THOUGH I MISSED
THIS WHEN FIRST PUBLISHED I'M GLAD TO HAVE IT NOW ONLY
ONE QUIBBLE. A FEW PAGES OF RECENT RE-ISSUES ON CD OF
THE PERFORMERS AND BANDS MENTIONED WOULD BE A DISTINCT
ASSET.
  • Zonama
If you like reading about the history of jazz and all that went on throughout the world, this book is a must read.
  • Burgas
Johnny One Note Kater keeps on going with new books on his single theme. I suggest checking [...] or the various CDs Tanzdielen und Vergnuegungspalaeste...seems the Germans enjoyed swing and jazz unrestricted throughout the war, big bands and small played swing and jazz in every big city, including Paris during German occupation and including to/for the German military, and that form of pop music was routinely broadcast (and new recordings made) especially for the troops almost throughout the war. Swing dancing was eventually abandoned as a gesture of respect to the dead and wounded on the Ostfront, and nightclubs and their bands kept having to move or shut down due to the bombings. Also, it seems that the 'Verboten
by the evilNazis' line was just a post-war invention of a British record company, with a good stock of German pre-war and wartime jazz and swing records, as a marketing gimmick--oooh, forbidden underground jazz, buy it now.
  • Anardred
Not nearly as informative as Kater's "The Twisted Muse" (on classical artists affected by Third Reich policies), this is partly an examination of the schizophrenic Nazi policies regarding jazz, mostly detailed information on individual jazz artists/aficionados and their travails. It is, however, impressively footnoted.
  • terostr
I became a fan of Kater's work
  • Kupidon
A distinguished, prolific historian and accomplished jazz musician, Michael H. Kater teaches history at York University in Toronto. He has written several well-received books; prior to Different Drummers, I knew him primarily from his excellent, 1975 study of the role of right-wing student fraternities at German universities during the rise of Nazism, Studentschaft und Rechtsradikalismus in Deutschland 1918-1933 (Hamburg: Hoffmann und Campe).
Different Drummers chronicles the futile but vicious attempts of the Nazis to stamp out an art form identified with Negroes and Jews, the exquisite form of political resistance jazz represented, and its vague anticipation of the oppositional youth and student culture of 1960s West Germany.