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Download Night Beat: Shadow History of Rock and Roll eBook

by Mikal Gilmore

Download Night Beat: Shadow History of Rock and Roll eBook
ISBN:
0330368915
Author:
Mikal Gilmore
Category:
Music
Language:
English
Publisher:
Picador; New Ed edition (1999)
Pages:
480 pages
EPUB book:
1955 kb
FB2 book:
1348 kb
DJVU:
1726 kb
Other formats
lrf docx azw lit
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
474


In 1999, Gilmore's chronology Night Beat: A Shadow History of Rock and Roll was published by Anchor.

Few journalists have staked a territory as definitively and passionately. In 1999, Gilmore's chronology Night Beat: A Shadow History of Rock and Roll was published by Anchor. In July 2009 Gilmore released another book, Stories Done: Writings on the 1960s and its Discontents. It was published by Free Press. Books by Mikal Gilmore.

Night Beat is a look at the disruption of culture as viewed through the history of rock music, its activists, its politics, the .

Night Beat is a look at the disruption of culture as viewed through the history of rock music, its activists, its politics, the lives lived and lives grieved for during an epoch of upheaval. The author’s personal touchstones (Bob Dlan, John Lydon, Lou Reed and others) are mixed with his interviews and encounters as a Rolling Stone journalist (such as The Clash, Sinéad O’Connor, Miles Davis and Keith Jarrett) and a sampling of critical indulgences. This book is a mix of the best of Mikal Gilmore’s writing and new and re-fashioned pieces which together tell the story of the people who made rock.

In Night Beat he returns, with some evident relief, to the comparatively safe haven of his day job. Gilmore has been writer on rock music since Bob Dylan's first "comeback" tour in 1974. As a staffer on Rolling Stone for more than 20 years he has seen it all, heard it all and met most of them

Mikal Gilmore has covered and criticized rock & roll, its culture, and related issues for many national publications. His first book, Shot in the Heart, won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Mikal Gilmore has covered and criticized rock & roll, its culture, and related issues for many national publications. Weekly and the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, and for twenty years has worked on the staff of Rolling Stone, where he has profiled many national figures. He lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Gilmore was born to Frank and Bessie Gilmore. Night Beat: A Shadow History of Rock and Roll. Retrieved February 9, 2015. His brother Gary Gilmore (December 4, 1940 – January 17, 1977) was an American criminal who gained international attention for demanding the implementation of his death sentence for two murders he committed in Utah. Gilmore, Mikal (July 2009).

Few journalists have staked a territory as definitively and passionately as Mikal Gilmore in his twenty-year career writing about rock and roll. Beginning with Elvis and the birth of rock and roll, Gilmore traces the seismic changes in America as its youth responded to the postwar economic and political climate.

Night Beat: A Shadow History of Rock & Roll. Night Beat - Mikal Gilmore. He hears in the lyrics of Bob Dylan and Jim Morrison the voices of unrest and fervor, and charts the rise and fall of punk in brilliant essays on Lou Reed, The Sex Pistols, and The Clash. Mikal Gilmore describes Bruce Springsteen's America and the problem of Michael Jackson.

A Shadow History of Rock & Roll. Few journalists have staked a territory as definitively and passionately as Mikal Gilmore in his twenty-year career writing about rock and roll.

2 people like this topic.

  • Nern
Perhaps some day I'll have a review to post when Mikal gets it back to me signed so that I can read it. : )
  • Vichredag
Was sorry it took me 16 years to discover this book, but it's a great read for fans of rock and roll. You may discover some artists you've forgotten or even never heard before. Highly recommended.
  • Wetiwavas
Night Beat promises more than it delivers. I've read better R & R books, i.e. Heroes and Villains by Hajdu. Gilmore's other book Stories Done: Writings on the 60s was much more interesting.
  • Eng.Men
Mikal Gilmore is, simply, a marvelous writer. I have followed his work since his first piece came out in Rolling Stone in 1976, and now-a-days I only pick up the magazine when I see his name in the table of contents -- not nearly often enough. I bought NIGHT BEAT the first day it was available, and read it straight through over the next two days. I expected a lot from Gilmore -- and I wasn't disappointed. One of the things I love about his style is that he shows a gentle respect for all of his subjects, even those who are clearly buttheads. He doesn't presume to "know it all", and, even after thirty-some years, he is as compassionate for Kurt Cobain and Tupac Shakur as he was for Elvis Presley and Jim Morrison. At the same time, Gilmore has his dark side -- his is not a series of "don't worry, be happy" rock writing. Neither is this a bunch of semi-nostalgic profiles from rock and roll's archaic past; each piece breathes new life into how American culture got from there to here. Gilmore's skill in word-shaping presents indelible portraits of rock's illuminati, including Bob Dylan, Jerry Garcia, Lou Reed, Ella Fitzgerald, Randy Newman, Sinead O'Connor and -- yes! -- Frank Sinatra and Michael Jackson. The highest praise I can think of for a book like this is that even people with no specific interest in rock and roll would enjoy reading NIGHT BEAT as a well-written and fascinating historical chronicle. Gilmore writes, "I've tried to put it all thgether in an orderly way that might make for a story arc of sorts." It does. Mikal, thanks for the memories.
  • Risky Strong Dromedary
I don't buy or listen to much popular music anymore. (Just so you know, my favorite bands between ages 12 and 25 were, in chronological order, the Beatles, Creedence, Deep Purple, Yes, and Gentle Giant, although I had everything from Led Zep and Pavlov's Dog to the Carpenters and the Banana Splits in my collection. Now I listen to Oregon, Bobby McFerrin, Tingstad & Rumbel, the Bobs, Bartok, Stravinsky and Bach.) But I still love to read rock criticism. Gilmore strikes me as one of the best.
This is a collection, smoothed out and updated, of his writings from roughly two decades of work for Rolling Stone magazine and various other publications. Gilmore's judgments seem quite fair, and never dismissively exclusive for effect the way many lesser critics can be, and his prose doesn't wave its hands in the air a lot to distract you, which tends to happen with the late Lester Bangs, or Greil Marcus. (Don't get me wrong, I enjoy them both!)
I admired his heartfelt weighing of the career of Michael Jackson, who is so easy to hate. Perhaps the loveliest surprises were his extended pieces on people the young folks of our era won't know as well and won't be able gain access to via recordings -- Timothy Leary and Allen Ginsberg and his crowd.
If I have any complaint it is that Gilmore succumbs to a verbal flourish at the conclusion of too many of these pieces on the order of "we will not likely hear this again" or "better than anyone ever will," which may be true in every case, but somewhat gratuitous and ultimately unknowable. (I also remain skeptical that "irrestrainable" -- page 144 -- is actually a word.)
  • Dog_Uoll
Mikal Gilmore is the finest critical voice in popular music writing today, as immediate as the great Dave Marsh or Greil Marcus, but without the former's bluster or the latter's almost serial tendencies toward stretching historical comparison. Throughout his 25 year career, Gilmore's greatest gift has been his ability to find and document the seedier underpinnings of the musician's craft, a keen night vision which has owed as much to a violent upbringing (chronicled in his excellent memoir Shot in the Heart) as to a proclivity toward music whose makers and listeners exist on the fringe of economic and political power. Night Beat is a compendium of those documents, a "greatest hits" of Gilmore's published work, some of which the author reconsidered, restructured, and rewrote specifically for this volume. This "shadow history" tells the stories of acknowledged icons (Elvis, the Beatles, Dylan), iconoclasts (David Baerwald, Sinead O'Connor, Tupac Shakur), and peripheral figures (Allen Ginsberg, Timothy Leary) in a way which casts each as a seam in the fabric of the music as a whole, bearing the implication that without any one figure, rock's patterns and product would not be the same. Cultural ties are also implicit; the voices Gilmore records often speak for others who cannot - a bond between listener and artist which sustains each through difficult circumstances. Nowhere in Night Beat is this more evident than in the extended essay "Bruce Springsteen's America," which chronicles the evolution of Springsteen's music and audience through the Reagan/Bush years. Gilmore sees the edgier motifs in Springsteen's 1980s work as a negative response to the knee-jerk patriotism of the time, and not (as it was widely felt then) an embrace of it. Such sloganeering put a glossy sheen on exclusionary economic policy and a general mean-spiritedness toward the working class and the poor, whose stories were at the heart of Springsteen's songs. The music was so misunderstood, Gilmore suggests, because it was so co-opted by the forces it was meant to rail against. Reagan's willful tactics to confuse message and meaning rendered "Born in the USA" as simply another "Morning in America" - a feel-good slogan, regardless of the bitter, brutal realities beneath it. Realities which still exist today, regardless of the balance of power. "These are pitiless times," Gilmore writes, times reflected in the chaotic street stories of Shakur and the angst-ridden anthems of Kurt Cobain. That both Shakur and Cobain are gone belies the perilous nature of shadows, the danger of the truths hiding in them. If Night Beat contains a caution, it is that our finest artists and their work offer a reflection of our own tendencies and times - their stories are our own, and good care must be taken.