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by Eric Frederick Jensen

Download Schumann (Master Musicians Series) eBook
ISBN:
0195135660
Author:
Eric Frederick Jensen
Category:
Music
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1st edition (June 14, 2001)
Pages:
408 pages
EPUB book:
1530 kb
FB2 book:
1444 kb
DJVU:
1335 kb
Other formats
txt azw lrf mbr
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
910


Schumann (Master Musicians Series) Paperback – February 13, 2012. Eric Frederick Jensen taught at Denison University and the University of Illinois.

Schumann (Master Musicians Series) Paperback – February 13, 2012. by. Eric Frederick Jensen (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. He has published widely on 19th- and early 20th-century music, including in The Journal of Musicology, The Musical Quarterly, The Musical Times, and Music & Letters. His book, Walls of Circumstance, examined the work of eleven little known 19th-century composers. Series: Master Musicians Series.

Schumann (Master Musicians Series). 0195182979 (ISBN13: 9780195182972). Master Musicians Series.

Eric Frederick Jensen. Oxford University Press, 13 февр. Schumann Master Musicians Series. Eric Frederick Jensen

Eric Frederick Jensen. Eric Frederick Jensen.

Schumann Eric Frederick Jensen. Schiitz Basil Smallman Richard Strauss Michael Kennedy Stravinsky Paul Griffiths. SCHUMANN Eric Frederick. Oxford university press. Handel Donald Burrows. Series designed by Carla Bolte.

Chronicling the forbidden romance of Robert and Clara, Jensen offers a nuanced look at the evolution of their relationship.

Книга Schumann SchumannКниги Музыка Автор: Eric Frederick Jensen Год издания: 2001 Формат: pdf Издат. Chronicling the forbidden romance of Robert and Clara, Jensen offers a nuanced look at the evolution of their relationship.

by Eric Frederick Jensen. series Master Musicians Series.

Robert Schumann is one of the most intriguing-and enigmatic-composers of the nineteenth century. Extraordinarily gifted. by Eric Frederick Jensen. You are in the South Africa store.

Frederick Lewis Schuman (1904–1981) was an American historian, political scientist and international relations scholar

Frederick Lewis Schuman (1904–1981) was an American historian, political scientist and international relations scholar. He was a professor of history at Williams College for thirty two years after teaching at the University of Chicago, an analyst of international relations, and a social scientist, focusing on the period between World War I and World War II. Author: Eric Frederick Jensen. A significant addition to music literature, Schumann is the first authoritative biography of the composer written for general readers as well as music students and historians.

Find nearly any book by Eric Frederick Jensen. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Schumann (Master Musicians Series). ISBN 9780199737352 (978-0-19-973735-2) Softcover, Oxford University Press, 2012.

Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 15 years ago. Once you've read this book, you'll certainly understand the other e of Eric F. Jensen's "Schumann" that appears on this page.

Robert Schumann, one of the most beloved composers of the Romantic movement, embodied the passion and imaginative spirit of his age. Known for his musical and literary genius and his legendary romance with his wife Clara, Schumann was also plagued with debilitative bouts of depression that led him to live his last days in a German mental asylum. This important new biography recreates the dynamics of this man and his music with unprecedented range, offering new insight into his final years and his lasting musical achievements. Drawing on Schumann's recently published journals, letters, and new research, author Eric Jensen renders a balanced portrait of the composer with both scholarly authority and engaging clarity. Biographical chapters alternate with commentary on Schumann's piano, choral, symphonic, and operatic works, demonstrating how the circumstances of his life helped shape the music he wrote at various periods. Chronicling the forbidden romance of Robert and Clara, Jensen offers a nuanced look at the evolution of their relationship. He also follows Schuman's creative musical criticism, which championed the burgeoning careers of Chopin, Liszt, and Brahms and challenged the musical tastes of nineteenth-century Europe. Most importantly, he presents new evidence that Schumann--locked away in the asylum at Endenich--had returned sufficiently to health to justify his removal from confinement a year before his death. Like the innovations of his final compositions from 1845-1854, his sanity was overlooked and misunderstood by his contemporaries. Jensen corrects the historical record, illuminating the tragedy of Schumann's final days and refuting the common dismissal of his final works as the result of an unstable mind. A significant addition to music literature, Schumann is the first authoritative biography of the composer written for general readers as well as music students and historians.
  • Gio
Once you've read this book, you'll certainly understand the other appreciation/critique of Eric F. Jensen's "Schumann" that appears on this page. If you are fascinated by the amazing life that was Schumann's, you'll probably come away with a new perspective on his "adoring" wife Clara, the supposed priestest who presided over Schumann's musical legacy. And it won't be comforting. Jensen is too good and truthful a scholar to toss around accusations, but it's clear from the picture he paints of the last two years of Schumann's life, he had every right to feel abandoned by his wife and little aided by his well-meaning young friends Brahms and Joachim.
Jensen starts with a sobering look at the diary entries written shortly after the Schumann's married. It's not difficult to see this early on in their marriage Clara's resentment over her stalled career as virtuoso pianist.
Jensen also is clear and level-headed in his assessment of Schumann's art, praising where praise is belated due despite decades or even a century of misunderstanding by critics and audiences alike. Jensen thus includes a useful epilogue covering Schumann's successful exploration, late in his career, of the German fairy tale in music, especially its bizarre manifestation in the fantastic works of E. T. A. Hoffman and the adult fairy tales penned by the Brothers Grimm. But Jensen is equally truthful about the lack of inspiration and polish in much of Schumann's late musical productions--the ballads for chorus and orchestra, the concert overtures, the religious music, as well as the concerted music for piano and violin. However, Jensen's point is that despite crushing mental problems, Schumann managed to create successful works almost until he was committed to the insane asylum at Endenich. It seems clear from what Jensen says that Schumann was not in a state of constant mental decline in his last years. He had moments of great lucidity even at Endenich, and if Jensen is right, the composer could have left the asylum and possibly recovered.
Jensen's style may not be especially literary, but it is effective in a quiet, self-effacing way. Still, given the nature of his subject, I missed the soaring prose of John Devario's great recent biography of the composer. On the other hand, I wouldn't want to be without Jensen either. His scholarship is impeccable and his insights revelatory. Just don't come away hating Clara too much!
  • MisTereO
Jensen's biography of Schumann is a merely adequate portrayal of this most extraordinary composer. The prose is incredibly flat and repetitive--the "insight" that Schumann loved children--hardly original considering the "Kinderszenen" and "Album fur die Jugend"--is made several times, though any further elucidation is avoided. Another glaring failure of the book is the lack of musical analysis. After spending far too much time on the youthful "Papillons," Jensen practically ignores such ground-breaking works as the "Gesange der Fruhe" and the eerily gorgeous "Geistervariationen." Often, such works receive only a curious aside, such as "dense texture" and the like. Altogether an unsatisfying read.
  • Feri
I came to this book without any prior knowledge of Robert Schumann or any formal training in music, so I had no idea what to expect either from the subject or the author's assumptions about his reader. I was pleasantly surprised and enjoyed this book very much.

The book is organized with music-specific chapters self-contained with details of Schumann's compositions. These chapters can be skipped if you wish to maintain the chronological narrative of Robert and Clara Schumann's fascinating career paths and life together.

This is a story of artistic passion, tenacious pursuit of excellence, devoted love and friendship, and a fatal, tragic turn of events. The book does not end on a tragic note, however, but with Schumann's strong desire to bring the beauty of music to children, his sensitive and loving devotion for his own children, and his overarching passion to make the world a better place through his art.

The writing is lively and the author is a skilled story teller. I look forward to future works from Dr. Jensen.
  • Perilanim
I have read this book twice through and then some, and have found it a revealing and moving portrait of this gentle genious, among the most underrated of composers.

The previous reviewer's dismissal of this book is very unfair. There is generally enough musical analysis here to whet the appetite. I would agree that many of Schumann's later works have been neglected (The author would also agree, by the way.) and that a few early works such as Papillons and Carnaval are overexposed. Inevitably in a book of this sort, one will have favorite pieces that he feels have been given short shrift. (I do too.) But to trash the book because attention is not lavished on a rather minor output such as Gesang der Fruhe is seriously out of whack.
  • Conjulhala
SCHUMANN is a work of sound and thorough scholarship, refreshingly free of cant, pomposity, bombast, condescension, self-aggrandizement and arrogance, six pillars in the temple of bad academic writing. Mr. Jensen's thoughtful prose is eminently readable, his argument clear and convincing thanks in no small part to a masterly balancing of distance from and sympathy for his primary subject. The plight of temperament (in Schumann's case, genius) in conflict with ignorance, incomprehension, complacent professionalism and "benign" authoritarianism continues to be a matter of interest and concern. Who or what today would keep Schumann in a cage?