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Download Off the Record: The Technology and Culture of Sound Recording in America eBook

by David Morton

Download Off the Record: The Technology and Culture of Sound Recording in America eBook
ISBN:
0813527465
Author:
David Morton
Category:
Music
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press (December 1, 1999)
Pages:
240 pages
EPUB book:
1905 kb
FB2 book:
1747 kb
DJVU:
1158 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
985


Introduction - High culture, high fidelity, and the making of recordings in the American record industry . and the roots of American recording culture.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Recording culture in America emerged, Morton writes, not through the dictates of the technology itself but in complex ways that were contingent upon the actions of users. One of the misconceptions that Morton hopes to dispel is that the only important category of sound recording involves music.

David Morton wants to explain why recording technology has "become ubiquitous in our culture" and why it is important as "an everyday technology.

p. cm. Includes bibliographical references. Like the technology of writing, sound recording proved to be remarkably versatile, with many different uses in business and industry, in the home, in schools, churches, and almost everywhere else. Sound recording was destined to become more important, commercially and socially, than even Edison imagined.

Recorded sound has pervaded nearly every facet of modern life―not just popular . Very informative well written history of sound recording technology.

Recorded sound has pervaded nearly every facet of modern life―not just popular music. David L. Morton Jr. is a historian of technology with expertise in the history of sound recording, electronics, and electric power. There are many details in the book that I have never heard anywhere else. Morton presents the story in a straight forward prose that is easy to read. I only wish there were more photos and a maybe a few more references.

Recording culture in America emerged, Morton writes, not through the dictates of the technology alone but .

Recording culture in America emerged, Morton writes, not through the dictates of the technology alone but in complex ways that were contingent upon the actions of users. Readers will learn, for example, that the equipment to create the telephone answering machine has been around for a century, but that the ownership and use of these items was a hotly contested issue in the telephone industry at the turn of the twentieth-century. The most fascinating aspect of Off the Record involves tracing the complex paths by which devices that are now commonplace originally came into being, gained markets, and slowly evolved.

Recording culture in America emerged, Morton writes, not through the dictates of the . One of the misconceptions that Morton hopes to dispel is that the only important category of sound recording involves music

Mechanical Sound: Technology, Culture, and Public Problems of Noise in Thetwentieth Century

Mechanical Sound: Technology, Culture, and Public Problems of Noise in Thetwentieth Century. Karin Bijsterveld - 2008 - MIT Press. Recording Artists, Work for Hire, Employment, and Appropriation. Matt Stahl - unknown. Boys and Their Toys? Masculinity, Class, and Technology in America; Making Technology Masculine: Men, Women, and Modern Machines in America, 1870–1945. Ronald Kline - 2003 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 94:775-776. Science, Technology and Culture. David Bell - 2006 - Open University Press.

Off the Record: The Technology and Culture of Sound Recording in America. Lisa Gitelman, "Off the Record: The Technology and Culture of Sound Recording in America. David Morton," Isis 92, no. 1 (Ma. 2001): 218-219. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The History of Medicine and the Scientific Revolution. Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why?

Saying iPhone 100,000 Times - World Record Wacik 1 615 зрителей.

Saying iPhone 100,000 Times - World Record Wacik 1 615 зрителей.

David L. Morton examines the process of invention, innovation, and diffusion of communications technology, using the history of sound recording as the focus. Off the Record demonstrates how the history of both the hardware and the ways people used it is essential for understanding why any particular technology became a fixture in everyday life or faded into obscurity. Morton’s approach to the topic differs from most previous works, which have examined the technology’s social impact, but not the reasons for its existence. Recording culture in America emerged, Morton writes, not through the dictates of the technology itself but in complex ways that were contingent upon the actions of users.

Each of the case studies in the book emphasizes one of five aspects of the culture of recording and its relationship to new technology, at the same time telling the story of sound recording history. One of the misconceptions that Morton hopes to dispel is that the only important category of sound recording involves music. Unique in his broad-based approach to sound technology, the five case studies that Morton investigates are :     The phonograph recordRecording in the radio businessThe dictation machineThe telephone answering machine, andHome tapingReaders will learn, for example, that the equipment to create the telephone answering machine has been around for a century, but that the ownership and use of answering machines was a hotly contested issue in the telephone industry at the turn of the century, hence stifling its commercial development for decades. Morton also offers fascinating insight into early radio: that, while The Amos and Andy Show initially was pre-recorded and not broadcast live, the commercial stations saw this easily distributed program as an economic threat: many non-network stations could buy the disks for easy, relatively inexpensive replaying. As a result, Amos and Andy was sold to Mutual and went live shortly afterward.