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Download A Lifetime with Shakespeare: Notes from an American Director of All 38 Plays eBook

by Foreword by Harry Keyishian,Paul Barry

Download A Lifetime with Shakespeare: Notes from an American Director of All 38 Plays eBook
ISBN:
0786449535
Author:
Foreword by Harry Keyishian,Paul Barry
Category:
Performing Arts
Language:
English
Publisher:
McFarland; 1 edition (September 9, 2010)
Pages:
252 pages
EPUB book:
1412 kb
FB2 book:
1687 kb
DJVU:
1561 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
247


A Lifetime with Shakespeare book. Written by the only American to direct and fight-choreograph all of Shakespeare's plays, this text represents an expert and practical guide to the Bard's oeuvre.

A Lifetime with Shakespeare book. Written by the only American to direct and fight-choreograph.

And Paul Barry seems to know everything about Shakespeare. I consider those weekends some of the most important events of my life. With all that I have read about Shakespeare and his plays, I still learned a great deal from this book.

php?id 978-0-7864-4953-8. As Violet, Ellen Barry is an incredibly gifted actor, who balances her character’s many layers brilliantly. See actions taken by the people who manage and post content.

Электронная книга "A Lifetime with Shakespeare: Notes from an American Director of All 38 Plays", Paul Barry

Электронная книга "A Lifetime with Shakespeare: Notes from an American Director of All 38 Plays", Paul Barry. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A Lifetime with Shakespeare: Notes from an American Director of All 38 Plays" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

General Theater Books. A Lifetime with Shakespeare : Notes from an American Director of All 38 Plays. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. To ensure we are able to help you as best we can, please include your reference number: WO9K2IZNUK.

Each play is explored in its theatrical complexity, with particular attention paid to directorial and acting challenges, character quirks and .

Directing successes are recounted, but the failures are not shied away from, an indispensable text for anyone producing Shakespeare's plays" Provided by publisher. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

A lifetime with Shakespeare. notes from an American director of all 38 plays. Published 2010 by McFarland & Company, In. Publishers in Jefferson, . Directing successes are recounted, but the failures are not shied away from, an indispensable text for anyone producing Shakespeare's plays"-Provided by publisher. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Notes from an American Director of All 38 Plays

A Lifetime with Shakespeare : Notes from an American Director of All 38 Plays.

This alphabetical list of Shakespeare plays brings together all categories an. That’s all of Shakespeare’s play. e think. Some people believe Shakespeare wrote many more plays, but we’ll stick to the above play list until more concrete evidence emerges. First Folio inside pages, containing 36 Shakespeare plays. NSS says: at. Hi Pam, I’m afraid we don’t actually sell the plays in book form – only ebooks that you can’t print out and use as you like! Reply.

Written by the only American to direct and fight--choreograph all of Shakespeare's plays, this text represents an expert and practical guide to the Bard's oeuvre. From the Henry VI plays through The Tempest, each play is explored in its full theatrical complexity, with particular attention paid to directorial and acting challenges, character quirks and development, and the particularities of Shakespearean language. Directing successes are recounted, but the failures are not shied away from, making this work indispensable for anyone interested in producing plays by Shakespeare.
  • Vozuru
This is a book for anyone who loves Shakespeare, but especially important for those who direct or act in his plays. As we are told Paul Barry has the distinction of being the only American ever to have directed all of the Shakespeare plays.
I relished every page; I savored every word. There are surprises, revelations galore.
But I can attest from personal experience that the excellence of this enjoyable book reflects the singularity of the man who wrote it.
I was one of those privileged to have attended all seven of the Shakespeare Colloquia weekends at Drew University where I saw many of the productions alluded to in this book. The superb scholars Paul Barry brought to us and the discussions with them and among ourselves enriched those weekends. The Barrys are marvelous actors and interpreters. And Paul Barry seems to know everything about Shakespeare. I consider those weekends some of the most important events of my life.
With all that I have read about Shakespeare and his plays, I still learned a great deal from this book. And I had so much fun reading it.
I loved Barry's joke that latecomers are punished because they miss the expositions at the beginnings of plays and remain in confusion as they spend lots of energy and time trying to figure out what's going on.
Barry tells of one production of the very famous Hamlet where a youngster in the audience
reacts to the announcement of Ophelia's drowning by spontaneously exclaiming, "Oh, she died." He says how wonderful it was to be there when one person hears that and reacts to it for the first time.
Barry gives us insights throughout about things Shakespearians think they can never learn anything new about. Some examples:
His description of the first scene with Kate and Petrucchio.
Another is that Hamlet is the tale of three sons avenging father's deaths. You ask yourself, three? Hamlet avenging his father's death, okay. Laertes avenging Polonius's. Okay. So Barry reminds us of Fortinbras avenging his father's death.
In fact the whole chapter on Hamlet is filled with fascinating new information for me explaining the answers to many riddles we have about motivation.
I loved what Barry says about the coveted female role of Lady Macbeth. "Lady Mac is not a co star role:...Macbeth is not Antony and Cleopatra. Try telling that to a modern American actress, especially one with a name. she'll call her agent."
The story about the dog in a production of Two Gentlemen of Verona is hilarious.
Though the play is described as two families feuding, Barry asserts that the main conflicts in Romeo and Juliet are between teenagers and their parents.
Page 75 begins an overview of Shakespeare's warrior plays. This is a special area of Barry's expertise. I couldn't help thinking about the song, Imagine, and how naive and out of place it would be in this context.
The chapter on Troilas and Cressida is fabulous. This hash of a play gets the Barry treatment and it is terrific.
The paragraph on page 87 about how Julius Caesar begins gives a tiny insight. Just another example of the special quality of this book.
Barry elaborates on the goofy stage direction, "Exit, pursued by a bear", from A Winter's Tale, in a lengthy section full of information.

"There is no subtext in Shakespeare." I read that and thought, of course! Is that not marvelous?

In this book, Paul Barry's shares with the reader his extensive knowledge about text, religion, warfare, patriarchy in Shakespeare. Barry is expert in the rules of staging fighting scenes. He gives advice about how to rehearse. He constantly admonishes directors to trust and to stick to the script.

A wonderful read. This is a book I would recommend highly.
  • Bynelad
This is a very entertaining and informative book, full of wit and good sense and a passion for Shakespeare's plays. Part engaging memoir, part practical handbook, distilling a lifetime's creative experience of acting in and directing Shakespeare, it offers an opinionated (in the best sense) and useful reflection on the challenges, pitfalls and pleasures of staging the great Master Will. Certainly there are scholars who know the full canon well, but I can't imagine that there is another director who has such a comprehensive grasp of all these truly wonderful as well as the not-so-wonderful plays and who brings such an informed theater person's perspective to them.

The author's central dogma as a director: fidelity to the playwright and his text and to his emotional truths and his intellectual questionings, to his intentions insofar as study and research and deep thought can help in determining them. His exploration of individual plays and his discussion of specific problems in staging them is full of insights and of plain, but uncommon good sense. His discussions on casting, characterization, timing, motivation, the importance of seasons and times of day, and a host of other matters come from long experience in theater, but his approach is also informed by close scholarly study as well.
It would have been more pedestrian, perhaps, to do so, but there might have been some advantages had the author organized his discussion of the plays into genre categories: comedies, tragedies, histories and fantasies(?). But his discussion of individual plays is full of provocative insights. He is especially eloquent on the plays he regards as Shakespeare's great three: Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, and Lear.
With these masterworks, as with other of the plays, his book invites one to reread these treasures of our civilization along with his commentary as a guide to the challenges that staging them poses. One may not agree with all of his arguments, but he is never less than chanllenging. His love of the poetry and his readings of the plays are always stimulating and often moving.
The book offers many ideas for potential directors of these works as well as pleasures and illuminations for the general reader, not least in the elegance of its writing.