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Download Owls Head: On the Nature of Lost Things eBook

by Rosamond Purcell

Download Owls Head: On the Nature of Lost Things eBook
ISBN:
1593720335
Author:
Rosamond Purcell
Category:
Photography & Video
Language:
English
Publisher:
Quantuck Lane; 1st edition (November 5, 2007)
Pages:
224 pages
EPUB book:
1470 kb
FB2 book:
1801 kb
DJVU:
1737 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
602


Rosamond Purcell is a wonderful eccentric artist whose book is rich and dense with details of the detritus of things cast off and decaying as found in the acres of the junkyard known as Owl's Head.

A derelict antiques and scrap metal business in Owls Head, Maine, is the. Rosamond Purcell is a wonderful eccentric artist whose book is rich and dense with details of the detritus of things cast off and decaying as found in the acres of the junkyard known as Owl's Head. She has a passion and the prose to describe what we ordinarily turn away from. The book is a nice companion to the film about her work, An Art That Nature Makes.

Owls Head: On the Nature of Lost Things. But just as often she abandons a theme just as she gets beneath the surface or moves on to another sample before fully examining the specimen before us. Rosamond Purcell is known for her collaborations with Stephen Jay Gould, often in conjunction with natural history museums, including Illuminations, Finders Keepers and Strange Cases. The official photographer of the Mutter Collection, her work has been exhibited at major museums nationwide, and is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, The National Academy of Science, and The Victoria and Albert in London, among many others.

Rosamond Purcell is the author of Bookworm and Owls Head. She lives in Medford, Massachusetts.

A derelict antiques and scrap metal business in Owls Head, Maine, is the setting of this multi-layered word-portrait of its owner, William Buckminster, proprietor of an extraordinary collection of discarded and decaying items, g remnants of previous lives. Rosamond Purcell is the author of Bookworm and Owls Head.

Buckminster sold many of his items to Purcell, who took them home and photographed them in large-format Polaroid's.

Coauthors & Alternates.

Special Cases: Natural Anomalies and Historical Monsters. ISBN 9780811815680 (978-0-8118-1568-0) Hardcover, Chronicle Books, 1997. Find signed collectible books: 'Special Cases: Natural Anomalies and Historical Monsters'. Coauthors & Alternates.

The first thing Rosamond Purcell photographed at Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology . An Art That Nature Makes: The Work Of Rosamond Purcell.

An Art That Nature Makes: The Work Of Rosamond Purcell. Rosamond Purcell added an event. 26 September 2016 ·. SUN, 2 OCT 2016. Lost Museums: a Symposium on the Ephemerality & Afterlives of Museums & Collections MAY 6 – 8, 2015 BROWN UNIVERSITY & THE RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN PROVIDENCE, RI Held in conjunction with the year-long exhibition project on Brown’s lost Jenks Museum, the symposium addresses the history of museu.

Rosamond Purcell is a photographer best known for her hauntingly beautiful work in the back rooms of natural history museums. She is the author of Special Cases: Natural Anomalies and Historical Monsters, collaborative works with Stephen Jay Gould, and, most recently, Dice: Deception, Fate, and Rotten Luck (Quantuck Lane 2002) with Ricky Jay, who refers to her as the "doyenne of decaying objects. From Publishers Weekly

Her work has garnered international acclaim and she has released numerous books, including Book Nest, A Glorious Enterprise: The Museum of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, and Owls Head: On the Nature of Lost Things, which covers Purcell’s 20-year photographic excavation of a Maine junk yard. She has also collaborated with historian Stephen Jay Gould, magician Ricky Jay, and Shakespeare scholar Michael Witmore.

Rosamond Wolff Purcell (born 1942) is an American photographer. Purcell is known for her photographic works that explore subjects in natural history, science and biology. She was the subject of the 2016 documentary film An Art That Nature Makes: The Work of Rosamond Purcell by Molly Bernstein. Her work is included in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada. A matter of time (1975). Illuminations: A Bestiary (1986). Special Cases: Natural Anomalies and Historical Monsters (1998).

A derelict antiques and scrap metal business in Owls Head, Maine, is the setting of this multi-layered word-portrait of its owner, William Buckminster, proprietor of an extraordinary collection of discarded and decaying items, no-longer-functioning remnants of previous lives. Buckminster's world, which includes both his vaunted talents in the local pool halls and his sure knowledge of the seemingly endless number of fascinating objects from his vast supply, are inspiration for Purcell's carefully crafted meditation on collecting and entropy, and the signals both send to those of us willing to pay attention. 34 duotone footnote photographs.
  • Ustamya
author and subject both slightly nuts, but author is a highly regarded photographer and somewhat obsessive.
  • Morlurne
it's exactly I'm looking for!

Thank you very much!
  • Eayaroler
I hoped there would be more pictures, considering the authors photography skills and other books. The story was fascinating.
  • Innadril
Rosamond Purcell's photography class was on a field trip when she and her students first came upon William Buckminster's land. The eccentric antiques / junk dealer of Owls Head, Maine, had eleven acres of stuff piled high, in mounds and mounds, in and around several buildings. At first the artist in Purcell was intrigued; she was moved to photograph individual objects or random groupings of items. Then at various times over 20 years, she continued to stop to buy things and to talk to Buckminster himself. She took the items back to her own studio in Boston, where she arranged and rearranged them into her own special kind of artwork. And we're not talking about "whole" objects here -- rather, they include broken toys, books in varying stages of disintegration, pieces of furniture, old lobster traps, window frames, rusted parts of machinery.

Gradually Buckminster took on a near-mentor role for Purcell, and it's obvious the two vastly different people came to care about each other. She took him to museums and doctor?s appointments, he took her to pool halls. And as they climbed around the junk piles and investigated nooks and crannies in the buildings, Purcell learned more about Buckminster's personal history. The result is a kind of dual biography pressed against the backdrop of both the antique business and the art world, sometimes questioning which is which.

Some of Purcell's b&w photos accompany the text. But only the photo printed on the cover flyleaves gives us a grander perspective, as a wide shot of the property shows a pile of indecipherable objects stretching from one building to the next, one story high. Reading this book could be a nightmare for neat freaks. It can be heartening to those of us who are ordinary pack rats by comparison; for even after just a few pages, we can say to ourselves, "Well, at least I'm not THAT bad."

This is an unusual book, and it's difficult to nail down what audience it might appeal to. Fellow photographers may be interested in Purcell's process and artist's eye. Fans of Maine life might enjoy the depiction of the eccentricity of a real Down Easter. Still others might enjoy a respite from typical genres. You will certainly look at junk yards differently after reading this one.
  • Flathan
You will never feel guilty again when you collect. After reading this book I will pick up anything anywhere that means something to me - no matter what others might think!