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Download The Penguin Historical Atlas of Russia (Hist Atlas) eBook

by John Channon,Robert Hudson

Download The Penguin Historical Atlas of Russia (Hist Atlas) eBook
ISBN:
0670864617
Author:
John Channon,Robert Hudson
Category:
Atlases & Maps
Language:
English
Publisher:
Viking Adult; 1st edition (September 1, 1995)
Pages:
144 pages
EPUB book:
1166 kb
FB2 book:
1559 kb
DJVU:
1491 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
645


The benefit you get by reading this book is actually information inside this reserve incredible fresh, you will get information which is getting deeper an individual read a lot of information you will get.

The benefit you get by reading this book is actually information inside this reserve incredible fresh, you will get information which is getting deeper an individual read a lot of information you will get. This kind of The Penguin Historical Atlas of Russia (Hist Atlas) without we recognize teach the one who looking at it become critical in imagining and analyzing. Don’t be worry The Penguin Historical Atlas of Russia (Hist Atlas) can bring any time you are and not make your tote space or bookshelves’ grow to be full because you can have it inside your lovely laptop even cell phone.

This atlas covers Russia's history from the coming of the Slavic peoples and the invasion of the Swedish Rus and .

This atlas covers Russia's history from the coming of the Slavic peoples and the invasion of the Swedish Rus and the Mongols through the territorial expansion of Catherine the Great to the rise of communism, the Cold War era, and the disintegration of the Soviet Union.

Find nearly any book by Robert Hudson. by John Channon, Robert Hudson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780670864614 (978-0-670-86461-4) Hardcover, Viking Adult, 1995. by Robert Hudson, Sir Edwin Arnold.

The Penguin Historical Atlases are a great resource for those that are new to countries or perhaps are somewhat younger readers

The Penguin Historical Atlases are a great resource for those that are new to countries or perhaps are somewhat younger readers. In John Channon's version of Russian history, you'll find a concise, colorful and informative collection of articles spanning Russia's origins, the Tatars and establishment of imperial rule, through the Revolution, reforms and restructuring of the 20th Century. In a way it resembles something of a compilation of articles from a good illustrated encyclopedia.

Uses maps, text, and illustrations to present the history of Russia, from Kievan Rus to the dissolution of the Soviet Union. ISBN13:9780140513264.

John Channon, Robert Hudson. Feb 15, 2016 Bruinrefugee rated it liked it. Shelves: history, non-fiction, russia, owned. On the one hand, any book/historical atlas that covers Russia is a good thing, since this huge, historically important country tends to be slighted in English books - although the situation seems to be improving some. This entry in the Penguin Historical Atlas series is thus helpful by graphically showing the development and growth of the Russian state. That said, this is one of the poorer entries in the series.

London : Penguin Books Ltd. ; New York : Penguin Books USA Inc. Collection. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Uses maps, text, and illustrations to present the history of Russia, from Kievan Rus to the dissolution of the Soviet Union
  • Nightscar
As a long time student of history, I've been delighted by the relatively recent growth in popularity of the Historical Atlas. Studying the cultures of ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt and China or Medieval England, France and Germany and others is much easier for me when I've got plenty of date sensitive maps to refer to, giving geographical context to ebb and flow of events over time.

But I guess I've been spoiled when studying works about these other cultures, where there seems to be plenty of information about what went on in the distant past. It seems we can uncover the nick-name of the king's dentist when we're studying ancient Egypt. But I'm increasingly frustrated when it comes to my efforts to study the more distant portions of Russia's past, and this book, I must admit, was no exception. While providing excellent coverage of the more recent/modern chapters of Russia's past, this book, like every other history of Russia I've been able to find, seems to suggest that we just don't know much about the early stages of Russian history.

I'm glad to have the few maps on Early Russia that this book provides. They do add some helpful map based context to other works I've read, and that's always appreciated. But the more I study Russia, the more I'm convinced that if you're a historian or archaeologist and want to pursue a field where there's still a LOT of history to be uncovered ... try Russia on for size. The challenge will be considerable ... but so's the opportunity.
  • Steel_Blade
This is not a history book . This book is a short description of the historic moments of this nation. It is like a reminder for those who already have studied it as student during the youth I wanted to have an illustrated book with maps to refresh my memory, ,so I found the book useful. Excellent condition!
  • Yozshunris
Detailed maps combine with a more detailed writen history of Russia for more examanination but the maps bring it alive for you.
  • Nilasida
Due to a recent Russian reading experience I wanted to know more of the history of the people, customs, and living conditions - as well as the ruling classes during the revolutions - this map made it easier to put myself there while reading the book.
  • Ceck
I had trouble following the sequence of events, as it does not appear to me to flow in chronological order.
  • Kulalas
Being interested in the historical expansion of Russia across Asia, I had high hopes for this book, since it was produced by the same publisher that gave us the excellent historical atlases of Europe and North America. However, unlike Colin McEvedy's invaluable works, I think this book was unfocused, convoluted and sloppy.

Where McEvedy's works were the epitome of conciseness, and could cover a half century's worth of continental-wide geopolitical change in a single page, this purported historical_atlas_of Russian history is crammed full of photos, cartoons, paintings and page after page of unnecessary text. Rejecting the brilliant simplicity of McEvedy's books, whose method was to generally show a snapshot of the political map in a single year, with accompanying text explaining the changes since the previous map, this book often shows hundreds of years worth of overlapping border changes on a single map, with different colored arrows- representing military campaigns- snaking their way through the resulting mishmash. The effect is often utter confusion.

Certain important subjects are given short shrift while comparatively insignificant areas receive inordinate attention. Russian expansion into Asia is dealt with by a single very, very bad map, and while the maps dealing with the expansion into the Caucuses and "the Stans" are ok, the explanatory text is unsatisfactorily cursory. Conversely, we are given much information on the location of various factories and industries within Russia, as well as maps of Moscow and the Sevastopol battlefield. The layout of the book is chronologically deranged as well. Can anyone explain to me why you would have a map of 1930s Europe, then have an entire chapter dealing with the history of the 20th century USSR until its dissolution, and_then_throw in a mere 2 maps on WWII? Similarly, why would you have a page with a map on the breakup of the USSR, and_then_finish the book with a chapter on Khrushchev's agricultural policies?? It just doesn't make sense.

You can learn from this book. It has some good maps and some good information. However, "some" is he operative word. Too much dross and too little editing spoiled what could have been a very useful work.
  • Whitestone
The Penguin Historical Atlases are a great resource for those that are new to countries or perhaps are somewhat younger readers. In John Channon's version of Russian history, you'll find a concise, colorful and informative collection of articles spanning Russia's origins, the Tatars and establishment of imperial rule, through the Revolution, reforms and restructuring of the 20th Century. In a way it resembles something of a compilation of articles from a good illustrated encyclopedia.
The appeal of the volume is in it's size, illustrations and charts- I think of it as a kind of annotated "table of contents" to Russian history. It's a great resource to get the basic synopsis of a period, person or event that you can then take to a larger volume for greater detail. If you are looking for a great coffee table book or in depth Russian history, this isn't it.
As a neophyte to all things Russian, I found this to be the attractive appetizer that inspired me to really delve into Russian history and affairs.
While visiting a friend a few years ago in Siberia, he was struck by the readability, illustrations and usefulness of my copy-- yes, I brought it with me... He loved it so much, that I just had to leave it with him when I left. I now have purchased my second copy.
It's a great little introduction to Russia.
I have been teaching the history of Russia at Cornel University for many years and have never found a completely satistfactory hisitorical atlas. Channon's work is defintely the best available. The maps are in color and deal with most of the main issues. A notable omission is a map showing the climatic zones which moulded the life of the Russian people.