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by Ali Dashti,L. P. Elwell-Sutton

Download In Search of Omar Khayyam eBook
ISBN:
0048910430
Author:
Ali Dashti,L. P. Elwell-Sutton
Category:
Encyclopedias & Subject Guides
Publisher:
Allen & Unwin (November 25, 1971)
Pages:
276 pages
EPUB book:
1214 kb
FB2 book:
1744 kb
DJVU:
1482 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
577


Francois De Blois, Persian Literature – A Bio-Bibliographical Survey: Poetry of the Pre-Mongol Period (2004), p. 307. ^ a b Bashiri, Iraj. Fitzgerald is doubly guilty because he was more of a Sufi than he was willing to admit. C. H. A. Bjerregaard, Sufism: Omar Khayyam and E. Fitzgerald, The Sufi Publishing Society (1915), p. 3.

a b Edward Denison Ross, Omar Khayyam, Bulletin of the School Of Oriental Studies London Institution (1927)

a b Edward Denison Ross, Omar Khayyam, Bulletin of the School Of Oriental Studies London Institution (1927). Francois De Blois, Persian Literature – A Bio-Bibliographical Survey: Poetry of the Pre-Mongol Period (2004), p.

By (author) Ali Dashti, Translated by L. P. Elwell-Sutton. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Translated from the Persian by . Published 1971 by Allen & Unwin in London. Persian studies monographs - no. 1. Classifications.

Ali Dashti, Lawrence Paul Elwell-Sutton (Translator). The book was a study of the verification of some of the claims that people in the past have made in having translated the 4 line quatrains of Omar Khayyam. I must admit that I have begun to doubt whether one of my all time Omar Khayyam quatrains was actually his based on this book. Here it is: Here with a Loaf of Bread beneath the Bough, A Flask of Wine, a Book of Verse - and Thou Beside me singing in the Wilderness - A I was not overly impressed with this book to be honest.

Ali Dashti therefore constructs a likeness of the poet from references found in the works of writers of his day or. .Note on Transliteration.

Ali Dashti therefore constructs a likeness of the poet from references found in the works of writers of his day or immediately after, and from Khayyam’s own works on philosophy, mathematics and astronomy, of which the authenticity is not questioned. Khayyam emerges as a widely read and broad-minded scholar, immersed in his own studies, cautious and moderate, averse to committing himself on controversial questions.

Dashtī, ʻAlī, 1895-1982. Uniform Title: Damī bā Khayyām. Publication, Distribution, et. Columbia University Press (c). Physical Description: 276 p. front. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. Translated from the Persian by L.

Dashtī, ʻAlī, 1895-. Columbia University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Personal Name: Dashti?, ?Ali?, 1895-. Download DOC book format. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Translated by L. New York: Columbia University Press, 1971. Dashti describes the character of Omar Khayyám by studying him through the eyes of Khayyám’s contemporaries’ writings. On the basis of this portrait, Dashti authenticates thirty-six quatrains with some confidence, translates them along with other quatrains, and examines their literary style. Untermeyer, Louis, ed. Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám: Translated into English Quatrains by Edward FitzGerald. New York: Random House, 1947.

  • Sarin
It was very useful to my research on Omar Khayyam!
  • Cordann
Ali Dashti's book is a detective story. He uses all the clues in Omar Khayyam's known biography and writings to paint a picture of what kind of person Omar was. Dashti then goes through the myriad of quatrains (rubaiyat) attributed to `The Tentmaker', trying to sift out obviously counterfeit verses. He goes on to find those that reveal beliefs contrary to what we know of Khayyam's own. Dashti looks for personality traits not reflecting what we know of Omar. And Dashti finally establishes a corpus that MAY be the quatrains actually spoken by Khayyam (since there is no record of him ever having written down a single quatrain!). Along the way, Dashti teaches us a lot about 11th century intellectual history under the Seljuk Turks. He explains why Khayyam could never have been an Ismaili, and how close he came to accepting certain aspects of Sufism. We learn that the so-called `Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam' is no such thing, but a poetic creation by 19th century British writer Edward FitzGerald (who was `inspired by' a manuscript in the Bodleian library purportedly containing verses of Khayyam). We also find out that Khayyam should have been famous primarily as a mathematician and astronomer; he was greatly revered in his era (and into modern times!) for his work in those fields. We discover that Khayyam developed a calendar more accurate than the modern Gregorian calendar, and did pioneering work in cubic and other algebraic equations. -Dashti's tome is a true exploration of times past. (It's a pity this book is out of print!). Dashti, who died in his 80s of injuries inflicted on him in one of Khomeni's jails, wrote with grace and knowledge. Even when one disagrees or questions his chain of thought, it remains fascinating and reasonable. I have re-read parts of this work several times (after going cover to cover twice!), and I do not spend that kind of time on any but the best books! Oh, do not miss the absolutely excellent introduction L.P. Elwell-Sutton, which is a fascinating overview; this is what an introduction truly should be!