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Download THE HEAVENLY CITY: A SPIRITUAL GUIDEBOOK eBook

by EMANUEL SWEDENBORG,Lee Woofenden

Download THE HEAVENLY CITY: A SPIRITUAL GUIDEBOOK eBook
ISBN:
0877851441
Author:
EMANUEL SWEDENBORG,Lee Woofenden
Category:
Encyclopedias & Subject Guides
Language:
English
Publisher:
Swedenborg Foundation Publishers; 1st edition (December 1, 1993)
Pages:
120 pages
EPUB book:
1489 kb
FB2 book:
1639 kb
DJVU:
1585 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
699


The Heavenly City is Swedenborg's own brief introduction to his religious ideas . Translated by Lee Woofenden and published in 1993 by the Swedenborg Foundation, West Chester, Pennsylvania

The Heavenly City is Swedenborg's own brief introduction to his religious ideas, translated into readable modern English. Translated by Lee Woofenden and published in 1993 by the Swedenborg Foundation, West Chester, Pennsylvania.

A Spiritual Guidebook. By Emanuel Swedenborg Translated by Lee Woofenden

A Spiritual Guidebook. By Emanuel Swedenborg Translated by Lee Woofenden. A new translation of Emanuel Swedenborg’s short work The New Jerusalem and Its Heavenly Doctrine. In Emanuel Swedenborg’s short work The New Jerusalem and Its Heavenly Doctrine, Swedenborg transforms many conventional religious ideas into vital new concepts, exploring the stages of spiritual growth, examining the deeper structure of the human mind, and giving new meaning to many Christian beliefs and practices. This modern translation by Lee Woofenden puts Swedenborg’s timeless ideas in simple, readable English.

Emanuel Swedenborg, Lee Woofenden (Translation)

Emanuel Swedenborg, Lee Woofenden (Translation). I finished reading Emanuel Swedenborg’s book, The Heavenly City: A Spiritual Guidebook. This book contains many very important ideas, and I regard it as quite worthwhile for me to read. However, as was the case in some of Swedenborg’s other books that I read, I found myself having strong disagreement with his worldview, IF I correctly understand him. I refer specifically to Swedenborg’s claims that nothing good whatsoever can come from human beings.

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Lee Woofenden’s most popular book is The Heavenly City: A Spiritual Guidebook. Showing 25 distinct works. The Heavenly City: A Spiritual Guidebook by. Emanuel Swedenborg, Lee Woofenden (Translation).

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Similar books and articles. The Heavenly City: A Spiritual Guidebook. Emanuel Swedenborg - 1993 - Swedenborg Foundation Publishers

Similar books and articles. Emanuel Swedenborg - 1993 - Swedenborg Foundation Publishers. A Swedenborg Sampler: Selections From Heaven and Hell, Divine Love and Wisdom, Divine Providence, True Christianity, and Secrets of Heaven. George F. Dole, Lisa Hyatt Cooper & Jonathan S. Rose (ed. - 2011 - Swedenborg Foundation Publishers.

by Emanuel Swedenborg, Trans. Book Description Swedenborg's teachings on kindness and his critique of materialism in this compelling essay on spiritual development are relevant today.

This new translation of De Novo Hierosolyma Et Ejus Doctrina Coelesti (alternatively translated The New Jerusalem and Its Heavenly Doctrine) by Emanuel Swedenborg presents the ideas of this Swedish visionary in simple, modern English.

Emanuel Swedenborg (1993). The Heavenly City: A Spiritual Guidebook, Chrysalis Books. Apocalypse Explained". Book by Emanuel Swedenborg, translated by John Whitehead, No. 1180, ww. acred-texts. Heaven is not located on high, but where the good of love is, and this resides within a person, wherever he or she might be. Emanuel Swedenborg. Love Is, Heaven, Might.

This new translation of De Novo Hierosolyma Et Ejus Doctrina Coelesti (alternatively translated The New Jerusalem and Its Heavenly Doctrine) by Emanuel Swedenborg presents the ideas of this Swedish visionary in simple, modern English. In the short work, Swedenborg discusses our motivations and inner natures, love and selfishness, and ways in which we can develop ourselves as spiritual people. He also covers different aspects of religion, such as the Bible, observances like baptism and the Holy Supper (Eucharist), the nature of heaven and hell, and how we can apply all these ideas to our daily lives.

  • Iraraeal
Whatever your views of Swedenborg, there are pearls of wisdom and profound truths stated in this text. I recommend this book to all my friends.
  • Bulace
The Heavenly City is Swedenborg's own brief introduction to his religious ideas, translated into readable modern English. If you want to get the basics on Swedenborg in his own words--without having to struggle through old-fashioned translations--this is the book for you!

Contents

Introduction: The New Sky, the New Land, and What "The New Jerusalem" Means

Preface: A Comparison of Ancient and Present-Day Religion

Part I: Our Inner Structure

1. Goodness and Truth

2. Motivation and Understanding

3. Our Inner and Outer Selves

Part II: Our Different Loves

4. Love in General

5. Selfishness and Materialism

6. Loving Other People, or Kindness

Part III: Our Spiritual Life

7. Faith

8. Religious Devotion

9. Conscience

10. Freedom

11. Taking Credit for Our Actions

Part IV: Our Spiritual Development

12. Regretting our Faults and Giving Them Up

13. Rebirth

14. Inner Struggles

Part V: Christian Observances

15. Baptism

16. The Holy Supper

Part VI: Life After Death

17. Rising from Death

18. Heaven and Hell

Part VII: Facets of Religion

19. The Christian Religion

20. The Bible: A Holy Book

21. The Lord's Provision for Us

22. The Lord

23. Religious and Political Government
  • Pipet
I might never have bought this book on my own, but I was in a church study group. This book was first published in Latin in 1758, before the American revolution. Swedenborg had been trained in science and engineering, and worked in mining. According to the Introduction, this book, "the philosophy of the new religion," comes from heaven. "The only difference between things in heaven and things on earth is that everything in heaven is at a higher stage of development; everything there is spiritual, and spiritual things are far more developed than material things." (p. 6). This book is quite small, about a hundred pages. Kant must have read far more of Swedenborg's dreams and visions before writing his book, DREAMS OF A SPIRIT-SEER ILLUSTRATED BY DREAMS OF METAPHYSICS in 1766. Kant had been hoping, before he read all he had of Swedenborg, that Swedenborg would be able to provide some explanation for the powers of telepathy which Swedenborg possessed, which were most amazing. This book is confined to the topic of religion.
Things have changed in some denominations since 1758. A note by the translator alleges that those churches where "people are not allowed to read the Bible" (p. 7) are different now. Harmony, in this book, relates to a divine plan. "Goodness and truth come from the divine, which is the source of everything. This means there cannot be anything in heaven or on earth that does not relate to these two things." (p. 13). Since human beings have motivation and understanding, "The goodness in us is our motivation, and the truth in us is our understanding." (p. 15). An additional twofold aspect: "In good people, the inner part is in heaven with its light, and the outer part is in the world with its light. . . . In harmful people, the inner part is in the world with its light, and so is the outer part." (p. 17). For most people, "We are `sense-oriented' when our inner part is so superficial that we do not believe anything unless we can see it with our own eyes and touch it with our own hands. When we are like this, we are the lowest type of materialist, entangled in fallacies about everything that has to do with religious faith. . . . The body is just an extra outer part added on, in which the other two exist." (p. 20). Everything after that is about spirit. "Thinking and motivation are the spirit's inner part, and speech and action are its outer part." (p. 20).
Chapter 10, on "Freedom," starts to illustrate certain dangers. "Things we do under compulsion do not come from our own motivation, but from the motivation of whoever is forcing us to do them. . . . Freedom to do good things and freedom to do harmful things are as different and as distant from each other as heaven is from hell, though they seem outwardly similar. Freedom to do good things comes from heaven, and is called heavenly freedom. Freedom to do harmful things comes from hell, and is called hellish freedom." (p. 54). Religion becomes more important in Chapter 12: "When we are living in kindness and faith, we regret our faults every day. We think about our bad traits, admit them, avoid acting on them, and ask the Lord for help." (p. 63). Not only do we suffer when we are under compulsion, according to Chapter 13, "Every bad trait that has become second nature to us through long habit is passed on to our children. . . . Finally, so many bad traits have been passed down to us that all of our life is nothing but faults." (p. 67). But society has become so revolutionary in all its aspects, breaking chains of compulsion so often, all we are left with is Chapter 14, "Inner Struggles." As the thoroughly modern Christian (pretty amazing for a book written in 1758), Swedenborg proclaims, "So you can see that inner struggles are brought on by hell and are not from heaven. This is part of Christian belief, which says that God does not torment anyone." (p. 71).
Part V, Christian Observances, has religious explanations, such as "Heaven and Hell," which reflects "we stay there forever," (p. 84) either way. Part VII, Facets of Religion, tackles philosophy in Chapter 19. "But our religious philosophy by itself does not make us religious--only living by that philosophy does. This means faith by itself does not make a religion, but living by our faith, which is kindness, does make a religion." (p. 87). On government, the idea, "These officials should reward people who live in an orderly way, and punish people who defy law and order." (p. 101) There is probably a lawyer somewhere who thinks that means we should make all tax cuts permanent, and build more prisons, and his client's accountants might even agree. "Otherwise, the human race will be lost." (p. 101). But, "Rulers who believe that they themselves have the authority are not very wise," (p. 103) which must have been how Freud felt when he wished he had written "I can heartily recommend the Gestapo to anyone" before he left Vienna.
  • VariesWent
This is a book you will continue to return to year after year.

I like to re-read it at the begining of each year to refresh faith walk.

It is for the seeker who is looking to understand Christianity in a fresh new way. This book is for people of all faiths.

It is simple and a wonderful introduction to the faith Swedenborg had.

If you take to heart the ideas in this book, you will grow spiritually.