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Download Stylish Academic Writing eBook

by Helen Sword

Download Stylish Academic Writing eBook
ISBN:
0674064488
Author:
Helen Sword
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harvard University Press; 31698th edition (April 2, 2012)
Pages:
240 pages
EPUB book:
1838 kb
FB2 book:
1893 kb
DJVU:
1231 kb
Other formats
lrf mbr lrf txt
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
706


Helen Sword’s book contains much wisdo. tylish Academic Writing contains superb counsel for academics .

Helen Sword’s book contains much wisdo. tylish Academic Writing contains superb counsel for academics who want to write with greater clarity and skill. Barton Swaim, Weekly Standard. Dana S. Dunn, Psychology Today.

Stylish Academic Writing book. Helen Sword rips the veil off one of the worst kept secrets in all of academia: Most academic writing is just plain awful. Jargon-filled, abstract, impersonal, sleep-inducing. Elegant data and ideas deserve elegant expression, argues. What makes Sword's Stylish Academic Writing different is that she has data to back up her claims. She studied five hundred recent articles from academic journals evenly spread over ten different disciplines.

Stylish Academic Writing showcases a range of scholars from the sciences, humanities, and social sciences who write with vividness and panache. Individual chapters take up specific elements of style, such as titles and headings, chapter openings, and structure, and close with examples of transferable techniques that any writer can master. In the New York Times, read Helen Sword’s introduction to spoooooky mutant verbs -and her sage advice about zombie nouns.

Stylish Academic Writing showcases a range of scholars from the sciences, humanities, and social sciences who write with vividness and panache

Stylish Academic Writing showcases a range of scholars from the sciences, humanities, and social sciences who write with vividness and panache. Stylish Academic Writing. Stylish Academic Writing Helen Sword. HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS Cambridge, Massachusetts & London, England 2012.

How do successful academics write, and where do they find the air and light and time and space, in the words of. .Elegant data and ideas deserve elegant expression, argues Helen Sword in this lively guide to academic writing.

Stylish Academic Writing.

By writing stylishly we can take care of the reader, that all important someone who we write MBSC State Room for. Sword neatly divides her book into two parts, along with an Helen Sword is traveling from extensive bibliography. Part one is based on analyses of jour- Auckland, NZ for a workshop with nals and writing guides, as well as surveys of academics, al- UNO faculty: lowing us a glimpse of the gap between what is thought to be Habits of Highly Effective good writing and what is actually published. Throughout these and other chapters are prompts to cross disciplinary bounda- Writers ries,.

Academic Writing is fundamentally a practical book, based on the idea that such. stylish writing can be studied and practiced – and therefore improved and. cultivated.

Helen SWORD (2012), Stylish Academic Writing, Harvard, MA: Harvard University Press. Academic Writing is fundamentally a practical book, based on the idea that such. Sword conducted interviews with scholars, studied articles and books identified. as exemplary, and analyzed numerous articles from various disciplines and style. The first section of the book considers style in academic writing in general.

Elegant data and ideas deserve elegant expression, argues Helen Sword in this lively guide to academic writing. For scholars frustrated with disciplinary conventions, and for specialists who want to write for a larger audience but are unsure where to begin, here are imaginative, practical, witty pointers that show how to make articles and books a pleasure to read-and to write.

Elegant data and ideas deserve elegant expression, argues Helen Sword in this lively guide to academic writing. For scholars frustrated with disciplinary conventions, and for specialists who want to write for a larger audience but are unsure where to begin, here are imaginative, practical, witty pointers that show how to make articles and books a pleasure to read―and to write.

Dispelling the myth that you cannot get published without writing wordy, impersonal prose, Sword shows how much journal editors and readers welcome work that avoids excessive jargon and abstraction. Sword’s analysis of more than a thousand peer-reviewed articles across a wide range of fields documents a startling gap between how academics typically describe good writing and the turgid prose they regularly produce.

Stylish Academic Writing showcases a range of scholars from the sciences, humanities, and social sciences who write with vividness and panache. Individual chapters take up specific elements of style, such as titles and headings, chapter openings, and structure, and close with examples of transferable techniques that any writer can master.

  • Clonanau
Author Helen Sword read and analyzed 1,000 articles published in academic journals in 10 disciplines to determine what constitutes stylish academic writing. She also studied 100 recently-published style guides to see where they agreed and differed on points of academic writing style. In Stylish Academic Writing she shares what she's learned about what makes a good article. In fourteen chapters she discusses voice, sentence construction, titles, hooks, jargon, article structure, citation style, creative academic writing, and more.

Two of the chapters speak most to me: the one on voice, and the other on citation style. They both speak to pet peeves of mine. The first is when an author has to mangle their writing to avoid using the first person. Much of the writing in library science is reporting on a project or case study, in which the author is simply telling a story about how a project was launched, carried out or successfully completed. It makes no sense to not be able to use the first person when telling this story. But if you look at much of the library science literature, you'll see many of these stories told in a way that puts a distance between the reader and what's being shared. This makes the article harder to read, and less interesting. Articles should be written in a way that conveys all of the important information that the author is trying to share, but in a way that will increase readership. Writing in the first person can help with that goal. Sword advocates for the use of the first person when possible.

My second pet peeve has to do with citation styles that require the author to put names, dates, and sometimes page numbers in parentheses right in the text. When I read an article that has a lot of citations, I sometimes find it difficult to follow the threads of a sentence or paragraph through all of these parenthetical citations. The simple use of endnotes, identified with a superscripted number, avoids this problem. Sentences and paragraphs with the simple numbered indication of an endnote are much easier to read and comprehend than one with the citations in parentheses interrupting the flow. Again, the goal is to share information and increase the readership of each article, and a simpler citation style does that. Sword supports the use of simpler citation styles that don't interrupt the flow of the article.

While I'm only highlighting two issues in this review, Sword's book is full of good advice. She illustrates all of her chapters with both good and bad examples so readers can understand what makes good writing, and what hinders comprehension. I believe this book would be useful to all academics who want to improve their writing.
  • Shistus
Stylish Academic Writing (SAW) changed the way I view academic writing: completing my MA in Early Childhood Development, Sword's advice provides the courage and confidence to be brave in style, liberating me from the conventions of academic writing. Sword writes with flair and mild humour, reading it in two days; I was hooked. Her approach is revelationary, providing immediate results. Stylish Academic Writing has become a 'go to' reference when I need encouragement or inspiration; my writing has improved, ensuring I am better equipped to critique other's work. My literature review is imminent, and Helen ( I feel like she is an additional supervisor at this stage) has provided the licence to forgo anything referred to as 'turgid writing'... I feel liberated. I am a diligent student and love the area of research I'm involved with; tenacity is my middle name. However; until I read SAW, I viewed my inability to get through some of the jargon-filled, dense journal articles as my fault. This shift in thinking has made space for more productive reading, unafraid to put something down and find another more accessible research paper when needed. I have started to notice the academic flair of others and can identify preferences. Stylish Academic Writing has rapidly become my touchstone, and Helen Sword is my new mind-crush... Additionally, I recommend you check out 'The Writer's Diet', a free, online service, that dissects your writing, providing a diagnosis...anything beyond 'fit and trim' and it's back to the writing table...
  • Tygralbine
A solid reminder of how bloated academic writing is unnecessary. I have read many of these recommendations before, great title, avoid passive voice, tell a story. I appreciate the research that supports these recommendations. This is something to give to emerging academic writers and those caught in the land of stilted language.
  • lubov
This exceptional primer on stylish academic writing deserves a place on many more university book shelves. Helen Sword, the author, fights zombie nouns, clarifies citation styles, and illuminates the perils of terrible writing. Fortunately, she also provides practical suggestions so academics can clearly convey information and insights in a compelling manner. By the way, the popular TED-ED video on Zombie Nouns is based on an excerpt in this fine book. In short, it behooves more graduate students, junior academics, and university hiring committees to at least scan this wonderful style guide.