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Download A Late Dinner: Discovering the Food of Spain eBook

by Paul Richardson

Download A Late Dinner: Discovering the Food of Spain eBook
ISBN:
0747594554
Author:
Paul Richardson
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (August 6, 2007)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1302 kb
FB2 book:
1930 kb
DJVU:
1623 kb
Other formats
lit azw doc lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
988


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Paul Richardson is the perfect guide. In lush prose he brings to life the fascinating people who grow and cook and eat the hugely varied and still little-known food of Spain. Richardson's vibrant writing takes readers beyond gazpacho and paella and immerses them in the flavorful world of Spanish food - from the typical coastal cuisine; to the ancient shepherd cooking of the mountains; to the cities of Madrid.

Late Dinner: Discovering the Food of Spain. Paul Richardson is the perfect guide. Late Dinner - Paul Richardson. Richardson's vibrant writing takes readers beyond gazpacho and paella and immerses them in the flavorful world of Spanish food - from the typical coastal cuisine; to the ancient shepherd cooking of the mountains; to the cities of Madrid, Barcelona, and San Sebastián, where chefs are setting the trend for modern cuisine across the globe.

A Late Dinner: discovering the food of Spain The latest book by acclaimed writer Paul Richardson is a unique vision of Spain and its food. For a long time Spanish cooking, like Spain itself, was locked in the past. Until a few decades ago, traditional food was all there was. And old-fashioned forms of eating, with the ingredients and dishes typical of region, village, time of year, and occasion, still form the bedrock of the nation’s culinary habits even today. But there is more to the story than this

In 1991, British food writer Paul Richardson zipped away from London in his Mini to set up house with a Spanish agronomist on the disco-dotted . The trip is the basis of his new book, A Late Dinner: Discovering the Food of Spain

In 1991, British food writer Paul Richardson zipped away from London in his Mini to set up house with a Spanish agronomist on the disco-dotted island of Ibiza. More than 15 years later, Richardson and his partner have comfortably slipped into a life as gentlemen farmers in Spain’s Extremadura region. The trip is the basis of his new book, A Late Dinner: Discovering the Food of Spain. The Iberian Peninsula typically has been overshadowed by France and Italy in everything from Grand Tour travelogues to the 20th-century expat-memoirs made famous by Peter Mayle and Frances Mayes. This year has been different.

On reading John Dickie's Delizia! and Paul Richardson's A Late Dinner, Tom Jaine finds simple peasant fare is not all it's . The rewards of these books lie principally in the pleasing contradictions they explore in our attitudes to food. Think, for example, of our glorification of the peasant lifestyle.

On reading John Dickie's Delizia! and Paul Richardson's A Late Dinner, Tom Jaine finds simple peasant fare is not all it's cracked up to be in a culinary tour of Europe. Would the River Café or Hugh ll have much meaning were the nebulous backdrops of a Tuscan farmhouse or a straw-chewing Dorset labourer not ever-present? Neither Dickie nor Richardson has many illusions about the wonders of the peasant diet. A Late Dinner is an entertaining culinary journey through Spain. The author writes in the first person, so you feel like you make the trip with him.

A Late Dinner is an entertaining culinary journey through Spain. I should state here that I read the book first from the library, then bought several copies to give as gifts plus one for myself. This book is a must for lovers of Spanish cuisine, particularly if they are planning a trip to Spain. The author goes into exquisite detail about the history of the cuisine of each region as he travels around the country. A Late Dinner is a glorious and intimately drawn portrait of Spain. Richardson traces the roots of Spanish cooking to the landscape, the people, and the history of this beautiful and complex country. Vivid and richly textured, A Late Dinner is a delightful journey through Spain and Spanish cuisine.

Vivid and richly textured, A Late Dinner is a delightful journey through Spain and Spanish cuisine.

  • Jan
A Late Dinner is an entertaining culinary journey through Spain. The author writes in the first person, so you feel like you make the trip with him. I should state here that I read the book first from the library, then bought several copies to give as gifts plus one for myself. Then I gave that one away, so I had to buy another one for myself. This book is a must for lovers of Spanish cuisine, particularly if they are planning a trip to Spain. The author goes into exquisite detail about the history of the cuisine of each region as he travels around the country. He tells what foods each region is famous for and the best restaurants to enjoy it. The title refers to the Spanish custom of eating dinner at what would be considered a late hour to Americans.
  • Jogas
I am enjoying this book as a brush up on general history of Spain and understanding the food of Spain.
  • Braendo
It was interesting in the beginning then got a little repetitive and I got board. Then I can to the part about the pigs being raised and how they were killed and dressed. I know pork is from pigs and beef is from cattle, I don't to want know any more. Grossed me out and I was done with the book.
  • Akinozuru
I love Spain and lived there for a year. I love Spanish cuisine. But whether I'm there, Ireland or in the States, I'm not into name-dropping, which this author serves up as one of his dishes at every meal. I was expecting more history about certain Spanish cuisines, but because this is Spain and because Spain's cuisine often hides in the shadows of its European neighbors' cuisines, I'm bumping it up one. But Mr. Fitzpatrick's review is spot on.

I'm just thankful the Spanish don't for for haggis.
  • Meztihn
I picked up Richardson's book intending to read only the chapter on Barcelona, in anticipation of a trip I plan to make, but once I got started, I had to read it all. This is a vividly written, big-hearted book, a book about not only the food, but also the landscape, history and culture of Spain. I loved it.
  • Coiril
I read (part of) this book in anticipation of a trip to Madrid and points south and was very disappointed. Few suggestions were given, high-end restaurants were mentioned to the exclusion of others, lots of chef name-dropping. Not worth the money.
  • Nalmetus
Everyone has their own taste when it comes to food and the same goes for books about food and cookery.

I would never consider eating octopus, sushi or glazed duck, for example, or reading celebrity chefs like Jamie Oliver or Heston Blumenthal, for example, but many people do.

I hate so say this but even though I am a Scotsman, I have always been a bit queasy when faced with haggis although I did my patriotic duty and wired in with the backing of a dram or two.

However, I have always been interested in reading about other people's opinions about food.

About 40 years ago I had a Penguin edition of a recipe book by Len Deighton. I thought his spy novels were terrible but loved this book.

I have a tattered copy of Elizabeth David's "French Provincial Cooking" which I bought over 20 years ago and have read a thousand times. I am not sure she knew French cuisine as much as she claimed and she comes over as a latter-day Lady Bracknell but it's still enjoyable to read (as are the memoirs of the American Elizabeth David, Julia Child).

Now, to the main course. This book is not bad but it is not that good either. It's a so-so meal you are not going to complain about but you're not going to rave about it either.

The author has lived in Spain for a couple of decades, has established roots and knows the language unlike someone like Peter Mayle who has made his reputation writing clichéd rubbish about France and the French.

Richardson takes us around the country and presents the different kinds of cuisine and give us some historical background along with a few personal anecdotes.

Unfortunately, that is not enough and he tends to plough the same old path.

He goes somewhere - Galicia, Catalonia, Asturias - and visits the market, has lunch at a famous restaurant, talks to the chef and has a marvelous meal. He drops Christian names as though he is a friend of the people he meets and then sets off to the next place.

There are lots of banal comments, folksy quotes, too much detail - the different kinds of beans in one region, for example - and no-one he spoke to will ever be offended. A little more criticism and honesty would have been welcome.

Some parts are good, e.g. the chapter on olive oil, but overall this is a book to be nibbled at rather than eaten in one go - tapas rather than a full meal.