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Download Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon eBook

by Robin Gerber

Download Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon eBook
ISBN:
1591841046
Author:
Robin Gerber
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language:
English
Publisher:
Portfolio Hardcover; First Edition edition (October 20, 2005)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1444 kb
FB2 book:
1819 kb
DJVU:
1266 kb
Other formats
mobi lit doc lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
163


Gerber also explores Graham's particular journey in the broader context of women overcoming personal and . What we have in this volume is Robin Gerber's probing, illuminating analysis of a woman who once observed that she led "what I thought of as two separate lives.

Gerber also explores Graham's particular journey in the broader context of women overcoming personal and societal limitations to transform themselves into leaders. Wife and mother for twenty-three years, and then working person for thirty.

Katharine Graham book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Now, Robin Gerber focuses on the heart of Graham’s success: her .

Now, Robin Gerber focuses on the heart of Graham’s success: her leadership. Gerber shows how Graham overcame an emotionally impoverished childhood, deep insecurities, and a marriage to a brilliant but mentally ill husband. It’s also a deeply inspiring and hopeful book, offering women who continue to face sexism in the workplace a model for personal triumph.

For more than twenty years Katharine Graham was a self-described doormat wife. What we have in this volume is Robin Gerber's probing, illuminating analysis of a woman who once observed that she led "what I thought of as two separate lives

What we have in this volume is Robin Gerber's probing, illuminating analysis of a woman who once observed that she led "what I thought of as two separate lives. It is her career as CEO of the Washington Post Company which has attracted the most attention but only by understanding her as a daughter, wife, mother, and widow, however, can we possibly appreciate both her personal growth and professional achievements.

Graham was a distinguished American icon, thus leading her autobiography to obtain a Pulitzer Prize in 1998 in the Autobiography or. .Gerber, Robin (2005). Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon. ISBN 978-1-59184-104-3.

Graham was a distinguished American icon, thus leading her autobiography to obtain a Pulitzer Prize in 1998 in the Autobiography or Biography category. Not only did Personal History receive the high honor of a Pulitzer Prize, but the novel pursued greatness in the public opinion as well. Nora Ephron of The New York Times raved about Graham’s autobiography.

Leadership the Eleanor Roosevelt Way" "Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon" "Eleanor vs. Ike" (a novel) "Barbie and Ruth" ww. obingerber. You must do the thing you think you cannot d. Eleanor Roosevelt. Others named Robin Gerber.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg .

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Halesowen Chronicle Newspaper Northampton Herald And Post Newspaper Grenfell Support News Newspaper Westminster And City News Newspaper Mk News Newspaper Wharf Newspaper Kidderminster Chronicle Newspaper.

She is also the author of Leadership the Eleanor Roosevelt Way: Timeless Strategies from the First Lady of Courage and Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon. Robin's books are used in leadership development courses and corporate programs across the United States. Robin is a motivational speaker who uses the stories of great women to impart leadership lessons.

Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon .

Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon, Portfolio (New York, NY), 2005. Contributor to USA Today; columnist for Reader's Digest. Gerber uses the same thematic approach in Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon, which traces Graham's rise from well-to-do homemaker to the CEO of the Washington Post.

Robin Gerber, author of Leadership the Eleanor Roosevelt Way: Timeless Strategies from the First Lady of Courage and Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey of an American Icon. Olsen is provocatively honest in her new book, 50 After 50, as she openly talks about delicate topics from her past. I applaud her ability to re-create herself and seek her bliss. This book shows how we can all change our mind-set and transform ourselves if we choose. I highly recommend this book for anyone seeking their best life

A portrait of one of the business world's most esteemed women executives describes her emotionally impoverished childhood, takeover of The Washington Post after her husband's suicide, and controversial leadership decisions during her publication of the Pentagon Papers and coverage of Watergate. 20,000 first printing.
  • Pad
This was an interesting book that covered the personal life of Katherine Graham in great detail. However, I really had a hard time finding much about her true leadership style other than perhaps two sentences in the entire book. The totality of her leadership style would have to be deduced through the anecdotal material presented in the book. If you want to really know who she was and what she did, this is the one book to read. Was she a tremendous individual who fought hard to keep and build a great organization? Yes. Is it worth the time to read it? Yes.
  • Still In Mind
Graham's life and accomplishments were most inspiring and a valuable lesson to our business world.
  • Kaim
Excellent biography of Katharine Graham. My book group read her autobio, but by mistake I read this one. I was glad I did when I heard the discussion. It seemed to be more factual about some of the more difficult, personal things that she may have had a hard time writing about ... like how horrid her husband was to their children, calling them derogatory Jewish names, etc. I enjoyed reading her story very much.
  • Grokinos
Why read this book? A convincing answer is provided by Jim Collins in the Foreword, and I quote: "If I were forced to pick one business leader from whom to draw professional learning and personal aspirations, that one leader would very likely be Katharine Graham." As is the case with other great leaders, Collins explains, she delivered great results during her tenure, achieved a distinctive impact on the world "by creating a a role model that others follow," presided over "a significant crisis or renewal, in part by creating a role model that others follow," and finally, she left a legacy that "transcends her own tenure, and ultimately beyond her life." High praise indeed and wholly justified by Graham's professional achievements and personal integrity.

What we have in this volume is Robin Gerber's probing, illuminating analysis of a woman who once observed that she led "what I thought of as two separate lives. Wife and mother for twenty-three years, and then working person for thirty." It is her career as CEO of the Washington Post Company which has attracted the most attention but only by understanding her as a daughter, wife, mother, and widow, however, can we possibly appreciate both her personal growth and professional achievements. Of course, in her own memoirs (Personal History and Katharine Graham's Washington) she shares much of the same material which Gerber covers also. Here are what I consider to be especially significant facts:

1. Until her husband, Philip, committed suicide, Graham had had almost no direct involvement in the business world.

2. Following his death, she refused to sell the company and became its CEO, relying heavily on the management team to face a series of crises.

3. First, whether or not to publish the Pentagon Papers and thereby risk prosecution under the Espionage Act, jeopardize the company's IPO, and perhaps its lucrative television licenses. She decided to publish.

4. Then, whether or not to support Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein's investigation of the Watergate break-in and thereby incur the full wrath of the Nixon administration. She provided that support although, as she later admitted, "I was terrified" and "quaking in my boots."

Gerber skillfully examines each of these and other stressful situations and defining moments. Of greatest interest to me is Graham's gradual, sometimes painful acquisition of business acumen despite the shock and grief caused by her husband's death, especially at a time when the Post Company was going through its own serious difficulties. As countless others have already pointed out, Graham eventually developed outstanding leadership qualities and management skills without at any time compromising her personal decency and integrity. At the time of her death, those who knew her best loved her as much as they respected her.

If you share my high regard for Gerber's book, I urge you to read those which Graham wrote, "in her own words" and apparently without professional assistance. She was genuinely astonished by the fact that Personal History immediately became and then remained a bestseller. Few others were. Certainly no one among more than 4,000 who attended her funeral service on Monday, July 23, 2001, at Washington National Cathedral.

Robert McNamara served as a pallbearer with Vernon Jordan and her brother-in-law, Senator Robert Graham of Florida. Herbert Allen, Warren Buffett, Bill Gates, Mike Nichols, Jim Lehrer, Diane Sawyer, Barbara Walters, and Bob Woodward were among the ushers. Senators arrived in a bus as did hundreds of her associates at the Washington Post. In his eulogy, Ben Bradlee fondly referred to her as "Brenda Starr, girl reporter, [always] at the scene and ready to go." Probably better than anyone else did, Bradlee understood why having both "the heart of a journalist" and "the head of a businesswomen" made Katharine Graham "one of the greatest publishers of the last two centuries."